Maurice Williamson

Guess who won Massey University’s Quote of the Year competition?

Massey University held its usual Quote of the Year competition recently, and one of my quotes from the election campaign and Dirty Politics was a finalist.

The finalist quotes were:

I’m sorry for being a man. (David Cunliffe‚Äôs unusual apology at Labour’s domestic violence policy launch at a Women’s Refuge forum)

We think it’s, um, pretty legal. (Steven Joyce asked by reporters about the use of a song for the National election campaign that sounded very similar to one by Eminen)

You work in news you puffed up little shit!…When will you glove puppets of Cameron Slater just piss off?¬†(Internet Party press secretary Pam Corkery at a campaign event, when the media kept asking for an interview with Kim Dotcom)

It was all steam and no hangi. (Te Tai Tokerau MP Kelvin Davis describing Internet-Mana after it failed to deliver on the hype on election day)

He could probably survive shooting little kittens in his garden with a shotgun. (Kim Dotcom on how little impact Dirty Politics had on Prime Minister John Key’s approval ratings.

I play politics like Fijians play rugby. My role is smashing your face into the ground. (Whale Oil blogger Cameron Slater after Nicky Hager’s book Dirty Politics was released)

I did not have textual relations with that blogger. (Spoof of John Key’s initial denial that he had received texts from Whale Oil blogger Cameron Slater tweeted by Lloyd Burr of RadioLive)

It terrifies me how much of our economy is stuck inside a dairy cow. (Comedian Te Radar talking to farmers at Fieldays)

Get past the breath-taking PR snow job. (Former CERA communications adviser Tina Nixon describing the press conference to announce the resignation of chief executive Roger Sutton after a sexual harassment complaint)

No more beersies for you. (Tagline in this year’s Health Promotion Agency advertising campaign to reduce harmful alcohol consumption.)

Guess which quote has won. ¬† Read more »

Will John Key hold himself to the same standards he held Maurice Williamson to?

Whale Oil Blogger Cameron Slater Portrait Session

The other day in parliament John Key stated that when he spoke to me it wasn’t in his capacity as Prime Minister.

This is interesting because one of the reasons he sacked Maurice Williamson was because of the fact that he was a minister and that you are ALWAYS a minister.

It didn’t matter to him then that Maurice Williamson wrote his letters or made his phone calls in his capacity as a local MP.

Not one bit.¬† Read more »

A house divided, and a house that will fall

quote-a-house-divided-against-itself-cannot-stand-abraham-lincoln-112610

Labour’s leadership contender says Labour’s house is divided.

Well duh!

We’ve known that since Helen Clark departed, and so have the voters. It doesn’t take a rocket scientists to see it.

Labour’s acting leader David Parker has confirmed that he will be entering a bid for the Party leadership.

Announcing his bid in Auckland this afternoon, Mr Parker said he will restore the party’s focus, passion and drive so it can become a unifying force for New Zealanders.

He said he had been approached by New Zealanders “from all walks of life” in the past 10 days asking him to stand.

“In less than two years the New Zealand Labour Party will mark its centenary – its 100th birthday.

“I am simply not prepared to let this milestone become a tombstone.

“A tombstone for a once great party that once did great things for New Zealand.”

If successful in his bid, Mr Parker said he would review all of Labour’s policies.

“We lost badly and I get it.”

Mr Parker said Labour needed to get its house in order.

“History teaches us a house divided against itself cannot stand.

“All of us claim to be able to unite the caucus and the party.

“From unity comes strength. Unity also brings confidence – and success.

“I believe I am that leader.”

Read more »

Labour interfering in Police operations

Labour are meddling in Police operations, with temporary leader David Parker suggesting all sorts of things.

Wasn’t it just a few months ago they were demanding the resignation of Maurice Williamson for meddling in Police operations?

Labour’s acting leader David Parker says he believes Nicky Hager has a journalist’s right to protect his sources and questioned whether a 10 hour search of Mr Hager’s home amounted to intimidation of the media.

Mr Parker said while he respected the independence of the police, it was crucial journalists were not forced to reveal their sources and Police needed to tread carefully to ensure those rights are not breached. The Evidence Act gives journalists rights to protect information that may reveal their sources.

“While we respect the Police’s independence we are concerned that an arm of the state appears to be being used against Mr Hager while nothing appears to be being done about the wrongdoing he exposed. A 10-hour search of their family home would be harrowing for anyone.

“Nicky Hager was doing that the fourth estate ought to do and police need to take care to protect his rights and to avoid the appearance of intimidating the media.”

