media

The most dangerous game

One of my favourite short stories as a teenager was called The Most Dangerous Game

The final few sentences at the end of the book were particularly memorable…

A man, who had been hiding in the curtains of the bed, was standing there.

“Rainsford!” screamed the general. “How in God’s name did you get here?”

“Swam,” said Rainsford. “I found it quicker than walking through the
jungle.”

The general sucked in his breath and smiled. “I congratulate you,” he
said. “You have won the game.”

Rainsford did not smile. “I am still a beast at bay,” he said, in a low,
hoarse voice. “Get ready, General Zaroff.”

The general made one of his deepest bows. “I see,” he said. “Splendid!
One of us is to furnish a repast for the hounds. The other will sleep in
this very excellent bed. On guard, Rainsford.” . . .

He had never slept in a better bed, Rainsford decided.

– Richard Connell (1893-1949)

 

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How long before the UK technique of entrapping politicians makes it here?

After Nicky Hager and his enablers in the mainstream media brought News of The World hacking style tactics to New Zealand media, ti surely can’t be far off from them adopting the UK technique of entrapping politicians.

A Tory MP caught up in an internet sex scandal is to quit the Commons – after a second woman revealed he had sent her explicit personal pictures.

In the latest blow to David Cameron after Thursday’s stunning Ukip by-election victory in Clacton, Brooks Newmark last night said that he will step down at the next Election.

His announcement comes a fortnight after he was revealed to have sent explicit photos of himself to a male reporter posing as a woman.

Not even the Police can act like that.

But the media are a law unto themselves…always claiming public interest in their hacks, traps and stings.  Read more »

Yesterday’s papers

Newspapers continue to decline.

Who wants yesterday’s papers?, the Rolling Stones asked in 1967, and the question is still valid.

It seems the answer is “nobody in the world”.

Clay Shirky writes about the ongoing demise.

Journalists have been infantilized throughout the last decade, kept in a state of relative ignorance about the firms that employ them. A friend tells a story of reporters being asked the paid print circulation of their own publication. Their guesses ranged from 150,000 to 300,000; the actual figure was 35,000. If a reporter was that uninformed about a business he was covering, he’d be taken off the story.

This cluelessness is not by accident; the people who understand the state of the business often hide that knowledge from the workers. My friend Jay Rosen writes about the media’s “production of innocence” — when covering a contentious issue, they must signal to the readers “We have no idea who’s right.” Among the small pool of journalists reporting on their own industry, there is a related task, the production of ignorance. When the press writes about the current dislocations, they must insist that no one knows what will happen. This pattern shows up whenever the media covers itself. When the Tribune Company recently got rid of their newspapers, the New York Timesran the story under a headline “The Tribune Company’s publishing unit is being spun off, as the future of print remains unclear.”

The future of print remains what? Try to imagine a world where the future of print is unclear: Maybe 25 year olds will start demanding news from yesterday, delivered in an unshareable format once a day. Perhaps advertisers will decide “Click to buy” is for wimps. Mobile phones: could be a fad. After all, anything could happen with print. Hard to tell, really.

Meanwhile, back in the treasurer’s office, have a look at this chart. Do you see anything unclear about the trend line?

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Contrary to the contrived ignorance of media reporters, the future of the daily newspaper is one of the few certainties in the current landscape: Most of them are going away, in this decade. (If you work at a paper and you don’t know what’s happened to your own circulation or revenue in the last few years, now might be a good time to ask.) We’re late enough in the process that we can even predict the likely circumstance of its demise.

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I wonder if the Herald is re-thinking their new hire Matt Nippert?

Fairfax published this article…read it and wonder what planet Matt Nippert is on and then realise that they pre-wrote it on an assumption that Hone Harawira was going to win.

Like Martyn Bradbury he was dead wrong.

I hope the NZ Herald enjoys their new hire for the Investigations department, seems he is as adept as David Fisher on taking dictation.

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Franks on engaging social media

Stephen Franks has written a LONG (but very considered) piece on why not only should lawyers not be afraid from engaging with social media, but arguably they are ethically obliged to, where using effective channels to get a message out there is in the interest of a client.
It’s a bit of a read, but for anyone interested in the media, politics and the law, it is an essential read.

A public voice for clients, and for views of what the law should be, does not shun effective platforms.

We have in the past, do now, and will in the future, write, publish, talk about and promote causes and interests in any medium that seems to us likely to be effective. Of course that includes social media. I have my own blog. I comment on the blog posts of others. Frequently the participation is on issues where I or the firm have a view, and our participation is a pro bono attempt to add expert correction or advice to the public discussion. Sometimes participation promotes the firm. Sometimes it is expressly to advance a client’s cause.

Like most people, we are probably more effective and more energetic on issues where our views coincide with those of the client. With their approval we’ll use as many channels as is practicable to ensure that the client position is communicated to the people who should have the information. We are public advocates. We do not eschew any lawful form of communication.

He then turns to the irony of the NBR reporting asking about using a media resource that calls on accountability and causes some offence.     Read more »

Face of the day

 

Rupert Murdoch

Rupert Murdoch

Recent events make this story relevant and raises this question.

If Media using hacked material is a crime in the UK why is it not a crime in NZ?

The only difference is who committed the crime. In both instances the Media benefit from the crime and sell newspapers off of it.

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Is The Press fair and balanced?

From The Press today, letters to the editor.

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Face of the day

Cameron Slater

Cameron Slater

 

So now Cam can add a book (based on e-mails stolen from his computer during a Hacker attack which took down this website for a number of days ) to the two awards on his bookcase.
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He is regularly on radio and often on T.V what can he possibly do next?

Head a new Media organisation perhaps?

The truth comes out, FPA slams Hamas intimidation of journalists

It has long been suspected and revealed by brave journalists once they leave an area, but Hamas has been intimidating journalists.

It has become so bad that the Foreign Press Association has issued a strong condemnation.

The FPA protests in the strongest terms the blatant, incessant, forceful and unorthodox methods employed by the Hamas authorities and their representatives against visiting international journalists in Gaza over the past month.

The international media are not advocacy organisations and cannot be prevented from reporting by means of threats or pressure, thereby denying their readers and viewers an objective picture from the ground.    Read more »

Mediaworks, The Edge staff & competition winners piss off an entire plane of people

Travel at the best of times is frustrating. I have done more than enough of it to choose not to travel unless I absolutely have to.

What with people thinking that traveling with a baby moments after its birth, taking rug rats screaming all the way through airports to sit behind you and kick your seat incessantly, and the interminable waiting, queuing and security checks, travel actually sucks.

It is a brutal necessity to get somewhere nice.

The arm rest stealer…ok I’m one of those, but dare anyone to take it off me. The prick who climbs out of his seat by hauling on your seat back. The weak bladdered sook who sits by the window and has to climb over everyone to get out 5 times on a 3 hour flight…yes travel sucks.

But occasionally you wind up surround by complete cocks.

What’s more they were all be-decked in t-shirts emblazoned with The Edge radio station, wearing id cards of some sort as well. Something about a red card. Some were staff…I know because they were loudly telling everyone they were, where they worked, what they did and what goats their bosses were.

Anyway they were acting like cocks before they got on the plane, running and cavorting down access-ways, one fool, a staff member was even in bare-feet after some other fool broke his jandals…kicking them around the airport like soccer balls.

They were the last to board and I had the misfortune to have 3 of them immediately behind me.

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