Maori

Apparently Maori are as special as Muhammad

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The outrage started yesterday on Twitter and naturally it is now news, that some Maori are mortally offended by…shower curtains.

An American online store selling shower curtains depicting historic Māori is being called deplorable for the culturally inappropriate items.

Images of about 15 of Gottfried Lindauer portraits, including those of Māori leaders, are being sold as shower curtains for just under $100 by the Fine Art America website. Lindauer painted the detailed portraits of Māori in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Art historian Ngahuia Te Awekotuku, also a descendent of some of the Lindauer subjects, said Māori culture was being exploited, and it was appalling.

She said Māori images on teatowels and crockery were bad enough – but this was much worse.

“To actually see Wiremu Kingi as a shower person is absolutely extraordinary and profoundly hurtful. The arrogance of art producers in Western creators’ commerce never fails to amaze me.

“In traditional cultural terms, in the context of tikanga Māori of Māori values around the sanctity of the body and the intimacy of the bathroom, to have an ancestor as a shower curtain is profoundly insulting.”

The images include iwi leader Rewi Manga Maniapoto, and the Taranaki leader and chief of the Te Ati Awa Tribe, Wiremu Kingi Te Rangitake.

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Maori ratbags putting motorists at risk

Kelvin Davis has spoken out about his own criminal constituents who were busted running a scam in his electorate. Normally he hugs them like his life depends  upon it.

A Maori group claiming sovereignty of Northland is issuing its own licence plates, warrants of fitness and registrations, claiming they’re as legitimate as the real thing. But none of them are issued by the New Zealand Transport Authority.

The group says the Crown has no authority in Northland, but police say the warrants are a fraud and the people selling them are putting lives at risk.

They come from a Maori incorporation, Nga Uri Whakatupu Ngati Hine, whose members believe they can issue the documents themselves.

“Basically a Maori incorporation is a state outside of Government,” says fake warrant holder Phil Saleh. “Maori are entitled to their own jurisdiction and their own laws.”

The stickers bear the Maori for warrant of fitness, “whakamana waka”, and say they’re authorised under the “Native Waka Motor Vehicle Act 2005”.

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Mayor Andrew Judd is trying to get you to buy into his guilt trip

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An anti-racism hikoi in New Plymouth is reaching its end today, but Mayor Andrew Judd hopes it sparks a nationwide conversation about Maori-Pakeha relations.

Hundreds participated in the three-day march, which was organised to show support for Mr Judd after he announced he wouldn’t be standing for the mayoralty again due to the abuse he received for championing Maori issues.

Mr Judd was spat at and abused when he announced the council wanted to introduce a Maori ward, which received a resounding ‘no’ vote in a citizens-initiated referendum.

Mr Judd believes Pakeha have an inherent privilege and need to understand that if Aotearoa is to become a more harmonious society.  Read more »

Maori don’t need Internet access

NZ Newswire reports:

Only 68 per cent of Maori households have internet access compared with the national average of 83 per cent, new data shows.

Maori Development Minister Te Ururoa Flavell has released the report on Maori in the ICT Sector, saying it reveals issues that need to be addressed.

Despite the relatively low number of Maori households with internet access, the report says 15 to 24-year-olds are high users of mobile technology which they use to access it.

Mr Flavell says Maori should be helped into ICT career pathways.   Read more »

$500,000 for a piece of wood carved by a Maori? Cue the wailing about toanga and it “wanting to be home”

Half a million bucks for a chunk of wood carved by a Maori…that no one knows what it even is?

The 68cm piece, resembling a mutu kaka or parrot snare, is expected to fetch hundreds of thousands of dollars when it goes under the hammer at Christie’s Art d’Afrique et d’Océanie sale in Paris on June 23.

t has an estimate of NZ$322,000 to NZ$483,000.

Leading world authority on Maori and Pacific art, ethnologist and anthropologist the late Dr Roger Neich, who died in 2010, described the item in 2007 as being the most ornate he had ever seen.

He attributed the carving to the East Coast of New Zealand’s North Island and to the late 18th or early 19th century.   Read more »

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And here was me thinking Maori were the warrior race

Maori have portrayed themselves as the warrior race for many, many years.

But it seems they have become emasculated and become a pathetic girly race of half-people, upset over words and stories told in the wrong way.

A report by Mediaworks presenter Heather du Plessis-Allan that likened Maori sites of cultural significance to “rubbish dumps” has been deemed insensitive.

The item, which appeared on Story which du Plessis-Allan co-hosts with Duncan Garner, looked at how purchasers of Auckland homes near areas of cultural significance may need to get consent from iwi before undertaking structural building work.

During the piece du Plessis-Allan reported from an empty field.

“It’s where back in the old days Maori used to throw the shells when they’d finished eating their seafood. So it’s pretty much a rubbish dump.

