Politics

Another pinko journalist doesn’t get the message about Andrew Little

What do you mean I need a media person?

What do you mean I need a media person?

Over the last few weeks we have looked closely at Andrew Little, and his speaking style.

As usual the left have said I am critical because he is Labour leader, not because it is an honestly held belief that he is dead set useless.

He hems and haws and bobs and weaves and can’t deliver a decent speech. He is wooden, loses his voice, and gets shouty.  Read more »

The Green Party in the UK are “spiteful, malicious toddlers”

The Green party are the same the world over.

Their members are well meaning if somewhat deluded, but the politicians and parties themselves are crazy lunatics who have blood on their hands through their disastrous policies.

The Green party is having a bit of a surge in the UK at the moment and they are the real danger rather than the UKIP.

People are starting to wake up.

Reading the depressing news from Greece this morning, most Britons would be forgiven for imagining: “Couldn’t happen here.” A not-terribly-post-Communist politician is about to become prime minister, by promising that which is both arithmetically and politically impossible.

Well: beware Greeks bearing nonsense on stilts. Couldn’t happen here? Look again. Britain already elects Green Party representatives who can make Syriza seem like the thoughtful mainstream. Welcome to the city of Brighton and Hove, where the Green Party has been in power since the 2011 council elections.

[…]

Syriza’s leader named his son in honour of Che Guevara? That’s nothing. Here’s Ben Duncan, at the time the Green Party councillor for Queen’s Park ward, on June 28 last year, tweeting about a memorial to the Armed Forces: “Armed Forces Day has certainly brought the hired killers onto the streets of #Brighton today. Hard to explain to my son!”

It certainly would be hard to explain to a son why he shouldn’t spit in such a father’s face, but I don’t think that was Mr Duncan’s suggestion. The local Green Party asked him to resign as a Green, or something – they have no formal whipping system – but he remains a councillor, and, as far as I can tell, continues to “work” for Green MEP Jean Lambert for which we – the taxpaying “we” – pay him something like thirty grand a year.

Brighton voters will have been less surprised than most, then, to hear Natalie Bennett, the Greens’ national leader, rhapsodising over her plans to convert the Army into some sort of counselling service.

That’s the thing about the Greens. They react in horror when one of their footsoldiers is caught being explicit over an idea – soldiers=killers, for example – to which their national policy is hardly antithetical. The only substantive difference I can see between Duncan and Bennett is that he was caught sneering, while she’s still allowed to pretend the drivel in her manifesto is just light-hearted, and “fresh and new”, as she put it at the weekend.

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Len can’t control rates, has broken his promises, time for him to go

When spending gets out of control its symptomatic of bigger deeper problems and there are surely serious problems with Auckland Council that need to be addressed.

The Council is like a crack addict and is unable to see where it is going wrong. Spending is completely out of control and massive rates increases loom. 5.5% this year will almost certainly blow out to 7 or 8% because the Council has a habit of instigating projects that don’t keep to budgets. Like the ballooning computer IT spend up that’s now $100m over budget.

Household rates could rise by 7.6 per cent this year if the city adopts a motorway toll of $2 or a regional fuel tax to tackle the city’s transport challenges.

The Auckland Council today releases a draft 10-year budget for public consultation, which includes some difficult choices on the costs and services of the Super City.

Among the options are paying less for transport and getting less, or a scheme involving a motorway toll or a fuel tax to raise $300 million a year to fill a $12 billion transport funding gap over 30 years.

The council is considering a targeted rate this year until revenue from tolls, a fuel tax or higher rates is in place by about 2018.

In the meantime, about $1.7 billion of $3.4 billion of additional transport projects over the next 10 years will be funded by debt.

Council finance officer Matthew Walker said the targeted rate would collect $30 million this year, the equivalent of a 2 per cent rise in rates, to fund the revenue shortfall.

This would raise the overall rates increase from 3.5 per cent to 5.5 per cent.

Household rates would increase on average from 5.6 per cent to 7.6 per cent.

New valuations and a lowering of business rates has led to higher rates for households.

The latest figures show inflation is just 0.8 per cent.

