Mexico

How bad is a 0.42% death rate among stock?

Did you know that on cruise ships, the average death rates of human beings hovers around the 2.5% mark?   Keep that in mind.

Animal advocacy organisation SAFE is appalled that 191 sheep and one cow perished on board a controversial live export shipment to Mexico. The shipment of a reported 45,000 sheep and 3,200 cattle was the largest cargo of animals ever to leave New Zealand.

“192 animals have died and it begs the question, how many more will die on the next stage of their journey?” says SAFE’s executive director, Hans Kriek.

The sheep are being transported by truck for 1000 kilometres in 30-degree temperatures to a farm near Mexico City from where they will be distributed to smaller farms. It was reported that some sheep also died at the feedlots as they waited to board.

There are no reports yet on why the animals died, but it is known that on live export ships a number of animals die from illness or starvation. Some suffer from ‘inanition’ – not recognising the ship food of pellets as food as they were previously used to being on pasture.

Of course, the Ministery of Primary Industries have a totally different view   Read more »

Another dodgy sheep deal?

Last week 50,000 sheep were sent to Mexico of all places..apparently by the same bloke who shipped sheep to Saudi Arabia.

Who knew that Mexico needed to establish a breeding programme?

It seems there are some questions about all this though.

An agricultural professor says the government must try and find out what actually happens to the thousands of sheep being sent to Mexico, once they arrive.

The 50,000 sheep and 3000 cattle are being sent to Mexico for breeding and left Timaru on board the livestock carrier Nada, over a week ago.

New Zealand bans live sheep exports for slaughter, but not for breeding purposes.

An agri-food systems professor at Lincoln University, Keith Woodford, said in his experience the animals would quickly be killed and end up on the barbecue at village festivals.

He said the Government needed to send New Zealand veterinarians to work with the Mexican authorities and find out what was really happening to the sheep.    Read more »

If they’re not staring at goats they are staring at sheep

Labour are spastic, Andrew Little especially.

He is going in to bat, now, for 50,000 non-voting sheep.

I kid you not.

Labour wants assurances that tens of thousands of sheep and cattle being shipped to Mexico won’t be killed when they get there.

The shipment leaves Timaru today.

Leader Andrew Little told Newstalk ZB’s Rachel Smalley the regulations are clear – you can export live sheep for breeding purposes, you can’t for slaughter.

He admits 50,000 seems like a big number for breeding stock.

“We really need to know and be assured very firmly that these sheep are not going to wind up in a slaughter house somewhere in Mexico that they genuinely are for breeding stock.”    Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: Michael Terlep

Photo: Michael Terlep

Marshall Islands Castaway

Jose Alvarenga Sued for $1 Million

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Photo Of The Day

Photo of the Dolls' Island on Isla de las Munecas in Mexico.

Photo of the Dolls’ Island on Isla de las Munecas in Mexico.

Not for Tourists: Island of the Dolls

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Photo Of The Day

Photo:  Carsten Peter Discovered in 2000 by two brothers who were drilling below the Naica Mine near Chihuahua, Mexico, the Cave of Crystals is a glittering spectacle with temperatures that can reach up to 112 degrees. Many of the crystals, which are estimated to be about 600,000 years old, can be several feet thick, and the smaller ones are razor sharp. Forget diamonds; if you really love a woman, take her to a cave filled with crystals bigger than her wildest dreams.

Photo: Carsten Peter
Discovered in 2000 by two brothers who were drilling below the Naica Mine near Chihuahua, Mexico, the Cave of Crystals is a glittering spectacle with temperatures that can reach up to 112 degrees. Many of the crystals, which are estimated to be about 600,000 years old, can be several feet thick, and the smaller ones are razor sharp. Forget diamonds; if you really love a woman, take her to a cave filled with crystals bigger than her wildest dreams.

