Maori Party

Another reason National needs to dump the Maori Party: they push for separatism

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The Maori Party is calling for a “long overdue” law change to establish Maori wards on every district council in New Zealand.

Co-leader Te Ururoa Flavell will present a petition to Parliament at the urging of New Plymouth mayor Andrew Judd, who championed the creation of a Maori ward in his city – a move blocked by a public vote last year.

Under existing legislation, councils can choose to establish Maori wards. However, if 5 per cent of voters sign a petition opposed to such a move, the decision then goes to a binding referendum. Read more »

Maori Party makes National its bitch over Kermadecs

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That Northland loss to Winston is costing. Big.

After ruling out compensation for iwi affected by a proposed Kermadec ocean sanctuary, the Government has buckled to pressure and will now consider it.

A Bill to establish the sanctuary unanimously passed its first reading in Parliament yesterday, but a number of iwi are angry about the lack of consultation.

The Maori Party has met with Environment Minister Nick Smith, who agreed to talks with iwi on compensation in return for the Maori Party supporting the Bill. Read more »

Maori will do a better job than the government

I’m glad to hear it.  And it is sort of the point…

The Maori Party has defended its backing for the sale of thousands of state houses, saying iwi will be able to take on the homes and do a better job than Housing New Zealand.

A bill which paves the way for National’s sale of up to 8000 Housing New Zealand properties passed into law yesterday, with the support of Act, United Future and the Maori Party.

Opposition MPs attacked the Maori Party during the bill’s third reading.

Green Party MP Marama Davidson said the Maori Party’s argument that iwi could purchase some of the houses was not a good excuse.

“That is the tiniest possibility,” she said. “I will say that that is not enough … justification for the Maori Party to support this legislation because we know that privatisation has never collectively benefited Maori.”

Labour MP Carmel Sepuloni said she was shocked with the Maori Party’s vote of support.

“That is on record now, and it will not be forgotten,” she said.

The Septic Tank’s at it again, keeping Maori in their place as victims who need to be cared for by the State.  Read more »

Maori Party grasps racist law recall idea with both hands

Is anyone surprised?

The Maori Party has thrown its support behind calls for legislation which discriminates against Maori to be changed.

The 1962 Maori Community Development Act deems it an offence to provide alcohol at a gathering of Maori people, and also gives Maori wardens the power to kick Maori out of bars or confiscate their car keys, Radio New Zealand reports.

A lawyer in Wellington, told RNZ he was concerned about the provisions and said they were racist and outdated.

Maori Party co-leader, Te Ururoa Flavell agreed with the sentiment and said that it pays to acknowledge how long ago the legislation was written, but it is in need of review. Read more »

Maori to have bigger say in nobbled RMA reform in exchange for first reading support only

It seems it’s RMA reform when you aren’t really having RMA reform.

But what can we really expect when Nick Smith is the minister running this debacle?

The Government will introduce its long-awaited Resource Management Act reforms to Parliament next week after securing the support of the Maori Party.

The reforms to the country’s main planning document stalled two years ago when National’s support partners refused to back them because of their potential impact on the environment.

That impasse has now been broken, and Government planned to hold the first reading of the legislation next week. The most controversial proposals around environmental protections had been diluted, Environment Minister Nick Smith said.

Dr Smith said today the bill would support business growth and housing development while also ensuring more effective environmental management.

Its main changes would be new national planning templates for councils, faster and more flexible planning processes, reduced requirements for minor consents, and stronger national direction on issues such as housing.

Controversial changes to sections six and seven of the Act, which set out environmental bottom lines, have been “pulled back”.

The only change in these sections would be to the management of risks from natural hazards.

Dr Smith said the Maori Party had agreed to back the legislation to a select committee.

He described it as a “compromise bill” because of the environmental concessions, which had “changed the tone” of sections six and seven.

Read more »

Boo hoo, they’re criminals and dangerous ones at that

The Maori Party have decided it is their turn to be crim-hugging dead-beat MPs.

Reports that Kiwi deportees were in handcuffs for an entire flight from Australia have been slammed by a politician as an attack on their human rights.

