Māori politics

All of Little’s good work undone by ‘courageous’ pandering to Maori

Andrew Little, ably assisted by a compliant media, has supposedly built up his cred to better proportions than the previous leaders since Clark.

The claims though were specious and come from people who should know better were just plain wrong.

Whatever level of acceptance Andrew Little had managed to claw his way to, though, has been destroyed by his interest in exploring Maori making their own laws…kind of a Maori sharia proposal.

Labour leader Andrew Little has proposed looking at giving Maori greater self-governance, possibly including the ability to make some of their own laws.

Mr Little made the comments yesterday, referring to a Waitangi Tribunal finding last year that Northland Maori did not cede their sovereignty when signing the Treaty.

Prime Minister John Key was criticised by elders at Waitangi for dismissing that report. Mr Little said the Waitangi Tribunal report found Maori should be able to make their own laws on matters affecting them. While that would be “highly problematic” he said it should be looked at.

Mr Little acknowledged it could concern some New Zealanders. “The fear is always that these things turn into a ‘they are getting special privilege’ or ‘they are getting a control we would never be able to have’. We have to be sensitive to that, but we’ve also got to understand for iwi now and those who have had their settlements and developed their own economic base, there are some things we might want to say they can be responsible for that is consistent with historical obligations.”

He said it was time to look at what would happen after the settlements were completed.

He said some Native American tribes had law-making powers over their territories in the United States where recognised tribes were exempt from some laws – including taxation – and could create their own laws in many areas. Mr Little said allowing separate law-making was “highly problematic”.

“But we shouldn’t be so dismissive of any claim by iwi over what they do. We do have to function as a nation-state and we don’t want to compromise that. But let’s have a look at it.”

Mr Key said allowing some iwi the ability to make their own law would be “divisive” and he did not support the suggestion.

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He could form the Whinger Party with Eleanor Catton

The problem with moaning liberal elite luvvies and socialist “entrepreneurs” is that they like to hear the sound of their own voice.

Last week it was Eleanor Catton bleating on about how un-loved she is and assisting us all to now why.

This week we have Gareth Morgan having another rant.

Of course he’d never want to test his never-ending opinions on almost everything with the voting public would he?

Gareth Morgan is heading to Orewa to confront what he calls the “ignorance of Brash-think”.

The venue and name are a nod to former National Party leader Don Brash, whose 2004 speech in the town led to a heated period of debate about the Treaty of Waitangi.

Dr Morgan is stepping into those uncertain waters tomorrow when he speaks to the Orewa Rotary Club.

He said he had deliberately chosen to speak at Orewa because it was where Dr Brash gave “one of the most damaging speeches ever made in terms of Treaty relations”.

“It’s exactly the cohort I’ve been talking about as having a high level of ignorance on Treaty matters.”

He says there was a hotbed of ignorance which needed to be confronted because of the need for an ongoing relationship with Maori after all Treaty of Waitangi settlements are finished.

“There are still large tracts of people who indulge in Brash-think on this topic. I want to expose that.”

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Labour’s ties to Ratana are questioned as well they should

Labour treats Maori with condescending and patronising behaviour.

They ‘expect’ support from Maori, in fact probably demand it behind closed doors, but the reality is after 90 years of association with Ratana the elders are finally getting the picture that more results for Maori have been delivered by the National party and their partnership with the Maori party.Labour is being put on notice again but anyone who has been observing politics as long as I have knows this has been going one for quite some time.

Maori it seems are content to talk lots but do little when it comes sorting out politicians.

At Ratana though Andrew Little got his beans, and it was particularly sharp in his mind after the elders changed the protocol for attending the marae, putting all politicians on the same level.

Only one got upset and that was Andrew Little.

Andrea Vance reports:

Ratana church leaders have warned Labour not to take its support for granted, after the party won six of the seven Maori seats at the election.

In a break from tradition, Labour leader Andrew Little and his MPs were obliged to walk onto the marae with politicians from other parties.

Events to mark the 142nd birthday of the prophet Tahupōtiki Wiremu Rātana ran well over time, because of the attendance of the Maori King TÅ«heitia Paki. But it’s known that church elders have long wanted MPs of all hues to be welcomed together.    Read more »

Muppet Mayor Mandates Maori quota

These muppets never give in, it is bad enough in Auckland having unelected Maori board members lording it over us all, but now the Mayor of New Plymouth is proposing that all councils have 50% of council seats allocated to Maori.

It is breathtaking racism and wonky thinking.

I doubt he will be mayor for long.

New Plymouth mayor Andrew Judd has taken his fight for Maori representation a step further, calling for a law change so up to half of all councillors in New Zealand are Maori.