An extra 2 per cent rates increase would take the rates on a $750,000 home from $2274 to $2319 and for a $1 million home from $2904 to $2962.

Mr Walker said the $30 million targeted rate could become $60 million in year two and $90 million in year three and so on.

This scenario would see household rates rise by 22 per cent over three years.

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Special Housing Areas a total failure

The Special Housing Areas are failing and yet nobody is asking why?

The Government’s Auckland Housing Accord aims to relieve the city’s desperate housing shortage with 39,000 new homes, but only 350 residences have so far been built in the plan’s Special Housing Areas, an official has revealed.

Of those, only 20 have been a direct result of the housing accord.

Labour is accusing developers and landbankers of sitting on their hands and watching the value of their land increase instead of working to ease the crisis. Auckland Council has warned it could take action if building does not take place quickly.

I happen to know that the reason is deliberate and the perpetrators aren’t developers and landbankers, it is the Auckland Council.

Council doesn’t want greenfield subdivisions – that’s the polar opposite to their fundamental core beliefs and desires for a compact city.   Read more »

Labour in the UK declares a crisis in energy…problem now solved

Oh dear lord, it seems Ed Miliband has David Cunliffe and the NZ Labour party advising them.

They are even mimicking declaring a crisis for particular industries and just like in New Zealand they have tried to come up with their own power solution.

It has of course been widely mocked.

Labour’s flagship energy price freeze was branded ‘a joke’ last night, as senior figures in the party confirmed it has been reviewed in the light of falling prices.

The price freeze, which Mr Miliband pledged would last until 2017, has been thrown into turmoil in recent weeks as a slump in the price of oil saw the prospect of falling energy prices.

The Daily Mail revealed yesterday that Labour is conducting a U-turn on the policy, which was launched by Ed Miliband in 2013.

It has now been ‘re-branded’ as a price cap, which will allow bills to fall to reflect tumbling wholesale prices.

Yesterday E.On became the first Big Six firm to offer a cut in gas prices of 3.5 per cent to its customers, and others are expected to follow suit.  Read more »

Paid to Win – Simon Lusk’s Guide to Campaigning Part II Which Party?

Simon Lusk is one of the few full time political campaigners in New Zealand, and is releasing a practical guide to campaigning in New Zealand, “Paid to Win“, one chapter at a time.

His second chapter is titled “Which Party” and gives advice on which party aspiring politicians or political activists should join.

This chapter deals with which party to join, why minor parties never effect real change, why a safe seat matters, and other factors in deciding when and where a candidate should run.

Simon’s views on the likelihood of a successful career in a minor party are spot on, and while the Greens will howl with rage his comments about them are spot on.

When I first started getting to know good political operators inside Labour I mentioned that Labour had an inherent advantage because they had the Greens.

Under MMP National do not have any strong coalition partners, while Labour have the Greens.

The response to this statement was telling. I was asked emphatically, “Have you ever worked with the Greens?” I had not, but filed this away for future reference.  Read more »

Chris Christie’s presidential hopes are dead

Chris Christie’s presidential hopes are stuffed, there is little chance he will gain the Republican nomination after moving to introduce tougher gun control laws.

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s (R) administration is proposing more gun control in the form of “security requirements” for firearm retailers, wholesalers, manufacturers–and employees of the same–in the state.

The proposals originated with the State Police and are the result of “several thefts and lapses in oversight…that led to at least one death” during the past 10 years.   Read more »

Agreeing with Chris Trotter about online voting

There are plenty of fools out there who think that electronic voting is nirvana, that it will engage the yoof to vote and increase participation in our democracy.

I disagree, and so does Chris Trotter. Electronic voting won’t deliver what proponents say it will, in fact it is likely to increase distrust in the voting process.

There are already conspiracy theorists out there who think John Key rigs ballot boxes, imagine if there was electronic voting, you’d ahve accusations of Merril Lynch funding the software company from the time of John Key’s involvement and therefore the process must be corrupt.

DEREK HANDLEY bubbles over with faith in the future. As a precocious inductee to the Silicon Alley Hall of Fame, he is blazingly confident that capitalism, information technology and the entrepreneurial spirit are never going to encounter a challenge they cannot rise to – or overcome.

