Politics

Some good advice for Labour, pity they aren’t listening

John Armstrong offers up some good advice for LAbour as they continue to pursue Judith Collins. Little do Labour know they are being set up, if only they would do a little bit of research would they realise how far down the set up track they have propelled themselves in chasing false leads, rumour and innuendo.

The only funny part about it all is that Winston Peters is the one who set them up and Labour are the ones suffering at the hands of voters as a result.

The Prime Minister took the rather unusual step of offering free advice to Labour yesterday. It was advice Labour would do well to heed. But it is unlikely to do so. At least not yet.

The gist of John Key’s message to Labour went something like this. “Make my day. In fact, make my election day. If you want to continue to rate below 30 per cent in the polls, just keep talking about the things that do not matter. Just keep doing that until election day.”

Among the things that do not matter – according to Key – is Labour’s pursuit of Judith Collins and who she did or did not have dinner with in Beijing six months ago and what she did or did not tell New Zealand’s ambassador afterwards.    Read more »

Roy Morgan delivers a nice easter present for National

After yesterday’s Roy Morgan poll perhaps Labour might just start realising that no one cares about their silly pursuit of Judith Collins and voters simply believe that they are unfit to govern.

The poll delivers a shock for Labour, this is their favoured indicator, and proves the lie that Labour’s own internal polling is showing them at 34%.

Playing the nasty and not focussing on policies that matter to Kiwi voters is really starting to hurt them. But they are now past the point of no return for David Cunliffe and have to stick it out with a naff leader that no one likes or no one believes.

When you add on these results to the dramatic boundary changes you are going to see Labour MPs disappear back to their electorates in an attempt to shore up their own support. Watch as Ruth Dyson, Clayton Cosgrove and a number of other MPs spend considerably more time in their electorates than in Wellington.

Today’s New Zealand Roy Morgan Poll shows a large jump in support for National (48.5%, up 5.5%) now with its largest lead over a potential Labour/Greens alliance (40%, down 5%) since July 2013 as New Zealanders celebrated the visit of Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge.

Support for Key’s Coalition partners is little changed with the Maori Party 1% (down 0.5%), ACT NZ (0.5%, unchanged) and United Future 0% (down 0.5%).  Read more »

What? No crisis anymore?

Oh dear…Labour launches their ClusterTruck policy early in the week  on nationwide television with a proud and beaming David Cunliffe, and by the weeks end issue a flat press release talking about their “upgrade” for manufacturing.

What sort of a strategist announces a policy for manufacturing the eve of a long weekend holiday?

The funny thing is there isn’t a single mention of the crisis that never was in manufacturing that Labour banged on about endlessly.

Steven Joyce has joined in on the kicking:

Labour’s so called ‘Manufacturing Policy’ once again reheats the same old tired economic policies that would take New Zealand back to the dark days of high inflation, sluggish growth and low-job prospects, Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce says.

“Labour is stubbornly determined to continue to manufacture a crisis in manufacturing when one simply doesn’t exist,” Mr Joyce says.

“As the latest BNZ-Business New Zealand Performance on Manufacturing Index shows, manufacturing has been expanding for the last 19 consecutive months and 14,300 more jobs were added in the last year. Manufacturing activity is at the highest level since 2006Read more »

Labour’s clustertruck policy is total carnage

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When Labour last attacked truckies there was a nationwide blockade of the nations towns and cities. On that day they al drove ont he left hand side letting people transit as they protested.

Truckies by and large are courteous drivers. But LAbour continues to attack them.

Labour’s policy this time though is a sham. Of the 11,000km of NZ roads their policy will affect just 60kms, mostly in Auckland. Their claims of people fed up with holiday traffic held up by trucks are fanciful, and anyone who lives in Auckland knows the problems aren’t the trucks at holiday time…it is the crappy roads, roading choke points and people towing boats and caravans that hold people up.

Still, Labour thought this was a winner, and a more spectacular policy cock up I haven’t seen in many a year.  Read more »

No news today – just Labour continuing to be hypocritical

Labour, and particularly Shane Jones, are shameless with the brouhaha over a fundraising dinner John Key attended organised by the Maori Party.

Back in October, wasn’t it Labour selling access to MPs at its party conference?

Their conference material offered:

 An opportunity to meet 1:1 in a short meeting with your choice (subject to availability) of Members of Parliament and senior Party officials (further information regarding this will be sent to you on payment).

I think we need to step back and consider very carefully Labour’s stance on this.

