Maori Party

Trouble in coalition land?

We’ve had two terms when the National-led coalition government did a pretty good job at presenting a united front.  With the exception of Peter Dunne, who already went troppo over the last few years (did this coincide with legal highs?), the other partners didn’t openly defy National.

That has changed.  In spite of National being returned with a record-breaking 3rd term majority under MMP, its coalition partners and indeed National itself are now openly fighting in front of the kids.

There won’t be a referendum on national super while John Key is Prime Minister.

He has shot down ACT leader David Seymour’s call for the people to decide how superannuation should be funded.

Mr Seymour told his party’s annual conference on Saturday the current scheme wasn’t viable in the long term and there had to be changes to make it financially sustainable.

He wants an expert group appointed to come up with options for a referendum, and says raising the age from 65 isn’t the only one available.

Mr Key isn’t interested and says Mr Seymour, a government ally, didn’t talk to him before raising the issue.

“I read about it in the newspaper,” he said.

“There won’t be a referendum. The National Party is clear on super – the age should stay at 65 and the entitlement at 66 percent (of the average wage).”

During the 2008 election campaign, which he won, Mr Key pledged that if there was any change to national super under his watch he would resign from parliament.

There you go.  “Don’t broadside me in the media, son”, says Key to minnow David.   “We do these things behind the scenes where I can tell you to stop playing games.”

Says one commenter:

John Key has no problem spending $26 million on flag referendum but unwilling to spend any money on one as important as the future financial security of our country and how to fund superannuation.

But add this to Peter Dunne and the Maori Party being extremely vocal against sending New Zealand troops to Iraq, and in public at least, this coalition government looks far from a cohesive team.

I don’t get a sense this is by design.   Key’s having trouble with his back bench, can’t see eye to eye with Joyce who wants to keep giving money away to SkyCity and Team New Zealand no matter the public opposition, had to pull the plug on Parata’s charter schools, is getting constant static from Bill English over delivering a surplus, and he’s now bickering with coalition partners through the media.

To seasoned observers, these are interesting developments.

- NZN via 3 News

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National cabinet to approve troops for Iraq today

The controversial issue has split Parliament – and even some of the Prime Minister’s allies are vehemently opposed to intervening in the Middle East.

A deployment would conclude months of increasingly bellicose rhetoric since the general election as John Key ramped up talk of New Zealand’s need to intervene.

Labour defence spokesman Phil Goff said it seemed Mr Key had privately decided months ago to deploy troops to fight Isis.

He said New Zealand’s Western allies, rather than the Iraqi government, were driving the push to send Kiwi troops to the Middle East.

“My problem, and the Labour Party’s problem, is the avenue Key has chosen is likely to be the least effective way of dealing with the problem.”

He said that was because the Iraqi army was corrupt, had a “pathetic” leadership and was itself a cause of sectarian tensions and subsequent grievances Isis used to win support.

Mr Goff said Isis needed to be contained and isolated, starved of funds, weapons and personnel, and its victims given help.

I don’t know about you, but I think we should send Phil Goff to sort this out.  He seems to know exactly what to do.   Read more »

Labour’s ties to Ratana are questioned as well they should

Labour treats Maori with condescending and patronising behaviour.

They ‘expect’ support from Maori, in fact probably demand it behind closed doors, but the reality is after 90 years of association with Ratana the elders are finally getting the picture that more results for Maori have been delivered by the National party and their partnership with the Maori party.Labour is being put on notice again but anyone who has been observing politics as long as I have knows this has been going one for quite some time.

Maori it seems are content to talk lots but do little when it comes sorting out politicians.

At Ratana though Andrew Little got his beans, and it was particularly sharp in his mind after the elders changed the protocol for attending the marae, putting all politicians on the same level.

Only one got upset and that was Andrew Little.

Andrea Vance reports:

Ratana church leaders have warned Labour not to take its support for granted, after the party won six of the seven Maori seats at the election.

In a break from tradition, Labour leader Andrew Little and his MPs were obliged to walk onto the marae with politicians from other parties.

Events to mark the 142nd birthday of the prophet Tahupōtiki Wiremu Rātana ran well over time, because of the attendance of the Maori King Tūheitia Paki. But it’s known that church elders have long wanted MPs of all hues to be welcomed together.    Read more »

Is Metiria Turei trying to take the mantle of the Nasty Party off Labour?

Evil Kermit

Metiria Turei has had a mad rant at Ratana in the annual pilgrimage of politicians to get lectured at by people who will never vote for you.

Greens co-leader Metiria Turei launched a stinging attack on John Key in his absence at Ratana today, saying his view of New Zealand’s history was “warped, outrageous and deeply offensive”.

She also said Mr Key was a prime example of the “ignorant, uneducated Pakeha” economist Gareth Morgan had talked about the day before.

Ms Turei took aim at Mr Key’s recent comments that New Zealand was settled peacefully and that Maori would have welcomed the capital European settlers brought.

“The Prime Minister’s warped and outrageous view of history is deeply offensive to Maori but it also undermines decades of effort by Maori and Pakeha, including even by his own Government, to address some of the historic wrongs and encourage an understanding of New Zealand’s true history.”

Ms Turei had intended to make the comments in a speech at Ratana Pa, but time shortage meant she did not get the chance to speak.

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Maori party turns on terror enabler Derek Fox

The Maori party has moved to distance themselves from terror enabler Derek Fox.

