National Party

Question seven: If ACT, NZ First or National made strong changes to immigration policy that you liked, would that be enough to retain or gain your vote next election?

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My motivation for creating a survey on immigration was to get an accurate snapshot of what a  Conservative/ Libertarian voter  thinks about immigration in New Zealand. I wanted this snap shot  primarily for David Seymour  as he commented that the small changes Act had proposed for immigration did not gain any support from this blog and resulted in a lot of negativity from the media.

Winston Peters of course has always been vocal about immigration, I hope this survey gives him some insight on what our real concerns about immigration are. Are we anti-immigration? Or do we think immigration is a good thing?

John Key likes to implement policies that will be popular with voters so he too should find this survey useful.I think he will be surprised at what it shows.

Due to our large audience we easily surveyed over one thousand voters in less than a day. This survey is not of the general population but of a specific conservative/libertarian audience. I gave two yes options and two no options for every  question.

Here are the results for question seven: If the Act Party, NZ First or the National Party made strong changes to immigration that you liked would that be a policy popular enough to retain or gain your vote next election?

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How do our political parties’ immigration policies compare?

Immigration policies from all conservative political parties are listed below with links to their policy details at the end. I have also included non-conservative parties so that you can compare.

To help with this process I have summarised their policies. It is interesting to me that the Green party have much harsher guidelines and rules for migrants who bring money to New Zealand than they do for migrants who bring nothing but themselves. ACT on the other hand want to encourage migrant investors as do National. Surprisingly though, National have no policy details regarding NZ values/culture, citizenship, residency or NZ laws with regard to migrants.

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What is happening to Andrew Bolt is the exact reason why we need ACT to act

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I am thrilled that David Seymour  is prepared to discuss immigration with the Whaleoil community. He mentioned that when he has attempted minor changes to immigration he has been attacked by the media and not supported  by us. What is currently happening to courageous Andrew Bolt in Australia is exactly the reason why I want the ACT party to act more strongly on immigration. The reality is that anyone who points out the serious problems within Islamic culture will be attacked, not only by the media but by people within the Muslim community. This cannot be a reason for the National party and the ACT party to do nothing. Instead, it has to be the reason why they make strong immigration policy a priority.

It is clear that when we criticise Islam we risk death. We need politicians like Geert Wilders who are prepared to put their country’s safety first. Like Andrew Bolt, we here at Whaleoil have put ourselves at risk by criticising Islam. I expect the political party I support to be prepared to do the same. Nothing worth having is ever easy. I will support and promote in my personal posts on Whaleoil any political party with strong immigration policies regarding Islam. Copying the Swiss policy regarding citizenship and assimilation would be a good start.

Andrew Bolt says he has moved children out of family home after death threats

Bolt says threats came from Islamic State supporter and follows his newspaper column for Herald Sun which suggested if ‘we criticise Islam … we risk death’

Andrew Bolt says his children have had to be moved out of the family home after receiving death threats from a supporter of Islamic State.

The News Corp columnist made the revelation on Thursday night during an interview with Pauline Hanson on his Sky News Australia program, The Bolt Report.

“I just spent some of my day moving my kids out of my home after yet another death threat from an Islamist supporter of Islamic State,” a visibly upset Bolt told Hanson.

“Two of my colleagues have had to move house completely because of these guys.”

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Winston the elephant

There was a rather large elephant in the room through the weekend at the National Party conference.

Though the party had, in the words of one senior Beehive adviser “stage managed the shit out of the conference” talking to MPs and delegates revealed a party that has one major issue on its mind.

And the issue is the Rt Hon Winston Peters.

National strategists have believed for a while that NZ First was making up ground but that it was winning that ground off Labour.

However, the election results in Australia, Brexit and the rise of Donald Trump all point to this being a time when established parties need to take populist insurgents seriously.

It’s not just a question of whether National will need New Zealand First and Peters to form a Government, but would he even consider it as long as John Key leads them, and if he did, would their agreement to have him join to end the same way his previous engagement with National did under Jenny Shipley in 1998.

Their preference is to have the current Government and its support parties be re-elected with much the same numbers it has now.

And that’s the official line; that’s what the goal is.

The elephant in the room is that National are slowly drifting ever more to the left, allowing Winston more play in the middle. Readers have noted that Winston is ‘starting to make sense’ to them.  Read more »

Oh really John?

John Key had this to say over the weekend at the National party conference.

“The voters of New Zealand don’t concentrate so much on which term of Government you are in but about the results you can achieve for New Zealanders, the focus of attention you really have on the issues that really matter – the economy, law and order, health and education – what you are going to do for the voters and what your vision is for New Zealand.”

The Government had to earn the right to govern every day.

It was judged on on every decision it made, good or bad.

“We get judged on the way we handle the decisions, not on the complexity of them, certainly not by whingeing about how difficult they might be but by actually coming up with solutions then delivering on them.”

He said National had delivered stable and predictable Government and it had to remain committed to the task.

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Yet another politician who fails to understand the meaning of democracy

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I received the below email from Sue Moroney, a Labour MP who seems to be confused about what democracy actually is. Like the Remoaners from the Remain campaign in Britain, when things don’t go her way she blames it on a lack of democracy.

