New Zealand

My how the Media worm has turned

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My, how the Media worm has turned. The whole time this website was trying to get the message out to the public about Kim Dotcom the media consistently described him in the following ways…

The New Zealand Herald described him like this:

Tycoon could be kicked out of country for failing to disclose conviction.

…troubled internet millionaire Kim Dotcom has found himself kicked off the cloud storage site he founded.

Internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom will face tougher new bail conditions and make a daily visit to the police for at least the next week.

But the Megaupload founder’s US lawyer, Ira Rothken, has tweeted that both Davison and Simpson Grierson are stepping down from Dotcom’s legal team.

Internet millionaire Kim Dotcom has lost his appeal

Claims by internet mogul Kim Dotcom of a conspiracy between the United States and New Zealand Governments do not have “an air of reality”, a High Court judge has ruled.

One News described him like this:

The internet entrepreneur is in a High Court battle over an attempt to extradite him to the US to face piracy charges.

Internet entrepreneur and Internet Party founder Kim Dotcom was joined by US journalist Glenn Greenwald at the Auckland Town Hall for the ‘Moment of Truth’ which Dotcom predicted would be a “bombshell” just days ahead of Saturday’s General Election.

T.V 3 described him like this:

Immigration NZ (INZ) says it will consider if there is any “liability” to deport internet millionaire Kim Dotcom, after it was revealed he failed to declare a conviction for dangerous driving when he applied for New Zealand residency.

Now however he is being described like this…

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Slavery in New Zealand, yes really.

Slave ship

Slave ship

New Zealand has a low level of modern slavery but people are still being exploited and changes need to be made, a global survey has found.

“Modern slavery for us is any situation where one person deliberately takes away another person’s liberty for some sort of profit or gain,” Walk Free Foundation global research executive director Fiona David says.

Modern slavery traps 35.8million people

This includes human trafficking, forced labour, forced or servile marriage, and the sale and exploitation of children.

New Zealand is estimated to have 600 people in modern slavery, the fourth lowest prevalence of 167 countries in the Global Slavery Index.

The known cases involved workers in modern slavery with the most widely documented being on fishing charter vessels in New Zealand waters, Ms David told NZ Newswire.

Their situations have included being subjected to violence, sexual abuse, being fed stale bread and fish bait, working 30-hour shifts and even being paid 35 cents an hour.”

New laws clamping down on fishing boat conditions come into force in 2016, which was “really positive”, she said.

-NZ Newswire

 

So who in New Zealand are responsible for modern slavery? I did a bit of digging and came up with this…

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Netflix is coming to NZ…well it is already here, just not officially

Netflix has announced that they will be coming officially to New Zealand in March next year.

Lightbox, the internet-based television service launched by Spark this year, has welcomed the competition from United States online streaming giant Netflix, which aims to start up in New Zealand in March.

Lightbox says it is “confident” it has enough to offer that Netflix will not have.

Netflix, an online TV and movie website with 53 million customers worldwide, will directly compete with both Sky TV and Lightbox.

“We’re confident in our product,” said Lightbox chief executive Kym Niblock.

Asked how Lightbox planned to stand up against Netflix’s content library, Ms Niblock said she was “very confident” Lightbox would be offering “things that Netflix won’t have”.

“Lightbox has paid for a number of exclusives.”

The local service also offered New Zealand content.

While indicating she was pleased with Lightbox’s growth, Ms Niblock would not reveal any customer numbers.

Netflix said on its website yesterday that it would launch in Australia and New Zealand next March. It said its service would be available on smart televisions, tablets, smartphones, computers, consoles and set-top boxes.

There are no details yet on pricing, but US customers are charged about US$10 ($12.70) a month. Lightbox charges $15 a month while Sky TV’s online television service Neon will cost $20 a month when it launches next month.

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Tears of impotent rage over union backed win of Andrew Little

There are plenty on the left who are crying tears of impotent rage at the union backed win of Andrew Little.

None more so that poor wee Andrew Geddis, the man who can’t bear to speak my name.

Labour just made the wrong choice, in the worst possible way.

Obviously, I think that the decision to choose Andrew Little over Grant Robertson was the wrong one however it came about … that’s because Grant is a good friend whom I think will one day make a fantastic Prime Minister of New Zealand. So Andrew Little could be the reincarnation of Jack Kennedy mixed with Bob Hawke by way of Michael Joseph Savage (which he most certainly isn’t) and I’d still be lamenting the Labour Party’s decision to appoint him leader ahead of Grant.

So let’s put aside my personal disappointment at the actual decision that Labour has made and instead look at how it has done so. Because it looks to me like it’s created an almighty cluster&*k.

Nah let’s not…Andrew should cry some more his tears are delicious.

First, Little beat Grant by just over 1% of the weighted votes cast. That’s about as close a margin of victory as you can get, achieved on the third round. So the overall mandate for Little’s leadership is … fragile, at best.

Second, Little lost heavily to Grant in both the Caucus and the Membership vote in every successive round of voting. Little was the first choice to be leader of only four of his colleagues (assuming he voted for himself, that is). Only 14 of 32 backed him as leader over Grant by their third choice – meaning 18 of 32 think Grant is a better person to lead them. And in respect of the membership vote, Little was consistently 10% behind Grant at each stage of the vote.

The thing that gave Little the edge, of course, was his support amongst “affiliates” – which means those unions that still retain membership ties with Labour.    Read more »

Send the best John

SAS-Baddass

John Key is suggesting that we could deploy the NZSAS to Iraq in order to protect other troops deployed to Iraq…think about that for a moment.