The Maori Party distanced itself from former candidate Derek Fox after he controversially blamed the victims of the Paris terror attacks for their deaths.

Mr Fox said on Facebook that the editor of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo had “paid the price” for his “bigotry” and “arrogance”.

He stood by his comments, and said if the magazine had not published gratuitous insults, the victims “would still be alive now”.

“But they didn’t, in fact they ramped it up to sell more mags. Well, they got bitten severely on the bum.”  Read more »

Shane Taurima asks Maori Party a devastating question

You remember Shane.  He was the one running the Labour Party campaign from his TVNZ office.  Well, the Maori Party asked him to speak at their conference.  Where he said this

Mr Taurima spoke as part of a panel at the Maori Party AGM today, telling them they had to face up to their worst election result ever. “It is the worst result you have seen.”

He said he was not advocating doing deals “but it something you must consider.”

“I know as soon as we start talking deals things get a bit tetchy – but you need to have it on the table because things could turned out quite differently.”

He said the Maori Party also had to ask why it was that Maori voters went back to Labour – while other voters had deserted Labour in droves.

For all intent and purposes, the Maori party was annihilated except for the personal mana of one man.  And in fact, the Maori Party has always existed on the personal mana of its MPs rather than coherent policy framework and positioning.   Read more »

Hone gets his beans, again

Hone Harawira is a sucker for punishment.

His judge supervised re-count has put him in a worse position than when he started.

The number of votes for Mana leader Hone Harawira has been cut by two after a recount in the Te Tai Tokerau seat.

The Electoral Commission released the results of the recount this afternoon, reporting “minor variations” to the official result published on Saturday.

Votes for Labour’s Kelvin Davis rose from 9710 to 9712, and Mr Harawira’s votes fell from 8971 to 8969. Read more »

Better in the tent than outside

The Maori party have signed a confidence and supply agreement with National and Te Ururoa Flavell has become a Minister.

John Key keeps his inclusive government ticking along and the Maori party continues to be able to deliver.

Te Ururoa Flavell will become a Minister outside Cabinet after the Maori Party reached a confidence and supply agreement with National for the third straight term.

The Maori Party co-leader was announced as the new Minister of Maori Development (a new title for what was Maori Affairs) as well as holding the Whanau Ora and associate economic development portfolios.

It came after Flavell, outgoing MP and fellow Maori Party co-leader Tariana Turia and Prime Minister John Key officially signed the relationship accord with National – Te Tatau ki te Paerangi – at Parliament this afternoon.

Key welcomed the third straight agreement he had signed with the Maori Party and the way it had approached governing with National.

“I have no doubt that we New Zealanders are better off because of it.”

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Play or get off the field

As Labour lurches towards utter destruction with David Cunliffe at sixes and sevens there are some out there with good advice.

Lew at Kiwipolitico had this to say about National’s excellence at data-driven campaigns:

I have been criticising Labour, in particular, since at least 2007 on their unwillingness or inability to bring modern data-driven campaign and media strategy to bear in their campaigns — effectively, to embrace The Game and play it to win, rather than regarding it as a regrettable impediment to some pure and glorious ideological victory. Mostly the responses I get from the faithful fall under one or more of the following:

  • National has inherent advantages because the evil old MSM is biased
  • the polls are biased because landlines or something
  • the inherent nature of modern neoliberal society is biased
  • people have a cognitive bias towards the right’s messaging because Maslow
  • it inevitably leads to populist pandering and the death of principle
  • The Game itself devours the immortal soul of anyone who plays ( which forms a handy way to demonise anyone who does play)

But data is not a Ring of Power that puts its users in thrall to the Dark Lord. And, unlike the One Ring, it can’t be thrown into a volcano and the world saved from its pernicious influence. Evidence and strategy are here to stay. Use them, or you’re going to get used. The techniques available to David Farrar and the National party are not magic. They are available to anyone. Whether Labour has poor data or whether they use it poorly I do not know. It looks similar from the outside, and I have heard both from people who ought to know. But it doesn’t really matter. Data is only as good as what you do with it. Whatever they’re doing with it isn’t good enough.

The best example from this campaign isn’t Labour, however — it’s Kim Dotcom. He said on election night that it was only in the past two weeks that he realised how tainted his brand was. He threw $4.5 million at the Internet MANA campaign and it polled less than the Māori Party, who had the same number of incumbent candidates and a tiny fraction of the money and expertise. Had he thought to spend $30,000 on market research* asking questions like those asked by Curia about what New Zealanders think of Kim Dotcom, he could have saved himself the rest of the money, and saved Hone Harawira his seat, Laila Harré her political credibility, and the wider left a severe beating.

That is effective use of data: not asking questions to tell you what you want to hear, but to tell you what you need to know. This electoral bloodletting is an opportunity for the NZ political left to become reality-adjacent, and we can only hope they take it. Because if they don’t, reality is just going to keep winning.

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Just 1% in it, Maori party supporters need to vote for Kelvin Davis

Maori Television has a shock poll in Te Tai Tokerau, showing that Kelvin Davis is within 1% of tipping over Hone Harawira.

A major upset could be ahead for Hone Harawira in the Māori electorate of Te Tai Tokerau, given the close battle between him and Kelvin Davis according to our Māori Television poll results.

Hone Harawira is still leading the electorate on 38%.  However Kelvin Davis is on 37%, so there is just 1% between them.

No doubt, Hone Harawira’s knees will be shaking from those numbers and so too will Internet-MANA.    Read more »