Paying to go for a dinner where you’ll likely  get some face time with John Key = bad/evil

Paying to meet one-on-one Labour MPs = just fine.  Read more »

Perhaps Gareth Morgan should take note of this

Gareth Morgan famously rode his motorcycle through the Potemkin villages of NOrth Korea, proclaiming the whole country to be enlightened and not as reported outside of the country.

The man is an idiot. There is ample evidence of the lack of freedom and deprivations suffered by the people of North Korea under the Kim regime.

Yeonmi Park spoke to Australia’s SBS about her defection from North Korea.

I lived in North Korea for the first 15 years of my life, believing Kim Jong-il was a god. I never doubted it because I didn’t know anything else. I could not even imagine life outside of the regime.

It was like living in hell. There were constant power outages, so everything was dark. There was no transportation – everyone had to walk everywhere. It was very dirty and no one could eat anything.

It was not the right conditions for human life, but you couldn’t think about it, let alone complain about it. Even though you were suffering, you had to worship the regime every day.

I had to be careful of my thoughts because I believed Kim Jong-il could read my mind. Every couple of days someone would disappear. A classmate’s mother was punished in a public execution that I was made to attend. I had no choice – there were spies in the neighbourhood.

My father worked for the government, so for a while things were relatively OK for me compared with some others in North Korea. But my father was accused of doing something wrong and jailed for three years. He being guilty made me guilty too, so whatever future I had in North Korea completely disappeared. I could no longer go to university, and my family was forced to move out of Pyongyang to the countryside on the border close to China.

After a few years, my father became very sick with cancer and he came out of jail for treatment. During this time, we decided to leave North Korea.

We had to cross a frozen river in the middle of winter to sneak across the border into China. I was very scared – not of being caught but of being shot. If they see someone escaping, they don’t ask, they just shoot them.  Read more »

The toxic Greens

David Cunliffe needs the Greens to make him PM.

However his focus groups and internal polling are showing that the voters are nervous, especially about the toxic Greens. Which is why he won’t say publicly that he needs them.

That’s why there’s been this pretend break up.

Winston’s worked that out, even if Bryce Edwards can’t;

Read more »

Green taliban aids in destruction of pristine landscape for a cycleway

Yesterday Russel Norman attacked the government for wanting to bulldoze tracks through pristine forest.

So the Green Party moans about the government wanting to mine in Ecological Areas, but we can reveal that they are right behind an American property developer called Mr Marion Boatwright and his promotion of the Old Ghost Rd cycleway as a means of getting tourists to pass by his lodge in the lower Mokihinui River.

This coincided with Solid Energy’s desire to push a road thru an Ecological Area and John Key’s National Cycleway Project Te Hauranga, which was launched at the beginning of the recession to mop up unemployment.

The Old Ghost Road [OGR]  was begun with a minimum of assessment and no proper budget.

So far it has cost about $5 million, plus an extra $800,000 from DOC and it is far from finished – probably needs $2 million more.

The main drivers of the project are Solid Energy’s Phil Rossiter and Mr Boatwright, with some smart PR work from Boatwrights (ex?) partner Susan Cooke, a former Press reporter.  Read more »

Cunliffe had to do it, the Greens are toxic

David Cunliffe has been forced into distancing him and Labour somewhat from the Greens.

Audrey Young reports:

Labour yesterday rebuffed a proposal by the Green Party to present both parties as a coalition Government in waiting during in the run-up to the September 20 election.

Labour co-leader David Cunliffe indicated that such a pre-election arrangement could have posed problems with post-election negotiations with other parties, such as New Zealand First.

The Greens never had a formal coalition with the three-term Helen Clark Government, sufficing with a less extensive support agreement and no ministers.

Mr Cunliffe told the Herald tonight he envisaged that Labour would try to negotiate a formal coalition agreement with the Greens after the election, but until then he would be referring to a “Labour-led Government,” not a “Labour-Greens Government” – or a “Green-Labour Government” which had also been raised.

“I’m the leader of the Labour Party and my job is to maximize the Labour Party vote,” he said.

“The Labour Party will be the core of the incoming Government working co-operatively with the Green Party who are our longstanding friends.

But Labour would quite possibly be working with other parties as well “and whatever the coalition arrangements are, they need to be able to spread across more than two parties.”

He said it was important to maximize the reach “all the way from the greenest end of the green spectrum right to the political centre and cross-over voters and in order to do that, it is important that they have their brand and we have our brand, and they have their policies and we have our policies.”  Read more »

Inside the Labour party war room

Yesterday the Nats published a version of the Labour Party’s ‘war room’ white board.

10245589_857379817610948_111107149884583744_n-1 Read more »