New Zealand’s elite Special Air Service (SAS) could be deployed to Iraq to protect Kiwi troops sent to train local forces.

Prime Minister John Key confirmed that was one option under consideration as the government continues to weigh up its response to the rise of Islamic State (IS) n Iraq and Syria.

Key announced earlier this month a raft of measures including foreign fighter legislation to crack down on Kiwis wanting to sign up to the IS cause.

He also announced plans to send a contingent of New Zealand soldiers to Iraq to train local forces but ruled out a combat role and said they would be largely confined to the classroom and “behind the perimeter” fence.

Speaking to Fairfax on his way to the G20 summit in Brisbane at the weekend, Key said the Government was still weighing up the shape of its contribution, and said he could not rule out deploying the SAS.

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Did Key never exploit weakness when he was at Merrill Lynch?

John Key has said that government officials have been telling privately owned companies that they shouldn’t exploit market gaps as a result of sanctions against Russia, because it would apparently be a bad look for NZ.

Mr Key also revealed that although New Zealand has not officially imposed trade sanctions on Russia, government officials had called in Fonterra and other companies to ask them not to exploit the gap left in the Russian market. Mr Key said it was made clear that would be a terrible look for New Zealand – and while the Government could not stop them doing so, he believed they were acting responsibly.

Fonterra general manager of trade strategy Robb Stevens yesterday confirmed the Government “has asked agricultural exporters, including Fonterra, to show restraint and not take advantage of the restrictions imposed on other nations”.

How pathetic.  Read more »

Face of the day

 

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Yardizi child stuck on a mountain top

GUEST POST:

Stuck on a mountain for months this is a Yardizi child whose immediate future is to witness her family being slaughtered and then she will be a bride for an Islamic state fighter who wants a Muslim caliphate and we do what ?

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Free trade deal done with South Korea

While the left wing were marching in the streets opposing the TPPA another free trade deal has snuck under their radar.

New Zealand has completed a free trade deal with South Korea.

New Zealand and South Korea have concluded a free-trade agreement that’s expected to cut $230 million of export tariffs in New Zealand’s sixth-largest export market, including $65 million in the first year.

The deal, which was announced on the sidelines of the G20 Leaders’ Summit in Brisbane, will initially eliminate tariffs on 48 percent of current New Zealand exports, with duties largely eliminated within 15 years. Two-way trade between the countries is worth about $4 billion.

South Korea has said it also aims to conclude FTAs with China and Vietnam before the end of the year, after agreeing recent deals with Australia and Canada. New Zealand is actively seeking such agreements after trade with China soared since an FTA was inked in 2008. The Korean FTA marks Prime Minister John Key’s first bilateral deal since being elected leader.

The Korean talks, begun in 2009, have previously stalled amid Korean concern about the impact of New Zealand agricultural exports on domestic producers.

“It has been a long, hard agreement to reach,” Key told reporters in Brisbane. “It’s a high quality deal. It was always going to be a tough negotiation but we have got ourselves now back into a level playing field with those countries that compete heavily in the Korean market and I think a lot of New Zealand industry will be happy about the outcome.”

Tariffs slated for elimination include a 45 percent rate on kiwifruit, 22.5 percent charged on sheep meat, a 40 percent levy on beef and an 89 percent tariff on butter.

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Concrete Cancer Coverup, Ctd

by Stephen Cook

THE COMPANY accused of using suspect cement imported cheaply from overseas in its precast concrete products has gone into damage control mode as the spotlight shifts to its role in the whole controversy

With nine years in the business, Concretech New Zealand Ltd claim to be one of this country’s leading pre-cast concrete suppliers with “strict quality control systems… to meet any challenge, no matter how architecturally demanding.”

However, rhetoric is one thing – reality can be quite another.

The focus is now on Concretec’s role in the whole scandal after claims from industry insiders the company may have unwittingly used suspect cement from Vietnam in pre-cast concrete products it later supplied to several major construction companies.

That cement, which had higher than usual alkali levels, was imported by Drymix who control about five percent of the $400 million-a-year cement market and through Mitre 10 supply the domestic market with the highly-popular ‘Super Easy Mix In The Bag’ range of cement products.

In January, February and March this year Drymix imported tens of thousands of tonnes of cement, which according to their own test samples, failed to meet recognised industry standards.

Drymix supply cement to a company called Techcrete, who make readymix concrete which they supply to Concretec who supply precast concrete products to companies like Watts & Hughes and Ebert Construction,.

Both these companies are also facing questions after concerns that suspect cement may have been used in the $40 million Manukau District Court upgrade and Yashili’s $250 million plant at Pokeno.

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Cut the corporate welfare and lower taxes before Australia

The IRD is warning the government will have to cut corporate taxes if Australia lowers theirs.

What a good idea.

Inland Revenue has warned the Government may have to consider cutting the company tax rate next year if Australia drops its rate.

In a briefing to Revenue Minister Todd McClay, the tax department said New Zealand’s aging population could result in pressure to raise taxes to pay for health and pensions.

But it said the Government would need to take into account developments in other countries when considering company tax, which was cut from 30 per cent to 28 per cent in 2011, undercutting Australia’s 30 per cent rate.

“Tax changes in Australia should continue to be monitored as they can have important implications for New Zealand,” Inland Revenue said. “A particular focus will be Australia’s White Paper due out at the end of 2015.

“If, for example, there were a substantial reduction in the Australian company tax rate, the question of whether New Zealand should follow suit would arise,” it said.

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