A group of 12 detainees from Christmas Island arrived at Auckland International Airport on a charter flight on Thursday morning, with eight of them placed on supervision orders under a new monitoring regime.

Police and Corrections met the offenders on arrival to put them through a rigorous processing and induction process.

The offenders were spotted coming off the plane in handcuffs, and there have been suggestions they were handcuffed for the duration of the flight from Australia.

Maori Party co-leader Marama Fox said it was inappropriate to handcuff the deportees, as they had already served their time in Australia.

“If they had been released out of a [New Zealand] prison they would be walking out the door, free, with a bag under their arm, into the community.

“Now they’re coming home on a plane, shackled – if that’s correct, to me that is just further diminishing their mana, their self-esteem, their human rights.”

Read more »

80% of Maori believe the Government (that’s you and me) isn’t helping them enough

Bludgers be bludgers.

Four out of five Maori believe the New Zealand Government is not doing enough to combat poverty in the community.

Around 17 percent of New Zealand’s population, or 622,000 people, are assessed to be in poverty with Maori and Pacific Islanders considered to be some of the highest risk groups.

Motu Economic and Public Policy research revealed that 82 percent of Maori surveyed believe the government is not adequately addressing the issue.

It compares with 51 percent of non-Maori.

Maori tend to have more “leftist” beliefs than non-Maori, the report released today says, with the majority of responses believing that many live in need because society is unfair.

But Motu affiliate and Auckland University’s Professor Robert MacCulloch says how Maori have formed these beliefs is unclear.

“It’s impossible to say whether these differences in economic beliefs are due to long-standing cultural differences or perceptions of historical injustices,” he said.

“Or more recent experiences of discrimination amongst Maori.”

Read more »

Haka bar offensive? How so?

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Former All Black Byron Kelleher has been slammed for cultural insensitivity over the launch of his new pub Haka Corner.

The 57-test star is preparing to open the sports bar in his home city of Toulouse, and there are also plans to extend to other French cities.

But Maori Party co-leader Te Ururoa Flavell and his predecessor Sir Pita Sharples have criticised its linking of the traditional Maori war cry with a booze outlet. Read more »

Will the Maori Party refuse to do a deal with Labour over Twyford’s attack on the Chinese?

Back in 2008 the Maori Party took a firm line on the halfwitted and racist comments made by Lockwood Smith.

Maori Party co-leader Tariana Turia said the comments were racist and had Dr Smith not apologised it could have affected the party’s future relationship with National. She does not think he could now be immigration minister.

Te Ururoa Flavell and Marama Fox need to make their views on Twyford’s anti-Chinese racism very, very clear.

No one was in any doubt about what Tariana Turia’s views were, but then Mrs Turia was one of the few politicians who actually stood up for what she believed in at all times.

Mrs Turia told NZPA she thought the remarks were racist.

“It is racist to describe people in such a negative way.”

The size of hands was irrelevant and many employers who hired workers under the scheme had been “really thrilled” with their workers.    Read more »

Oh, he’s sorry alright. Sorry he was caught

Sonny Tau, the Ngapuhi leader and pigeon-fancier is sorry…he was caught.

The Department of Conservation (DOC) has confirmed it is investigating allegations Mr Tau tried to smuggle the native wood pigeons from Invercargill to Northland.

He was reported to have been found with the birds under his jacket.

There are two species of native pigeon: the kererū, and the more threatened Chatham Islands pigeon – the parea.

Although the native pigeon was traditionally hunted for its meat and feathers, that is now illegal.

Kererū, or kukupa, are a protected species under the Wildlife Act 1953, DOC said.

It said the maximum penalty for being caught hunting the bird was a $100,000 fine and/or imprisonment of two years.

Mr Tau has released a statement admitting there was an incident on Tuesday last week in which he was questioned by a DOC officer about kererū in his possession.

“It is important to note that no charges over regulatory breaches have been laid at this point, therefore it is inappropriate for me to comment further on this matter,” he said.

“I wish to assure you I did, and will continue to, fully cooperate with any investigation. I also wish to say this was a mistake, which I deeply regret. The laws around native bird protection are important and to be respected by all, myself included.”

Read more »