Judd, already fighting critics over his council’s plans to create a Maori ward, believes there should be more Maori representation across the country to better reflect the Treaty of Waitangi.

“The reasonable interpretation of the Treaty is that you would have fifty-fifty representation around the table,” Judd said.

“We should be incorporating the Maori perspective around council tables, and ultimately that would mean up to half the representation each.”  Read more »

Better in the tent than outside

The Maori party have signed a confidence and supply agreement with National and Te Ururoa Flavell has become a Minister.

John Key keeps his inclusive government ticking along and the Maori party continues to be able to deliver.

Te Ururoa Flavell will become a Minister outside Cabinet after the Maori Party reached a confidence and supply agreement with National for the third straight term.

The Maori Party co-leader was announced as the new Minister of Maori Development (a new title for what was Maori Affairs) as well as holding the Whanau Ora and associate economic development portfolios.

It came after Flavell, outgoing MP and fellow Maori Party co-leader Tariana Turia and Prime Minister John Key officially signed the relationship accord with National – Te Tatau ki te Paerangi – at Parliament this afternoon.

Key welcomed the third straight agreement he had signed with the Maori Party and the way it had approached governing with National.

“I have no doubt that we New Zealanders are better off because of it.”

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Threats and demands and he wonders why they’ve been snubbed

bully

Photo/ 3News

Who does Kingi Taurua think he is?

After years of abuse, both of the government, and royal visitors is it any wonder that they don’t get visitors anymore.

The fact Prince William and his wife won’t be visiting Waitangi next month has so incensed a Ngapuhi Maori elder he says he’ll knock down a famous monument to the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.

He’s also threatened to block Prime Minister John Key from ever returning to Waitangi’s lower marae.

Ngapuhi Chief Kingi Taurua usually helps keep the peace at Waitangi but not any more – the Treaty grounds have been left off the royal travel itinerary and he’s furious.

“If the Prince don’t come in April then we are going to knock it down,” he says, speaking about the monument erected in the 1880s commemorating the Treaty.  Read more »

Clever stuff by John Key

John Key is a master politician.

Check this out from Waitangi:

Before the fish protest Key had attempted to convince local iwi leaders that fossil fuel exploration was in Maori interests. He invited the leaders of the hikoi to Wellington to spend a week with his ministers going over the facts around environmental risks and job creation.

“If I am wrong and you are right, I will walk out and join that protest,” he said.  Read more »

A taniwha in the clouds?

Fresh out of luck after losing the water battle, maori bludgers are now trying their hand tilting at clouds, or rainbows or other unseen forces in order to stand over commercial organisations with their brown-mail. They’ll claim a new flying taniwha is angry anytime soon.

The government’s plan to auction 4G spectrum in September or October faces delay, with Maori claimants to spectrum rights reactivating a dormant claim to the Waitangi Tribunal by seeking an urgent hearing on it.

Pundits are picking anywhere between $200 million to $400 million for Crown coffers from the auction of airwaves freed up by the switchover from analogue to digital TV – which are suitable for the new fourth-genertion mobile networks being rolled out by Telecom, Vodafone and 2degrees. A similar auction across the Tasman raised $A1.96 billion for the Australian government.    Read more »

The only person looking to bribe Maori more than John Key is David Shearer

David Shearer has professed a willingness to sell membership and policy in order to get Ratana on board. He has basically dropped his trousers in an attempt to attract Maori support and at the same time attacked the Maori party.

If Shearer wants to win back all the Maori seats, he’s gonna be offering some serious pork, over and above all the recent progress on Treaty claims.

I wonder how Waitakere Man would feel about that.

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A sensible Maori leader

Mark Solomon has broken ranks with the greedy, grasping Maori Council who are intent on gang style standover to extract cash form the government:

An influential iwi leader may have given the Government’s legal team a boost as it prepares to mount a defence to a Maori Council bid to stop its flagship asset sales programme.

Ngai Tahu iwi leader Mark Solomon told TVNZ’s Q and A yesterday that he does not believe that any sell-down of the southern state power company Meridian would have any impact on Ngai Tahu’s rights and interests in water.

That is exactly the argument the Crown will be mounting in the High Court at Wellington tomorrow against the part sale of the first SOE off the block, Mighty River Power.

He also disagreed with the finding of the Waitangi Tribunal that it would be a breach of the Treaty of Waitangi if the Government proceeded to sell shares without first providing Maori with a remedy to recognise their rights.

He pointed out that that tribunal had also said that a sell-down of 49 per cent did not prevent the Government from addressing the rights and the interests of Maori – a contradiction the Government has similarly pointed to on several occasions.

“Personally I do not believe that the sell-down of parts of Meridian will affect Ngai Tahu’s rights and interest to water,” Mr Solomon said.