“We looked it up – ‘midden’ is an old Danish word for ‘domestic rubbish dump’.”

Following the piece a member of the public, Ross Carter, complained to the Broadcasting Standards Authority (BSA) that it was racist and denigrating of Maori culture.

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Duncan Garner calls for a non-racist tobacco tax increase of 50%

Duncan Garner pulls no punches in dealing with the stupid suggestion that tobacco taxes are racist.

What a load of garbage that the tax on tobacco is racist.

Researcher Marewa Glover says the latest rounds of tax hikes are discriminatory because the tax hits Maori the hardest as they are traditionally low income and they too often smoke.

What a pile of ‘academic gobbledygook.’ Does that also make GST racist? GST at 15 percent on all goods and services hits poor Maori communities the hardest too. So do petrol taxes. So do the taxes on the first $20,000 of income.

Who really supports this ‘discrimination and racist’ line anyway?

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Anne Salmond: Violent Maori fathers only a recent phenomenon

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I agree with Alan Duff when he says, “Real men don’t beat up kids, or wives, or anyone else. Real men love.” I know that, as a child, he experienced domestic violence. I respect him as a writer and for his fantastic work with Books for Homes. I admire the passion with which he tackles the burning issue of child abuse among Maori and violence against women.

At the same time, when he suggests this hateful violence is a legacy of a “simple” pre-European Maori culture, with its “screaming, eye-popping haka”, he is wrong. In saying that, I realise I run the risk of being flagellated as a bleeding-heart liberal, or worse, by some of the Herald’s readers.

** cough **

Rather than appealing to scholarly authority, then, let’s turn to the accounts written by European men who visited New Zealand in the very early days and saw with their own eyes how Maori family life was conducted.

We can begin with the traveller John Savage, who wrote in 1807, “The children here appear to be treated with a great degree of parental affection. They are robust, lively, and possess, in general, pleasing countenances.”

Samuel Marsden, the leading missionary who visited New Zealand for the first time in 1814 (and could never be accused of possessing a bleeding heart), noted: “I saw no quarrelling while I was there. They are kind to their women and children. I never observed either with a mark of violence upon them, nor did I ever see a child struck.” Read more »

Alan Duff is right, real men don’t beat up kids

Alan Duff has another ripper in the Herald:

We can’t let Moko Rangitoheriri’s death be forgotten – or be a vengeful mob storming the Taupo police cells to lynch Moko’s evil killers.

One of many marches around the country took place in Lower Hutt and there were some brave men who spoke out. I quote Anaru Moke: “I was bashed myself. Who wasn’t?” He says he’s breaking the cycle with his own 11 children. He’s a Mob member. Good on him for speaking out. Here’s Star Olsen: “I knew I had to say something that was at the pit of my stomach. The hardest word for some Maori males to say is sorry.” Including when they just helped torture and murder a child.

It’s a waste of breath to scream that vile punishments should be inflicted on Tania Shailer, 26, and David Haerewa, 46. We’d just be drawn into an endless cycle of violence begetting more violence. But we Maori have to ask why we totally dominate statistics in the killing of more than 200 infants in the past two decades. Why us? The leaders – I mean the cowardly ones staying silent and not joining any of the marches, the ones flying business class to dubious “conferences” overseas – will never do anything to help change the significant percentage of Maori at the bottom of the heap from falling further down into the abyss.

Some Maori have no moral values because they’re not taught them. Violence is perfectly acceptable behaviour, indeed admired; whether it’s king-hitting a stranger in a pub, beating up the wife or partner, thrashing their children.

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Yes John, Mike is right – middle New Zealand has had a gutsful

It’s been a long time since my heart dropped to the floor as heavily as it did the night Mike Hosking declared middle New Zealand was opposed to Maori seats on local bodies. I’m blessed, or cursed, with boundless optimism for this country.

A small population, well educated and politically engaged, can do things that are much harder in a big democracy where even people of the dominant culture can feel powerless and excluded from the country’s decisions.

It is 25 years since Jim Bolger and Sir Doug Graham brought the National Party in behind Treaty settlements, nearly eight years since John Key formed an enduring partnership with the Maori Party. I have dared to think that conservative opinion has come around to accepting Maori have a distinctive place in our affairs and that we are better for it.

That’s Key’s view. Though strictly he didn’t need the Maori Party’s parliamentary votes, he wanted them in his ministry because, he said, “I just thought it would make us a better government.”

So I watched Seven Sharp’s item on the resigning Mayor of New Plymouth with a certain sadness. The poor fellow has had enough of the isolation and abuse he has received since he attempted to set up seats on his council for a Maori electorate. I don’t know Taranaki well but it appeared the country’s post-colonial project has yet to reach at least one of its extremities. Read more »