Maori Party

Colin Craig is a numpty and proves it almost every week

Colin Craig is a litigious fool.

He is now suing the Electoral Commission…all over an insignificant sum.

He will spend much more than that in order to extract it, even if he succeeds he will lose.

Then again he has spent millions of dollars over the past few years perfecting the art of losing.

Conservative Party leader Colin Craig is challenging the Electoral Commission’s allocation of time and money for broadcasting programmes.

Mr Craig has instructed his lawyer to apply for judicial review of the Electoral Commission’s decision. He believes his party should get more funding than Act.   Read more »

Politicians who resort to using courts to bully broadcasters deserve what they get

Colin Craig is a bully.

He uses the law to try to silence critics, and now he has gone to court to bully TV3, a private company, to force them to have him on their minor party debate show.

Conservatives leader Colin Craig has won an eleventh-hour High Court scrap over his exclusion from a televised political debate.

TV3′s political show The Nation did not invite Mr Craig to a minor parties debate tomorrow morning, which will include the Green Party, New Zealand First, the Maori Party, Act, Mana and United Future.

Mr Craig filed urgent legal proceedings with the High Court at Auckland today and his application for an interim injunction to restrict the screening of the debate without him was heard this afternoon.

Justice Murray Gilbert sided with the Conservative Party leader saying any inconvenience to MediaWorks was outweighed by the public interest in having Mr Craig at the debate.

The debate cannot legally go ahead without his inclusion.

MediaWorks confirmed that rather than scrap tomorrow’s debate, they would include Mr Craig.

“We’ll have to somehow squeeze him in,” said director of news Mark Jennings.

But The Nation’s Tim Watkin said the production values of the show would suffer as a result.

Each political leader will get less than five minutes to speak because of the late inclusion, he said.

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Hooton on Labour’s skulduggery in Te Tai Tokerau

Matthew Hooton uses his NBR column to explain about David Cunliffe’s skullduggery in Te Tai Tokerau.

Less widely reported was Mr Key’s reference to the Maori Party. Like National voters in Epsom and Ohariu, the prime minister told those in the Maori electorates to back his support parties’ candidates.

This is a bit cheeky: National doesn’t run candidates in the Maori electorates because, theoretically, its policy is to abolish them (although it’s extremely doubtful Mr Key personally agrees, given his commitment to national reconciliation).

That’s why Mr Key’s nod to the Maori Party is so important. Under MMP, this election remains too close to call. For National to have a chance of a third term, Mr Key may well need Maori Party co-leader Te Ururoa Flavell to retain Waiariki. Even more important is the result in Hone Harawira’s Te Tai Tokerau electorate, which spans Cape Reinga to West Auckland.

Most commentators assume Mr Harawira is completely safe, especially now he has scored Kim Dotcom’s dosh. But that reveals they haven’t looked at the data very carefully.

Three years ago, Mr Harawira only sneaked back into parliament, beating Labour’s Kelvin Davis by a mere 1165 votes, 6% of those cast. Labour won the party vote easily, by 10%. For his part, Mr Harawira’s majority was well less than National’s party vote and also NZ First’s (see table below). Obviously, many National and NZ First voters backed the Maori Party’s candidate, while Green voters backed Mr Harawira.

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This time, the Maori Party has Te Hira Paenga as its candidate. He would make an excellent MP. A father of five, he has post-graduate qualifications and is assistant principal at Hato Petera College. Whatever: he should fall on his taiaha.  Read more »

What Maori think about political parties

With so many Pakeha commentators talking about the possible demise of the Maori Party, it is interesting to see what happens when Maori are asked, as Radio Waatea did early this week.

What a different result, and easy to see why Jamie Whyte has gone Maori-bashing:

Which party are you most likely to vote for?

39% – Maori Party

15% – Greens
13% – Internet Mana

Read more »

The left is waking up to the toxicity of Kim Dotcom and his cult party

While Kim Dotcom might like to chant “Fuck John Key” to his slavering minions and weirdo hipster crowd others are starting to find out all about Kim Dotcom and his fake political party.