The government voted for by the people, the government with the majority, is the government that has the power to make decisions. That power was given to them by the people. It is a power that can be taken away easily. It is the whole point of democracy. We can elect people into power and we can remove them from power. MPs who are not part of the government do not have power because we didn’t give them any. If the National government chooses to not go ahead with something Sue Moroney wants, then that is democracy in action.

Unlike the Labour party the National party have the responsibility of managing New Zealand’s finances. They cannot open New Zealand’s purse and spend freely every time Sue Moroney demands it. I liken it to the manager of a business and an employee of a business. The employee wants a coffee machine for the staff cafeteria because it will make the staff happier and more productive, in his opinion. The manager would like to do this for her staff but she looks at the business budget and sees that she cannot provide the coffee machine without cutting important spending elsewhere. Management have the “financial veto power” for a reason. The buck stops with them, not with the employees. It is the same with Sue Moroney’s Paid Parental Leave Bill. It is a lovely, generous idea but her party isn’t the one that has to find the money to fund it.

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My apology to Paul Foster-Bell

Earlier today I accused troughing scum List MP Paul Foster-Bell of not achieving anything…I was wrong…well sort of.

He has been trying to rename State Highway One the “Captain Cook Highway”…unsuccessfully.

Under-fire National MP Paul Foster-Bell has been campaigning for State Highway 1 to be renamed the Captain Cook Highway.

Newshub has learned Mr Foster-Bell has been lobbying for the name change on behalf of Sir Christopher Harris — a wealthy National Party stalwart who is also a Captain Cook enthusiast.

A source who used to work in Mr Foster-Bell’s office said: “Paul’s massive groundbreaking idea for a member’s Bill was renaming SH1 the Captain Cook Highway.”

The source said Mr Foster-Bell was “trying to impress Sir Christopher”, who donates to the National Party.   Read more »

Key defends Foster-Bell as a hard worker. Really? List his achievements

John Key is defending Paul Foster-Bell. Stuff knows why. He’s done nothing.

Prime Minister John Key has defended the high travel bill for one of his backbench MPs.

Paul Foster-Bell has also faced accusations of poor management after reportedly having 12 staff leave over a period of three years.

The former diplomat and list MP racked up a $61,090 travel and accommodation bill last year – the third-highest for Wellington-based MPs.

Asked about those expenses today, Mr Key said Mr Foster-Bell was among a group of MPs that tended to travel more, as that was required by the party.

“It’s not unusual for us to use a list MP, certainly someone with skills like he has in foreign affairs, around the country. Other MPs ask him to support them in terms of talks or seminars … or to fill in, for instance, for ministers.”

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Hide mocks National for just one more little tax

The Government now wants to charge us to drive during peak times. Our fault, apparently.

We are not spreading our road use through the day and the new charge is designed to make us do that.

Minister of Transport Simon Bridges says building more roads won’t solve the problem. That’s because we would just fill them up.

It’s hard, though – they are such a good way to get about.

The new rationing policy is called Variable Network Pricing (VNP). Its purpose is to price some of us off the road. Those who use the roads must pay for each kilometre driven.

Those priced off will have to stay at home, drive off-peak or use some other form of transport.

The VNP will need to be high to make it work. Read more »

The Hobbit of Hobbiton annouces retirement

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The Hobbit of Hobbiton, Lindsay Tisch, has announced his retirement.

Long-serving Waikato MP Lindsay Tisch will leave Parliament after next year’s election.

Mr Tisch, a former National Party president and who became an MP in 1999, has announced he will not seek the National Party nomination for his Waikato electorate next year.

Waikato is a safe National seat, with Mr Tishch having one of the largest majorities in the country when he won the seat by 16,169 votes in 2014.

“I feel very privileged to have served and represented the constituents of the Waikato and to promote the region as a great place to live, work, and raise a family. It has given me great satisfaction and a sense of achievement,” Mr Tisch said.

“I am particularly pleased that the policies I advocated for in Opposition have come to fruition,” Mr Tisch said.

“I promoted simplification of provisional tax to help small businesses. As tourism spokesperson I also promoted a convention centre for Auckland.

I am delighted to now see these progressed.”

Mr Tisch said he was also proud to be the local MP when the Waikato Expressway was constructed, which had improved the local economy and road safety.

In 2008 Mr Tisch was appointed as a Presiding Officer of Parliament.

“I have been particularly pleased to have been able to operate within the sphere of the institution of Parliament, and to have had input into Speakers Rulings and Standing Orders,” Mr Tisch said.

He finally took the hints from the 9th floor.

Lindsay Tisch was one of the few who went from being party president to an MP. This is not a normal route to parliament for National MPs but, to be fair, Lindsay was only a temporary president after John Collinge was eased out the door.

Tisch benefited early on in his career from having Sue Moroney stand against him in 2002 and 2005, and then Jacinda Ardern in 2008. The Moroney Effect meant he increased his majority substantially.

John Key will now enjoy some renewal of his caucus, and this will accelerate when some other long-serving MPs announce their retirements soon. Labour will be heading into the election with tired old faces from the Clark era in key positions.

 

– NZ Herald