Maori

Perfect Angry Andy has to backtrack

The media have been repeating the mantra that Angry Andy had yet to stuff up.  This was during three weeks of parliament and two months of holidays.   Quite the test.

Little’s first formal outing for the year was at Waitangi, where he shattered his ‘perfect’ record.

Labour leader Andrew Little has watered down his comments about exploring greater Maori self-governance, referring today to examples such as co-governance of waterways rather than allowing Maori to legislate and govern themselves.

On Waitangi Day, Mr Little criticised Mr Key for dismissing a Waitangi Tribunal report that found Ngapuhi chiefs had not ceded their sovereignty by signing the Treaty.

Mr Little said that report found Maori had retained their ability to govern themselves, including law making abilities. While that was “highly problematic” it should be talked about. Read more »

Is Labour’s new policy to remove all water meters?

Andrew Little has developed a habit of blurting out ill-considered thoughts as though they are fully developed policy ideas.

He is of course pandering to the audience he is speaking to, but forgets that everything he says and does now is subject to media scrutiny.

His latest brain-fart amongst many is to suggest that water should not be a tradeable commodity.

Labour party leader Andrew Little says water should not be traded as a commodity in New Zealand.

Mr Little, who spoke at Te Tii Marae at Waitangi today, told media after his official address mixed feedback from iwi and the Government over water ownership rights was a reflection of wider conflicting views on the issue.

“Certainly, local people and local iwi – they want water and they want access to water because they need it,” Mr Little said.

“Whether or not it’s about making a profit from it, some have that view clearly but others don’t.

“I think…this is the big challenge we face as a country. There’s a long way to go yet and this is an issue that all New Zealanders need to be debating.    Read more »

Don Brash’s Orewa speech the media wouldn’t report

The other day Don Brash and Gareth Morgan fronted at Orewa. Contrary to the media reports it wasn’t actually the Orewa Rotary Club but only its premises that was used.

The media reported extensively the nonsense that Gareth Morgan spouted but barely mentioned what Don Brash had to say.

So I called up Don and asked if I could publish his speech.


NOTES FOR REPLYING TO GARETH MORGAN, 4 FEBRUARY 2015

Thanks for inviting me here today, and for the opportunity to comment on what Gareth has said. I didn’t see the speech in advance of course, so these comments are just immediate reactions based partly on what Gareth said a few days ago in a speech to a Ngapuhi audience.

Let me say first that there are some of Gareth’s views with which I agree. He said in his Ngapuhi speech that he is opposed to separate Maori electorates, Maori wards (and by implication the Maori Statutory Board in Auckland) and quotas for Maori in educational institutions. Granting any group special rights is contrary to Article 3 of the Treaty he said, and I totally agree with that.

It’s also patronising, and implies that Maori aren’t quite competent enough to have their voices heard in the political arena without a special leg up. Of course that is nonsense: when I was in Parliament, there were 21 Maori in Parliament – roughly the same percentage of Members of Parliament as Maori are in the wider population – only seven of them elected in the Maori electorates. The other 14 were elected in general constituencies or were placed in a winnable position on a party’s list.

Similarly in Auckland: the first election of councillors after the super-city was established in 2010 saw three people of Maori descent elected – not in Maori wards but on their own merits – and again three Maori out of a total of 20 councillors meant that Maori on the Council were in roughly the same proportion as Maori in the general population.

But as explained in his Ngapuhi speech his basic position seems to be that –

“.. the Treaty is whatever a reasonable person’s view of the following four taken together leads them to – not any one taken in isolation, but all taken together:

  • Treaty of Waitangi
  • Te Tiriti O Waitangi
  • Principles of the Treaty
  • Post-1975 Consensus on the Treaty.”

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Remarkable Maori racism on display

The Race Relations Commissioner has called on organisers of a basketball tournament to allow a teenage girls’ team to play after they were refused entry because their coach wasn’t Maori.

Basketball coach Andrew McKay said it was unfair to his under 17s team who were barred from this week’s National Maori Basketball Tournament after a rule change meant even coaches and management had to be Maori to enter.

Mr McKay coached a Ngati Whakaue team which won the under-15 division at last year’s tournament in Rotorua.

But his application in October to enter the same team in the under-17 grade for this week’s competition, which starts today, was initially declined by the organisers because he was non-Maori.

A clause that all coaching and management personnel must provide whakapapa to an iwi — or state tribal links — was added to the online entry forms after he had applied, he said. Read more »

Tagged:

Just who do these pricks think they are?

We can all thank Len Brown from ruining one of the best free night time attractions in Auckland. Driving up Mt Eden to look at the view at night.

Some unelected bunch of Maori stand over merchants have decided unilaterally to change the closing hours for Mt Eden and other mountains to 8:30pm instead of the previous 11:00pm.

About 70 cars were trapped on one of Auckland’s most popular tourist attractions last night after the gates were shut early.

People who ventured up the mountain said they were outraged when they were told to pay $40 to leave.

Some motorists were trapped up the maunga for two hours and criticised the Auckland Council’s lack of consistency on publicising closure times.

The Mt Eden-Maungawhau gates were chained off after 8.30pm.

Access to the summit closes at 11pm every day, the council’s website said this morning.

[…]

An A4-sized sign with the new closure times was stuck to a pole on the right-hand side of the road, Shaw said.

It was not well-lit, making it difficult for his wife, who was driving, to see, he said.

Motorists were told they could leave if they paid a $40 fine, Shaw said.

He assumed he would receive the $40 fine in the mail, “which to me is not on”.

Security guards took down registration details of the motorists, he said.