The smart amongst the left are now starting to wake up and speak up.

Pablo at Kiwipolitco writes:

I came back from six weeks abroad to see the beginning of the Internet Party’s “party party” launches. It leaves me with some questions.

It seems that what the Internet Party has done is this. Using Kim Dotcom’s wallet as a springboard, it has selected a candidate group largely made up of attractive metrosexuals (only a few of whom have political experience), recruited as window dressing a seasoned (and also attractive) leftist female as party leader (even though she has no experience in the IT field), and run a slick PR campaign featuring cats that is long on rhetoric and promises and short on viable policies. The stated aim is to get out the apathetic youth vote and thereby reach the three percent electoral threshold.

The strategic alliance with the Mana Party makes sense, especially for Mana. They get additional resources to more effectively campaign for at least two electorate seats, especially given that it looks like the Maori Party is moribund and the Maori electoral rolls will thereby be more contestable even if Labour tries to reclaim its historical support in it. The Internet Party gets to coattail on Mana’s activism and the presence of relatively seasoned cadres on the campaign trail. Between the two, they might well reach the five percent threshold, although current polling suggests something well less than that. The lack of political experience in the Internet Party could be problematic in any event.

But I am still left wondering what the IP stands for and how it proposes to effect change if its candidates are elected. We know that the IP came about mostly due to Dotcom’s hatred of John Key. But Dotcom is ostensibly not part of the IP, which makes his attention-grabbing presence at its public events all the more puzzling. Leaving aside Dotcom’s background and baggage for the moment, imagine if major financial donors stole the stage at Labour, National or Green Party rallies. What would the reaction be? Plus, hating on John Key is not a policy platform, however much the sentiment may be shared by a good portion of the general public (and that is debatable).

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Haere Ra

Claire Trevett looks back on dignified politicians

Few could question the integrity with which Sharples and Turia approached their political lives. They rarely got embroiled in the mundane distractions of politics, the grandstanding and personal snipes, unless it was in defence of themselves. They were the perfect complementary force. Turia was the rock, Sharples was the orator, galvanising and the perfect voice to quell suspicion about the Maori Party among Pakeha.

When it came to the Pakeha media, both took time to explain who they were and what they were doing, over and over again if need be. They were dignified, courteous and calm. Turia’s entertaining habit of breaking into giggles when asked the occasional ridiculous question often said more than words would have.

The reality of politics has had the usual erosive effect. The acrimonious split with Hone Harawira delivered a cut the party has yet to heal from, despite its bravado. It continues to struggle with the perception it has simply become a stooge for National. Its MPs would occasionally adopt siege mentality at times of trial rather than front the issue.

But they stayed relentlessly on message, and that message has stayed consistent throughout. For Turia, that message has been life-long: the case for Maori self-determination. In her maiden speech as a new Labour MP in 1997, she did not bother with the usual platitudes of paying homage to the party she represented, or those who led it. Instead, she spoke of Maori being forced to live in two worlds, “drip-fed, spoon-fed and acted upon like imbeciles”. Read more »

Here’s a sign of good leadership – literally

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Maori Party have more faith in their leader than Labour…and she is retiring!

 

Hands up who wants compulsory Te Reo?

The Labour party seems intent on transforming itself into a minor political party.

First there was the Man ban, then wanting to regulate trucks in the fast lane, their ongoing pandering to single interest groups, David Cunliffe’s apology for being a man and now they want to make Te Reo compulsory for every school child.

All New Zealand schoolchildren would learn Maori under Labour’s long-term plan for te reo, but it appears the party is loath to give the policy a high profile.

Labour Maori affairs spokeswoman Nanaia Mahuta and education spokesman Chris Hipkins indicated Labour had an “aspirational” target for Maori to be taught in all schools after the Maori Party’s Te Tai Tokerau candidate, Te Hira Paenga, claimed Labour had endorsed his party’s policy for compulsory te reo in schools.

