New Zealand

Eleven year old New Zealander Florence’s winning speech

Legalisation of Marijuana for RECREATIONAL use: Whaleoil survey results

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It was close but the majority of our readership do not want marijuana to be legalised for recreational use.

Those against legalisation expressed concerns about associated health issues or social costs such as people driving under the influence and teenagers getting easier access to it. Some wanted it decriminalised but did not want to go as far as legalisation. One person believed that by legalising marijuana the government would be normalising it.

Those for legalisation said that it would save on  enforcement costs and could be regulated and taxed just like tobacco. Many felt that it is up to individuals to manage their own behaviour. Age restrictions were suggested. The lowest age suggested was 18 and the highest was 25+.One person suggested alcohol-type controls on purchasing and a good legal test to manage driving under the influence. An obviously libertarian writer commented that as long as they’re not harming anyone else, what people do is their own business.

 

 

 

Legalisation of Marijuana for MEDICAL use: Whaleoil survey results

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An overwhelming majority of Whaleoil readers support legalisation of medical marijuana.

The  main concern expressed was  whether or not it would be controlled properly so that there would be no backdoor access for people who want to use it recreationally.

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Why I don’t want these British immigrants to come to New Zealand

Immigrants who leave Europe because of the mass Muslim migration and the damage it has done to their home countries  are the kind of immigrants that I would be happy to welcome to New Zealand. Assuming that they have skills useful to New Zealand, they also will bring with them wisdom.  They have learned the hard way what underdog socialism does to countries.

In contrast, immigrants from the UK fleeing Brexit  are not the kind of immigrants that I would welcome to New Zealand. They bring with them the belief system of underdog socialism. They will do to New Zealand what they have already done to Europe. They turned it into a dangerous land of opportunity for terrorists. They welcomed in their millions a culture that is steadily challenging and destroying their own moral and cultural values because of their slavish devotion to multiculturalism and tolerance.

Now that they have done the damage to their country they want to leave it because it is belatedly trying to to protect itself. I do not want these kinds of idiots in our society. They can take their open borders and their lack of patriotism and pride in their National culture and they can shove it where the sun don’t shine. Their belief system is more poisonous and dangerous to New Zealand than any Islamic terrorist.

In 49 days after the vote, there were 10,647 registrations from the UK compared with 4599 over the same period last year.
More than 10,500 registrations from people considering moving here from Britain have been lodged with Immigration New Zealand since the Brexit vote.

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Rodney Hide hits Teacher Unions hard

Over at the NBR Rodney Hide is hitting the teacher unions hard. He is not playing nicely as the gloves are clearly off. It is great to see that the same fantastic results I wrote about here are now appearing in the mainstream media. Alwyn Poole and his loyal staff at South Auckland Middle School deserve all the praise Rodney has given and more.

The teacher unions oppose the charter schools with every fibre of their being.  Their opposition is well-founded: The charter schools highlight the failure of the unions.

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Battle of Long Tan Day – 50th Anniversary

On this day in 1966, 50 years ago:

The Battle of Long Tan was fought between the Australian Army and Viet Cong forces in a rubber plantation near the village of Long Tần, about 27 kilometres (17 mi) north east of Vung Tau, South Vietnam. The action occurred when D Company of the 6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (6RAR), part of the 1st Australian Task Force (1 ATF), encountered the Viet Cong (VC) 275 Regiment and elements of the D445 Local Forces Battalion. D Company was supported by other Australian units, as well as New Zealand and United States artillery.

skippy1During the battle the company from 6RAR, despite being heavily outnumbered, fought off a large enemy assault of regimental strength. 18 Australians were killed and 24 wounded, while at least 245 Viet Cong were killed. It was a decisive Australian victory and is often cited as an example of the importance of combining and coordinating infantry, artillery, armour and military aviation. The battle had considerable tactical implications as well, being significant in allowing the Australians to gain dominance over Phước Tuy province, and although there were a number of other large-scale encounters in later years, 1ATF was not fundamentally challenged again.

The battle has since achieved similar symbolic significance for the Australian military in the Vietnam War as battles such as the Gallipoli Campaign have for the First World War, the Kokoda Track Campaign for the Second World War and the Battle of Kapyong for the Korean War.

