NZ Herald

If you only read ONE thing today…

fmg-web-2The following was first published in the April edition of INCITE Politics.

During the 2011 election, my wife Rachel and I had been invited by TVNZ to cover the leaders’ debates for our television website Throng. While the purpose of us being there was to provide a look at what happens out of view of the camera, the final debate resulted in Rachel being central to a NZ Herald story.

During one ad break, John Key struck up a conversation with Rachel about being in his electorate and then onto one of National’s main election policies, the UFB rollout. As a web designer, she would potentially be an ideal beneficiary of the policy.

Bevan Hurley of the Herald on Sunday overheard this conversation and who she would be voting for became the lead angle for a story. After the debate, Hurley pressed Rachel for an answer. Refusing to disclose who she would be voting for come election night, Hurley was told that in previous elections she had voted for at least five different parties and that she wasn’t aligned with any of them. She gave Hurley a few other useful pieces of insight with the caveat that he could use her words but that there was no permission to use either her name or photograph.

Over the course of the next few days, Hurley called multiple times, begging for permission to use Rachel’s name and photograph. He was told repeatedly, by both Rachel and myself, that permission wouldn’t be granted to use either.

If a journalist wanted to research who Rachel might vote for, the picture is complex. One of Rachel’s late grandmothers was a staunch Labour supporter Read more »

Seasoned reporters extremely angry about Mediaworks’ lack of integrity

A true contender for the Sledge of the Year:

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I wish we could have had a non-censored version of Hosking’s thoughts on this.   The fact that a media organisation broke a Reserve Bank embargo while headed by the ex CEO of the NZ Stock Exchange is just unforgivable.   Read more »

Hey Heather, did you know the Herald, who published your column, is a tax dodger too?

So, Heather du Plessis-Allan is being paid to write a column and she chooses tax dodging corporations as her target, failing to mention the tens of millions her employer is under investigation for “evading”.

The plumber is coming around to fix the leaky kitchen sink this week.

I’ve written him a note.

“DON’T EVEN THINK ABOUT ASKING FOR A CASHIE!”

I hope the capitals make it clear we don’t like tax dodgers of his sort.

The only sort of tax dodgers we like are the ones who drive cars as pricey as three-bedroom houses, wear clothing designed by people with Italian names and yet earn a surprisingly low income.

Or, in her case, she is perfectly happy to accept pay from a corporate tax dodger like the NZ Herald.   Read more »

Nippert slammed for tweet in Press Council finding

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Rodney Hide has partially won a Press Council complaint against the NZ Herald and Matt Nippert, one of their more dishonest reporters.

Columnist and former politician Rodney Hide has partially won a Press Council complaint against theNew Zealand Herald in which he took issue with a journalist’s personal tweet.

Mr Hide complained to the Press Council about an article by Herald business journalist Matt Nippert that covered proceedings in the High Court involving David Henderson.

The article referred to earlier proceedings and mentioned the current hearing was “undercutting many of Hide’s claims” he made in previous columns he wrote about the issue.

Mr Hide’s complaint said the article was unfair and inaccurate for a number of reasons but this complaint was not upheld.

Furthermore, Mr Hide filed a secondary complaint about a tweet on Mr Nippert’s personal Twitter account.

“Short write-up of court ruling morphed into 1600-word Greek-style epic featuring crimes, c*nts, lulz and ex-MPs. In @nzheraldbiz Saturday,” the tweet said.

Mr Hide said the tweet lacked accuracy, fairness and balance and was “offensive and displaying a lack of professionalism by a senior journalist.”

Read more »

Herald confused about Al-Azhar

The Herald editorial today buys the peaceful Islam line and that the Egyptian imams coming to take over to “reduce” radicalisation and jihadism are here to help:

It is a measure of this country’s confidence in its Muslim communities that it comes as a surprise to learn clerics are being sent from Egypt to bring a moderating influence to mosques and Islamic centres here as well as in other Western countries. One security observer, Paul Buchanan, called it “perplexing”. Beyond the possibility of “one or two hotheads”, radicalisation was not a problem here, he says. “Australia has a radicalisation problem, we do not.” He can be that categorical because if diatribes against the West and its religion and values were being delivered in mosques and learning centres here, it would be news – just as it has been in Britain, Australia and some other places.