“We are glad to see Labour at last getting the message that our reo is something that we all, as New Zealanders, should embrace,” Mr Paenga said.

Ms Mahuta initially suggested Mr Paenga had the wrong end of the stick, saying Labour would only promote its own policy which was “the recognition that te reo should be a working language for all New Zealanders”.

However, Ms Mahuta was far more direct in a debate held in Gisborne earlier this month when she said: “We’ve made a clear commitment that te reo Maori will be compulsory in our schools.”

Read more »

Latest Roy Morgan shows Labour mired in 20s

The latest poll from the left-wings favourite pollster, Roy Morgan, shows that Labour remains mired in the 20s. Every polling company now shows labour stuck in the debilitating and moral sapping 20s.

The Cunliffe Caper has failed, and with less than 80 days until the election they are in desperate trouble.

Things with polls have got so bad that the left-wing blogs no no longer report on them.

Today’s New Zealand Roy Morgan Poll shows a fall in support for National (48%, down 1.5%) but National are still well ahead of a potential Labour/Greens alliance (40%, unchanged).

Support for Key’s Coalition partners has raised slightly overall with the Maori Party 1.5% (up 0.5%), Act NZ (1%, up 0.5%) and United Future 0% (unchanged).

Support for the Labour Party is unchanged at 28%, the Greens are unchanged at 12%, New Zealand First is 5.5% (up 1.5%) and the Internet-Mana Party alliance is at 2.5% (unchanged). Support for the Conservative Party of NZ is 1% (down 0.5%) and support for Independent/ Others is 0.5% (down 0.5%).

If a National Election were held now the latest New Zealand Roy Morgan Poll shows that the result would be an easy victory for the National Party and a third term for Prime Minister John Key.  Read more »

Guest Post – Is the prospect of an unstable Government Holding Labour Back

A regular reader and correspondent sent in this guest post about Labour.


I enjoy reading blogs and opinion pieces from across the political spectrum.  Including The Standard, The Daily Blog as well as various opinion pieces in the newspapers.

At present we are less than 80 days away from the 2014 election.  The election and the possible outcomes are constantly on the minds of the political tragics from both the left and the right.  Much of NZ don’t really seem to care.  They don’t understand that the outcome of the 2014 election may have an impact on many aspects of their life.

I spend much time thinking what will be the makeup of the government after 20 September 2014.  Personally (and this may come as a surprise to some people is that I am probably comfortable with a Centre left Government.  I would be much more happy with a National Party Government, but a Centre Left Government in the mould of the 1999-2008 Government would be acceptable.  I have a stable job and my mortgage is very manageable.  But there is one thing that worries me greatly.

My deep concern which is very dear to my heart is how stable will a Left Government be.  I believe that a stable Government will be the single most important outcome of the 2014 election.

An unstable Government is not going to be good for NZ.  The people most impacted will be the typical supporter of one of the many left parties.  Helen Clark held together very successfully coalition Governments.  John Key has done had it easier with options to the right with Act and Dunne in the centre, and to the left with the Maori Party.  Clark had strength of personality, the stick of Heather Simpson, and a caucus which was more or less 100% behind her.  Key remains National’s biggest asset and in the latest round of opinion poll is still untouchable with over 50.0% party support and an unprecedented support as the preferred Prime Minister.  There are no public rumblings of dissent.

But there is a massive issue looming for any in-coming Labour led Government.  And this is the point of this guest column.  I am genuinely interested in the views of the left supporters (if there are any who lurk here)  My proposition is that part of the reason (there are a whole lot of reasons) why support for the left (Labour and Greens) is barely moving off 40% is that the left are not convincing the middle ground voters that they will be able to deliver stable Government to NZ.  The Coalition of the Left will be made up of multiple parties.     Read more »