Read more »

#Teamkey diaspora hits Auckland

qweq

After the conference/launch, it appears Maurice and Jami-Lee were allowed to take the #TeamKey yoof for a milkshake ride in the Big Blue Bus.  They duly unpacked outside of Pakuranga shopping centre.

Nice of JLR to help the elderly.

asdas

Read more »

Has Scott Simpson been advising Colin Craig?

Looks like it.

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Stories making headlines around the regions today include vandals targeting Colin Craig’s election signs in Tauranga and a Wanganui teenager sentenced to write an essay for drink driving.

Conservative leader¬†Colin Craig’s election signs¬†have become the first casualty of vandalism in the lead up to the election in Tauranga.

Read more »

ACT still on National life support – Whyte to take on safe National seat

ACT Party leader Jamie Whyte is going to stand in Pakuranga for the September general election.

He says he’s going to campaign for the party vote only and use his candidate status to get ACT’s policies across to voters.

“Those policies will go a long way to making Pakuranga more prosperous and its streets and homes safer,” he said.

“A low flat tax, getting tough on crime, and one country, one law.”

Pakuranga is one of the safest National seats in the country.

Maurice Williamson retained it with a 13,846 majority in 2011.

You could theorise this two ways ¬† Read more »

Did the opposition forget all their attacks on Maurice Williamson?

I see we have various politicians now arguing that Murray McCully should have intervened in this case both with the police and with MFaT.

Former Labour Party Foreign Affairs Minister Phil Goff told Radio New Zealand Mr McCully had to explain why there was such an “extraordinary indifference or incompetence” by him and the Ministry in dealing with the matter.

“Speaking as a former foreign minister I know for a fact in an extraordinary situation like this, the minister would be right on top of the issue.

“He would be having daily negotiations and discussions through his chief executive officer in the ministry – the matter would never have been able to drift as this has been allowed to drift.”

It seemed Mr McCully was more interested in sweeping the issue under the carpet than taking the matter up and seeing justice done for the alleged offence, Mr Goff said.

The Malaysian Government would be embarrassed that one of their nationals had allegedly behaved illegally, he said. ¬† Read more »

Herald Editorial on attacks against them for bias

The Labour party is demanding an apology from the NZ Herald, their paid staffers who blog anonymously at The Standard are running a campaign of letter writing and bullying against the Herald and this morning they responded…by saying diddums.

It is common in election years for political parties under pressure to attempt to shoot the messenger. In 2005, the¬†Herald¬†was stridently criticised and accused of bias by National supporters for our reportage of Dr Don Brash and the Exclusive Brethren. In 2008 it was the turn of Winston Peters and his New Zealand First people to call for resignations of the editor and political editor for the inconvenient revelation of funding from millionaire Owen Glenn, despite his “No” sign. Last election it was National partisans again, livid at the¬†Herald on Sunday¬†and¬†Heraldfor John Key and John Banks talking openly before a microphone accidentally left on their “cup of tea” table in a cafe.

This year it is the turn of Labour and its leader, David Cunliffe, incensed at reporting on the donations to the party and its MPs by the controversial Chinese migrant Donghua Liu — and that party’s connections to him.

Mr Cunliffe is considering unspecified legal options against the Herald. Party supporters have weighed in with accusations of political bias and complicated right-wing conspiracies.

The noise obscures the validity of the¬†Herald‘s reporting.

I don’t think the Herald is inherently biased. The Donghua Liu story shows that. Some staff may well be biased, but the Herald as a whole is not…though it has taken a more left wing slant in recent years. There is nothing wrong with that…the audience will leave and something new will come along, that is the way of media.¬† Read more »

Southland Times editorial on Cunliffe

The Southland Times says that David Cunliffe has only himself to blame:

There’s a Watergate-era poster of Richard Nixon as a wee boy, looking back over his own shoulder and complaining: Somebody poohed my pants.

David Cunliffe is scarcely more plausible as he tries to represent himself as the victim of a Government smear campaign.

He is conspicuously besmirched, all right, but however much the Government may have benefited from the process, enjoyed it, and perhaps even at prime ministerial level taken Bonaparte’s advice not to interrupt an opponent when he’s making a mistake, none of this changes the fact the Government’s role was, at very worst, peripheral to the self-inflicted damage.

Cunliffe was guilty of the same offences he had loftily criticised. His accusations against Maurice Williamson for meddling with a police investigation into Donghua Liu, a party donor, turned rancid when it emerged that he had himself written in support of Liu on a residency matter, which he initially denied. And Liu had donated to Labour as well as National. ¬† Read more »