Like the failure of close to half of New Zealand citizens aged under 30 to engage in the electoral process.

On this subject Mr Handley is typically forthright:

“Everybody under 30 has grown up with the internet and mobile devices to do practically everything online yet they still can’t vote online. [This has resulted] in an entire generation being pushed to the sidelines of democracy not because they don’t care, but because it hasn’t kept up with them.”

Setting aside Mr Handley’s bubbly confidence in all things “online”, this is utter tosh. An “entire generation” has not been “pushed to the sidelines of democracy”, they have ambled there entirely of their own accord. Not only do they not “care” about democracy, but an alarming number of them would also struggle to tell you what it is.

In my opinion Derek Handley is a jumped up pretentious tosspot. My dearly departed grandfather once commented (ok it was a lot) that empty vessels make the most noise. This is Derek Handley.

Trotter is dead right about the dead set useless yoof who let themselves become disengaged in democracy.

Far from democracy failing to keep up with the needs of the younger generation, one out of every two New Zealanders under 30 has failed conspicuously to keep up with the most fundamental facts of political life.

The most important of these is that politics (and elections) are activities to be participated in collectively – not individually. The moment this central fact of political life is forgotten, the logic of participation collapses in on itself.

A recent article by Fairfax journalists Paul Easton and Simon Day vividly illustrates what happens when the prospect of casting a vote is viewed through an individualistic, as opposed to a collectivist, lens.

Asked why he didn’t vote, Johnny, aged 20, and described simply as “dad”, declared:

“I didn’t see the point. My life is good as it is. I don’t like John Key, but I thought he was going to get in anyway so I didn’t vote. I would vote if it meant getting stuff I was keen for.”

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Gareth comes good, and not by wanting to nail more cats

About the only thing I agree with Gareth Morgan on is his desire to have the cat population of NZ killed.

Now there is another thing I can agree with him on.

The need for the Greens to change.

Since the election, several high profile commentators – including the businessman, Gareth Morgan – have suggested the Greens ditch some of their left-leaning policies.

Radio New Zealand invited Mr Morgan to take part in a discussion panel along with the Greens’ co-leader Metiria Turei and her predecessor Jeanette Fitzsimons.

Mr Morgan argued that the Green Party’s stance means they could only ever go into Government with Labour.

“I want to see the environment represented inside the tent. I don’t want the environment to have about a 50 percent chance of being in power.”

He said many middle-of-the-road voters cared about the environment but won’t vote for the Green Party because of its more left-wing policies.

Mr Morgan said the Greens should ditch their left-wing policies and focus solely on the environment, so they can hold whoever is in power to account.

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Watch The Leaked Kim Jong-Un Death Scene From ‘The Interview’

kim-jong-un

The part of ‘The Interview’ the North Koreans didn’t want you to see, but now can because it has been leaked.

Sony caved to the terrorists but the Streisand Effect is now in effect.

Mashable gives some background.

You won’t be seeing The Interview anytime soon, but the 28 seconds that most enraged North Korea, and may very well have doomed the film to oblivion, hit the Internet on Thursday. Though dozens of websites embedded the clip early, they began coming down by late afternoon.

The scene is the film’s climax, and it’s funnier if you know the background: Earlier in The Interview, James Franco’s character Dave Skylark bonds with Kim Jong-un over their mutual love of Katy Perry — particularly the song “Firework” — as they drive around in the supreme leader’s personal tank.

But Skylark later comes to realize that the dictator is truly evil and, in the midst of a chaotic showdown, jumps in the tank as a means to escape. With Kim’s military helicopter bearing down on him, Skylark takes aim at the aircraft from the tank’s turret. As he lets the shell fly, we hear dramatic strains of “Firework” firing up.

And that’s where the 28-second clip, in extreme slow-motion, picked up. We saw Kim Jong-Un leaning out the door of his helicopter, watching the shell pierce the side of the aircraft and explode in a ball of fire. With his mouth agape, the Supreme Leader is slowly engulfed in fire until his head, obscured by the flames, explodes.

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