Cueva de los Cristales (Mexico)

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Photo Of The Day

PHOTOGRAPH BY KATIE ORLINSKY MEXICO’S CITIZEN POLICE, XALTIANGUIS, GUERERRO, MEXICO A Commander of the Xaltianguis Citizen Police teaches new recruits how to use rifles and revolvers. “The message is that we wake up to the fact that we have to participate, and the guns are to say don’t attack us,” says the town’s Citizen Police chief Miguel Jimenez. “We aren’t inviting women to take up arms; we are inviting them to take back their honour.”

PHOTOGRAPH BY KATIE ORLINSKY
MEXICO’S CITIZEN POLICE, XALTIANGUIS, GUERERRO, MEXICO
A Commander of the Xaltianguis Citizen Police teaches new recruits how to use rifles and revolvers. “The message is that we wake up to the fact that we have to participate, and the guns are to say don’t attack us,” says the town’s Citizen Police chief Miguel Jimenez. “We aren’t inviting women to take up arms; we are inviting them to take back their honour.”

Mexico’s Citizen Police

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Jason deCaires Taylor The Silent Evolution. MUSA Collection, 2010. Depth, 8 m. Manchones Reef, Mexico.

Photo: Jason deCaires Taylor
The Silent Evolution. MUSA Collection, 2010. Depth, 8 m. Manchones Reef, Mexico.

The Silent Evolution

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Bénédicte Desrus María Isabel in her bedroom at Casa Xochiquetzal, 2013. The former sex worker, who grew up in Michoacán, Mexico, ran away from home at the age of 9 after a year in which her father “used her.” When she got to the Mexico City bus station, she met a woman selling tamales who offered her a home and education. María Isabel nearly finished her studies to become a teacher, but when her caretaker died, she became a sex worker at 17. She now reads, writes poetry, embroiders, and makes earrings and bracelets.

Photo: Bénédicte Desrus
María Isabel in her bedroom at Casa Xochiquetzal, 2013. The former sex worker, who grew up in Michoacán, Mexico, ran away from home at the age of 9 after a year in which her father “used her.” When she got to the Mexico City bus station, she met a woman selling tamales who offered her a home and education. María Isabel nearly finished her studies to become a teacher, but when her caretaker died, she became a sex worker at 17. She now reads, writes poetry, embroiders, and makes earrings and bracelets.

The Lives of Retired Sex Workers in Mexico City

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How long before the wowsers lobby for this here?

coke-mexico

After surpassing the U.S. as the most obese country in the world in 2013, Mexico is taking action against ads for high-calorie food and soft drinks.

Ads featuring those items will be banned on TV between 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. on weekdays, and between 7:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. on weekends. The ads will also be restricted in movie theaters. Mexicans, who have the highest rate of diabetes in the world, are also the world’s largest consumers of sugary drinks, with an average of 163 litres per person a year. 

It is only a matter of time before the health nazis start pushing for similar bans here…Duncan Garner will push this hard out for sure, as will water salesman Tony Falkenstein.

Meanwhile Coke and Frucor and other soda manufacturers should prepare themselves for a hammering that their blond, ditzy, PR maven won’t know what to cope with.

Mexico is restricting television advertising for high-calorie food and soft drinks, as part of its campaign against obesity, the government says.

Such ads will be banned with immediate effect on terrestrial and cable TV between 14:30 and 19:30 on weekdays and between 07:30 and 19:30 at weekends.

Restrictions will also be imposed on similar ads shown at the cinema.

Seventy percent of adults and 30% of children in Mexico are obese or overweight, official figures suggest.

Overall, 40% of commercials for soft drinks, confectionery and chocolates will disappear from TV, in favour of products which “meet nutritional standards”, the health ministry is quoted as saying.

Mexico is going further than any other country in restricting advertising.

The UK, Norway and Quebec province in Canada, all have bans on advertising junk food in children’s television.

However, this has not stopped the adverts appearing in more popular “family” programming.   Read more »

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