One of those men who fought in the Battle of Long Tan that day was my father in law. He was firstly in the field as an Op and then brought back to man the guns that day as they fought to save the Aussie soldiers.

The Kiwi guns were instru­men­tal in sav­ing 3 pla­toons of D Com­pany of the  6thBat­tal­ion, Royal Aus­tralian Reg­i­ment (6RAR) and enabling the thrash­ing of a Reg­i­ment of Viet Cong.

Each gun fired over 1200 rounds that day and night in sup­port of the Aussies. The bat­tle was fought in a rub­ber tree plan­ta­tion near the vil­lage of Long Tan, about 40 km north-east of Vung Tau, South Viet­nam on August 18–19, 1966. The bat­tle was fought all after­noon and most of the night in pour­ing mon­soon rain. The guns ran so hot that wet blan­kets were draped over them in an attempt to keep the bar­rels cool.

MorrieStanelyS1966In 2010 another veteran of this battle, Major Morrie Stanley, sadly passed away. Our news media at the time barely covered it but the Aussie media did. They know what these guys did to save their boys and they well remember it.

Today is the day I remember their service.

Above is the online documentary about the Battle of Long Tan . It is superb and well worth spending the time watching.

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The Long Tan Cross

Lest we forget.

New Zealand must not imitate Canada’s assimilation methods

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Obama as a Borg and Resistance Is Futile

It is very important that immigrants assimilate into their new country’s culture. The Borg from the T.V show Star Trek, are seen as evil because they assimilate by force and because assimilation is total. There is no remnant of the original culture left by the time they have finished and they can no longer think for themselves as they have a hive mind. Their catch cry is ” Resistance is futile, you will be assimilated.”  

In Canada, Trudeau’s Liberals are hard at work ensuring that assimilation occurs. They  have been very successful in their attempts to ensure assimilation between Syrian refugee children and Canadian children. The problem is that the children were given no choice in the matter. They were forced to follow the new culture’s laws. Their families are not happy about it as the new culture’s laws are very different to those of their own country.

As you have been reading this you will have assumed that the families I am talking about are the families of the Syrian refugee children. If you assumed that you are wrong.  The children that have been forced to assimilate into the  laws of the new culture are in fact the Canadian children.

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A smart Political Party would keep New Zealand safe

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Why are we so safe?

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Why I support e-cigarettes and vaping

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The good news is that it looks like the National government is moving to legalise e-cigarette’s. This move is way overdue. Vaping is a much safer alternative to traditional cigarette smoking. When you vape you do not inhale all the carcinogenic chemicals that are soaked into cigarette paper and added to tobacco.

The bad news is that the Ministry of health’s proposal is to tax them in the same way we tax tobacco.

To me the main benefit of legalising e-cigarettes is to provide a strong financial incentive for smokers to switch to vaping which is a lot less harmful. An added benefit of e-cigarettes is that you can tightly control the amount of nicotine that you inhale. This means that if you want to quit, you can do it gradually without having to use patches or nicotine gum. You can also keep your habit without the nicotine as it is possible to inhale flavoured vapour that tastes like tobacco or any other flavour you desire.

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Question five: Is immigration good for New Zealand?

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My motivation for creating a survey on immigration was to get an accurate snapshot of what a  Conservative/ Libertarian voter  thinks about immigration in New Zealand. I wanted this snap shot  primarily for David Seymour  as he commented that the small changes Act had proposed for immigration did not gain any support from this blog and resulted in a lot of negativity from the media.

Winston Peters of course has always been vocal about immigration, I hope this survey gives him some insight on what our real concerns about immigration are. Are we anti-immigration? Or do we think immigration is a good thing?

John Key likes to implement policies that will be popular with voters so he too should find this survey useful.I think he will be surprised at what it shows.

Due to our large audience we easily surveyed over one thousand voters in less than a day. This survey is not of the general population but of a specific conservative/libertarian audience. I gave two yes options and two no options for every  question.

Here are the results for question five: Is immigration good for New Zealand?

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