NZEI

Why does the media just regurgitate obvious bull$#1T?

Look: I get it, the opposition and unions have to tear down the government at every opportunity, and media should report on this.  But to do so without even running it past the sniff test is insane.

A union is blaming underfunding of the education system for why a report is critical of the standard of maths teachers in schools.

And principals say the report doesn’t add up.

The report by public policy think tank the NZ Initiative found that a lack of focus on the basics of maths was behind declining standards in numeracy and said too few primary school teachers have adequate levels of maths to teach the subject.

It recommends that the new Education Council of Aotearoa New Zealand introduces a certificate of maths teaching competency with professional development and training helping teachers gain the skills required.

The primary teachers’ union says teacher training courses do not always provide adequate training in maths and there was a lack of professional development training for teachers.

“The underfunded education system means teachers are not getting the professional development support that they need for optimal maths teaching,” said NZEI Te Riu Roa president Louise Green.

But Education Minister Hekia Parata said underfunding wasn’t the issue.

“We put a lot of funding into professional learning and development and support,” she said. Read more »

Another biased reporter shows her true colours via Twitter

David Farrar takes a break from arthouse play reviews to call out a NZ Herald reporter.

Ferald-bias

There’re three interesting things about this exchange.

  1. Portraying charter schools as exploiting vulnerable kids, rather than helping them
  2. Portraying charter schools as people making money. As far as I know every charter school operator in NZ is a not-for-profit entity
  3. The tweeter is the ’s specialist education reporter

If you were a charter school operator, teacher or parent what confidence would you have that the Herald will report fairly on your school, when the reporter seems to have such a negative view of them.

Read more »

David Cameron makes extension of charter schools programme key to his government

In David Cameron’s speech to the Queen he made a focus of education and the expansion of their charter schools programme.

The second big focus of this Queen’s Speech is championing social justice. That starts with education: a decent schooling for every child, no matter where they’re from. Our school reforms in the last Parliament were bold; one million more children are now learning in good or outstanding schools. In this Parliament they will be bolder still: taking over and turning into Academies not just failing schools but coasting ones too, as part of our new Education and Adoption Bill; opening not just a few more Free Schools, but 500 more.

Read more »

Tagged:

Scumbag NZEI Union attacks teachers!

unnamed

The other day we came across a media release by the Early Childhood Council. Anyone standing up to the intimidation and bullying by scumbag unions deserves a second look

It all started with the Herald’s education writer Kirsty Johnston losing her employer more readers as she swallowed the barbed hook of the NZEI spin winding up parents of young kids.

NZ Educational Institute president Louise Green said: “With corporates, their first priority is to return money to shareholders. In community-based services the first priority is always children.

“I think people can see a lot of money in education. You have to ask yourself why so many people are getting into it.”

Typical union tactic, say it’s all about protecting kids, but really its about attacking businesses.   Read more »

Tagged:

Teacher union lies about “Charter kindies”

The Early Childhood Council has expressed anger at ‘untrue’ NZEI news releases ‘taking lame little pot shots’ at private providers of quality early childhood education.

The statement follows the NZEI’s most recent news release calling for an inquiry into the quality of ‘market-driven’ services.

Council CEO Peter Reynolds said today (21 April 2015) it was not true that privately-owned early childhood education was inferior to community-owned early childhood education, as the NZEI had claimed and reclaimed.

The NZEI had been told exactly this by ERO as recently as 31 March, he said.

Unions are scum.  Anything justifies the means.   Read more »

Tagged:

Reader content: A QUIET review of Special Education

The Ministry of Education has announced a review of the provision of Special Education in New Zealand. Well “announced” is perhaps too stronger word.
Special Education provides support for numerous children in New Zealand with special educational needs. These children have a huge diversity of needs and issues. These issues can range from health issues to blindness to hearing loss to developmental issues to autism to dyslexia – the list goes on.
Provision of Special Education has always been a difficult issue. The range of needs is wide. The support needs are extremely individual. Historically the government has struggled to find a way to meet the range and the individuality.
In recent times organisations advocating in this field have been asking for a review. Minister Parata has obviously listened.
This all sounds well and good… until you try to find out about the review.

Read more »

Another registered teacher before the courts

If you listen to Chris Hipkins having teachers registered is to protect the kids. They oppose charter schools because there is no requirement to have every teacher registered.

Yet almost daily we hear of registered teachers before the courts…they have replaced the Catholic Church as the haven for kiddy fiddlers and sex pests.

A male teacher has denied sending photos of his penis to a 16-year-old student, but admitted sending inappropriate messages, including: “U shw me first”.

The Lower Hutt teacher – who has interim name suppression – was accused of sending the girl photographs of himself and explicit images of his genitals during an inappropriate Facebook exchange.

The teacher was asked to tutor the teenage girl in 2013, an arrangement that continued until the end of school year.    Read more »

Even the Australian media publish the good Charter School news

The left-wing media and their pals in parliament constantly harp on about charter schools on behalf of their union buddies.

They are patch protecting and can produce no real evidence to support their claims.

On the other side of the argument, though, there is building evidence that should start to hush them up.

The problem is in getting that information out there through the filters of the media…like the new Stanford University study of charter schools that even Australian media has highlighted but remains untouched by NZ media.

Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) has a new study out finding urban charter schools outperform traditional public schools (TPS) in urban areas.

The results are the latest in mounting evidence that many charter schools provide tremendous benefit to students — particularly those located in urban areas.

“The charter school sector has gotten to a point of maturity where it’s dominated by established charters that have stood the test of time and are operating a lot more efficiently and effectively for kids, and so we’re starting to see now this general positive impact of charters on student achievement,” Patrick Wolf, PH.D., a distinguished professor in the Department of Education Reform at the University of Arkansas, told Business Insider.

The study looked at 41 urban areas in 22 states. Here’s what it found:     Read more »

Teachers and their unions don’t like the new Education Council. Good

When it comes to professional disciplinary bodies, there is always at least the perception of conflict when the profession sits in judgement of their own.  Lawyers, police, journalists, real estate agents – they all go to their peers to be judged.

The government is taking a sensible step away from this with teachers, and it’s fair to say it’s ruffled some feathers.

Groups representing primary principals and secondary teachers are planning to ignore this week’s call for nominations to the council because they are angry they are losing the right to elect any of the organisation’s members – instead the Education Minister will appoint them all.

The primary teachers’ union is also unhappy, but it will challenge the Government to choose people who represent teachers by running its own nomination process.

The Education Council is replacing the Teachers Council and will be a statutory body rather than an autonomous Crown entity, a change that places it further from government influence.

However, all the new organisation’s nine members will be selected by the Education Minister from a pool of nominees that anyone can put forward.

To be clear – anyone can be nominated.  It doesn’t actually freeze teachers, principals their union mates or any strong advocate out from the process.   Read more »

A textbook case of Teacher Registration and Council secrecy failure

I know I have bored some of you to death with the never-ending examples of bad teachers.  But there is a point to it.  If I didn’t highlight each and every occasion, you simply wouldn’t know the extent of the problem.

There are a number of dimensions to this.  One, is the suppression of any details – sometimes even the name of the teacher and the school.

The other is the fact that Teacher Registration is being held up by teachers and their unions as being an essential component in protecting the children from bad teachers, when the opposite is demonstrably true.

Take this case:

The Teachers Council has confirmed it is investigating the head of an Auckland Charter School which is set to open its doors to students for the first time this week.

Middle School West, in Auckland, was officially opened yesterday, but on Tuesday 130 students will begin their education there.

James Haggett is Principal of the Charter School, a position he took up in November last year. Read more »