Another motorist trapped on the maunga said the new sign was blocked from view by vegetation.

They were allowed to leave after two hours.

“Hopefully the future forced imprisonment of tax-paying citizens and tourists on one of Auckland’s major landmarks will be resolved more efficiently since it seems gate-closing times are entirely arbitrary,” the motorist said.

Read more »

Face of the day

David Rankin

David Rankin

David Rankin is an interesting person to do a google search on.

He has talked about the possibility of Maori not being indigenous in 2012

The status of Maori as the country’s indigenous population could be in danger if research, which suggests previous civilisations lived in New Zealand before Maori arrived, is proved true.

Ngapuhi leader David Rankin said books by authors such as investigative journalist Ian Wishart and historian Noel Hilliam presented “clear evidence” that some of New Zealand’s earliest residents might have arrived before the Polynesians.

He pointed to numerous Maori oral histories which referred to people being here when the first Maori arrived, including fair-skinned people.

“If we believe our histories, then we as Maori are not the indigenous people of New Zealand.”

The archaeological evidence in some research was a potential challenge to the status of Maori as indigenous, which was why he believed no other Maori was prepared to speak publicly on the issue, Mr Rankin said.

Details of much of the country’s past was being concealed by academic historians, he said.

“I would say it’s a conspiracy. They are worried that their own research will be exposed so they have worked hard to ridicule and suppress any Maori history which disagrees with their views.

“However, the tide is turning and more people are now seeing that there is a whole history of our country that has been concealed and which will have major implications for Treaty settlements for example.”

-NZHerald

Read more »

Will Rotorua be next to force unelected Maori “representatives” on ratepayers?

On Thursday there is possibly a vote, pushed by Labour hack, Steve Chadwick, to put Te Arawa representatives on Rotorua Lakes Council.

It will be a very explosive issue. A few councillors and a previous candidate have created a group to oppose the move:

Six months ago, at the Mayor’s instigation, a “Te Arawa Partnership Plan” proposed to give the iwi two unelected representatives on the Rotorua District Council, plus 50% control of the Resource Management Committee and their own parallel administration. The plan was flatly rejected by Rotorua ratepayers. Council officials have since provided finance and staff to support several hui, the most recent on 14 December 2014.

With respect, we invited Te Arawa to reaffirm the principles of democracy.

In recent times the Council, with the support of the Mayor, has increasingly paid lip service to due process and pushed through numerous decisions and changes to delegations about discretionary spending. So, we may ask, where to from here?

Given the Mayor’s progressively unilateral decision making, and recent announcements, it is clear she will ram through her preferred model of representation at the last meeting of the year on 18 December, hoping that the political fallout will fade over Christmas. Such tactics would be ill advised and will most likely backfire. Many Councillors have recently come to the conclusion that this Council has over-stepped the mark with the lack of due process. The lack of authentic consultation prior to controversial near split-vote decisions is creating a legacy of division in our community. Ramming through unelected representation will push the boundaries of democracy, and once again, divide our district. Public tolerance of such behaviour is fading.

Read more »

Giving the wahine the bash still a national sport for Maori

Maori women are more likely to become assault victims than other New Zealanders, police data shows.

Recorded crime victim statistics, recently released by police, showed about one in five assault victims in the last four months was a Maori woman. Yet they make up just 7 per cent of the population.

A family member, such as a partner, ex-partner, parent or sibling, was the most likely person to carry out the assault.

The figures, previously only available to police and some policy makers, show the various permutations of crime and its victims.

For Europeans, Asians and Indians, men were more likely to be assaulted than women, but for Pacific Islanders and Maori, women were more likely to be victims.

Family violence rates for Pacific Islanders were almost double those of Europeans and Asians. Maori were not far behind.

That Maori women were over-represented in crime victimhood statistics was not surprising, Victim Support chief executive Kevin Tso said.

“It’s very indicative of the stats we’ve seen and the work we actually engage in,” he said.

Trends were not always easy to determine, but the victimisation of Maori women had emerged in other research, including the recently released Glenn Inquiry.

It was something Victim Support dealt with every day.

“This topic . . . goes to the core of our New Zealand demographic and cultural issues in our society,” Tso said.

Regional figures showed race-based victimisation was widespread.

Once were Warriors.
Read more »

Tax on stupid people tops $2billion p.a.

The stupidity tax that is applied to gambling has reached $2 billion per annum.

I thank the fools for voluntarily contributing to society…we need more taxes like this one.

More than $2 billion is thought to be lost to gambling annually in New Zealand, but the number engaged in regular gambling has dropped off.

In 2012, researchers from AUT University and the National Research Bureau conducted the largest gambling survey since 1999, with 6251 adults taking part. The results have just been made public.

“The most notable finding was a substantial drop in the number of people who gamble weekly or more.   Read more »

Muppet Mayor Mandates Maori quota

These muppets never give in, it is bad enough in Auckland having unelected Maori board members lording it over us all, but now the Mayor of New Plymouth is proposing that all councils have 50% of council seats allocated to Maori.

It is breathtaking racism and wonky thinking.

I doubt he will be mayor for long.

New Plymouth mayor Andrew Judd has taken his fight for Maori representation a step further, calling for a law change so up to half of all councillors in New Zealand are Maori.

Judd, already fighting critics over his council’s plans to create a Maori ward, believes there should be more Maori representation across the country to better reflect the Treaty of Waitangi.

“The reasonable interpretation of the Treaty is that you would have fifty-fifty representation around the table,” Judd said.

“We should be incorporating the Maori perspective around council tables, and ultimately that would mean up to half the representation each.”  Read more »