media

Franks on engaging social media

Stephen Franks has written a LONG (but very considered) piece on why not only should lawyers not be afraid from engaging with social media, but arguably they are ethically obliged to, where using effective channels to get a message out there is in the interest of a client.
It’s a bit of a read, but for anyone interested in the media, politics and the law, it is an essential read.

A public voice for clients, and for views of what the law should be, does not shun effective platforms.

We have in the past, do now, and will in the future, write, publish, talk about and promote causes and interests in any medium that seems to us likely to be effective. Of course that includes social media. I have my own blog. I comment on the blog posts of others. Frequently the participation is on issues where I or the firm have a view, and our participation is a pro bono attempt to add expert correction or advice to the public discussion. Sometimes participation promotes the firm. Sometimes it is expressly to advance a client’s cause.

Like most people, we are probably more effective and more energetic on issues where our views coincide with those of the client. With their approval we’ll use as many channels as is practicable to ensure that the client position is communicated to the people who should have the information. We are public advocates. We do not eschew any lawful form of communication.

He then turns to the irony of the NBR reporting asking about using a media resource that calls on accountability and causes some offence.     Read more »

Face of the day

 

Rupert Murdoch

Rupert Murdoch

Recent events make this story relevant and raises this question.

If Media using hacked material is a crime in the UK why is it not a crime in NZ?

The only difference is who committed the crime. In both instances the Media benefit from the crime and sell newspapers off of it.

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Is The Press fair and balanced?

From The Press today, letters to the editor.

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Face of the day

Cameron Slater

Cameron Slater

 

So now Cam can add a book (based on e-mails stolen from his computer during a Hacker attack which took down this website for a number of days ) to the two awards on his bookcase.
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He is regularly on radio and often on T.V what can he possibly do next?

Head a new Media organisation perhaps?

The truth comes out, FPA slams Hamas intimidation of journalists

It has long been suspected and revealed by brave journalists once they leave an area, but Hamas has been intimidating journalists.

It has become so bad that the Foreign Press Association has issued a strong condemnation.

The FPA protests in the strongest terms the blatant, incessant, forceful and unorthodox methods employed by the Hamas authorities and their representatives against visiting international journalists in Gaza over the past month.

The international media are not advocacy organisations and cannot be prevented from reporting by means of threats or pressure, thereby denying their readers and viewers an objective picture from the ground.    Read more »

Mediaworks, The Edge staff & competition winners piss off an entire plane of people

Travel at the best of times is frustrating. I have done more than enough of it to choose not to travel unless I absolutely have to.

What with people thinking that traveling with a baby moments after its birth, taking rug rats screaming all the way through airports to sit behind you and kick your seat incessantly, and the interminable waiting, queuing and security checks, travel actually sucks.

It is a brutal necessity to get somewhere nice.

The arm rest stealer…ok I’m one of those, but dare anyone to take it off me. The prick who climbs out of his seat by hauling on your seat back. The weak bladdered sook who sits by the window and has to climb over everyone to get out 5 times on a 3 hour flight…yes travel sucks.

But occasionally you wind up surround by complete cocks.

What’s more they were all be-decked in t-shirts emblazoned with The Edge radio station, wearing id cards of some sort as well. Something about a red card. Some were staff…I know because they were loudly telling everyone they were, where they worked, what they did and what goats their bosses were.

Anyway they were acting like cocks before they got on the plane, running and cavorting down access-ways, one fool, a staff member was even in bare-feet after some other fool broke his jandals…kicking them around the airport like soccer balls.

They were the last to board and I had the misfortune to have 3 of them immediately behind me.

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Russia passes law to make high traffic bloggers part of media

Russia has changed their law to make high traffic bloggers part of the media, forcing them to adopt the same checks and balances other media organisation adhere and are subject to.

Not sure they have got the numbers right, but I guess you have to start somewhere.

The amendments to the law On Information, Information Technology and Information Protection plus other related laws, informally referred to as the law on bloggers, have become effective on August 1, RIA Novosti writes.

The law requires individuals whose blog attracts a daily readership of more than 3,000 to take on the full responsibilities of mass media outlets. President Vladimir Putin signed the bill into law on May 6 this year.

Before the enforcement of the law, the telecommunications authority, Roskomnadzor, published a methodology for calculating the number of subscribers of personal websites and social networking pages. Personal bloggers will be rated by the number of unique visitors and session duration (full loading estimated at no less than 15 seconds).  Read more »

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Dumber than a bag of hammers

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Arse-nasty Lolly Stealer is dumber than a bag of hammers.

Have a look at the mocking she is copping from Felix Marwick who highlights her extreme stupidity.

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NY Supreme Court says websites don’t have to reveal their anonymous contributors in potential libel cases

Another case in the US upholds the rights of bloggers and online media to protect their anonymous sources and contributors.

Joshua Benton at Nieman Journalism Lab writes:

Seeking Alpha is a site for people to write up and share their investing ideas —“a platform for investment research, with broad coverage of stocks, asset classes, ETFs and investment strategy.” Some of its contributors use pseudonyms, and earlier this year, someone using the nom de investissementof “Pump Terminator” wrote a piece arguing that a company named NanoViricides was wildly overvalued and using sketchy business practices.

NanoViricides went to court, demanding that Seeking Alpha turn over the real identity of Pump Terminator so that it could pursue a libel claim against him or her. Seeking Alpha fought it, and now, in what the site is calling a victory for free speech, the New York Supreme Court has denied NanoViricides’ demand. (You can read the court’s opinion here.)

Of interest: The very nature of open crowdsourced platforms — the ruling lumps them together under the rubric of “message boards,” though that seems imprecise in 2014 — makes it harder to pursue the sort of claim NanoViricides was trying to make. Quoting an earlier ruling (emphasis mine):

[i]n determining whether a plaintiff’s complaint [or pre-action petition] includes a published ‘false and defamatory statement concerning another,’ commentators have argued that the defamatory import of the communication must be viewed in light of the fact that bulletin boards and chat rooms ‘are often the repository of a wide range of casual, emotive, and imprecise speech,’ and that the online ‘recipients of [offensive] statements do not necessarily attribute the same level of credence to the statements [that] they would accord to statements made in other contexts.’ 

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Media trust? Not any time soon

Where America goes we do follow.

Gallup has released research that shows Americans no longer trust their news media.

This is what happens when media cease telling the news and start mounting campaigns, mostly for left wing causes.

Americans’ faith in each of three major news media platforms — television news, newspapers, and news on the Internet — is at or tied with record lows in Gallup’s long-standing confidence in institutions trend. This continues a decades-long decline in the share of Americans saying they have “a great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in newspapers or TV news, while trust in Internet news remains low since the one prior measure in 1999.

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These results are from a Gallup poll conducted June 5-8.The three major sources of news ranked in the bottom third of 17 different U.S. institutions measured in the poll.

Confidence in newspapers has declined by more than half since its 1979 peak of 51%, while TV news has seen confidence ebb from its high of 46% in 1993, the first year that Gallup asked this question. Gallup’s only previous measure of Internet news was in 1999, when confidence was 21%, little different from today.

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