The moderation and maturity of Muslims in New Zealand was evident once again in their response to the Egyptian initiative. Rather than express fearful resentment at the implication they needed a moderating influence, the Federation of Islamic Associations of New Zealand welcomed the imams as emissaries from Egypt’s Al-Azhar university, the oldest and most respected seat of learning in Sunni Islam.

Egypt’s Government is sponsoring this mission to the world and it ought to be welcomed by all concerned.

Read more »

Surely this was an April Fools joke, sadly it isn’t

Some womble called Paul Charman thinks that NZ Post should be protected.

He argues there should be zero job losses at NZ Post because one day in the future the Internet might fail and we’ll need to return to sending letters…and the skills will be lost.

Sadly, he is serious and it wasn’t an April Fool joke.

Bill English has signed off on elimination of 500 more jobs at NZ Post – bad mistake.

Alongside efficient electronic communications, every functional country needs an efficient postal service. If something happens to the first, you can get by using the second.

There is a disturbing chance of New Zealand losing internet service during the next few decades and having to fall back on other means of communication.    Read more »

Half-dozen ignorant people get a right Simon Collins pimping

Simon Collins is pimping the poor again, and the truly stupid.

Almost 3000 Tamaki state housing tenants are being transferred to a new landlord company today, but some still don’t know why the change is happening.

The Tamaki Redevelopment Company, a joint venture owned by the Government and Auckland Council, becomes the new landlord for the 2800 Housing NZ tenants between West Tamaki Rd and the Panmure Basin from this afternoon.

But long-standing tenant Ioela (Niki) Rauti, who successfully resisted an eviction notice last year when her house was earmarked for redevelopment, said she did not feel safe because she did not know why her landlord was changing.

“What’s it all about? Nobody knows,” she said. “We are getting transferred to the Tamaki Housing Association, which is a private holding company [a limited partnership created by the Tamaki Redevelopment Company in January]. Do we feel safe? I don’t think so.”

Ms Rauti, 61, joined other tenants in a protest outside the company’s office in Glen Innes this afternoon.

Read more »

Why can’t the Herald apologists even mention the role of the NZEI?

Kirsty Johnson is basically a union shill at the NZ Herald, always promoting the words, deeds and actions of the NZEI, the PPTA and the NZPF.

However, with the appalling crimes of Robert Burrett she has had to work extra hard not to include her union masters in her columns about who is culpable for this child rapist.

Fairfax has reported the involvement of the NZEI in protecting and covering up for Burrett, but barely a word has been said in the NZ Herald.

Yesterday there were calls for an inquiry but no one in the Herald is calling for the role of the NZEI to be investigated…just everyone else.

Revelations child rapist Robert Burrett was investigated for making sexual comments to a disabled schoolgirl – two years before his arrest – have led to urgent calls for a ministerial inquiry.

Opposition MPs and a lawyer involved in the case are requesting an impartial investigator look into how complaints against Robert Selwyn Burrett were missed for years despite the Ministry of Education receiving several concerning reports about his behaviour.

A Christchurch school has come forward with new details about how the ministry and police dealt with a “completely inappropriate” sexual comment Burrett made to a child in 2013 while working as a ministry-contracted special needs driver.

Before Burrett was arrested in May 2015 for sexually violating a dozen schoolgirls, the Herald is aware the ministry held reports detailing:   Read more »

Does the Herald have an employment programme for ‘special’ people?

Regular readers will know there is no love lost between the NZ Herald and myself. Apart from the fact that they employ inherently dishonest people, people who interview their keyboards and generally are a bunch of muppets, they also seem to have an employment programme for ‘special’ people.

Today they have a story that apparently solves the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle.

A discovery of giant underwater craters at the bottom of Barents Sea could offer a viable explanation to the disappearance of ships in the Bermuda Triangle.

Scientists have found craters up to half a mile wide and 150ft deep, believed to have been caused by build-ups of methane off the coast of natural gas-rich Norway.

The methane would have leaked from deposits of natural gas further below the surface and created cavities which finally bursts, scientists say.

‘Multiple giant craters exist on the sea floor in an area in the west-central Barents Sea … and are probably a cause of enormous blowouts of gas,’ said researchers from the Arctic University of Norway told the Sunday Times (paywall).

Read more »

Herald journalism descends officially into guessing and speculation

They’ve given up all pretense now:

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I wonder what is inside the mind of a Herald journalist who no longer actually reports the news but goes and gets a quick cheap interview from someone who isn’t at all related but is willing to go on record with a few educated guesses?