Obesity

I knew it. Pies are diet food

steak and cheese pie, pies

Nige will concur, pies are the bomb. A well-packaged gravy milkshake is actually a diet food.

Pies are the food of champions and a diet food all at the same time.

A Christchurch man lost eight kilograms in a month living on pies and beer.

Julian Lee, a reporter for Newshub, became slimmer after four weeks pioneering the pie and pint diet.

Lee ate three to four pies (depending on meat content) every day. Once a week he was allowed to swap one pie for three beers.

When he stepped on the scales live on Wednesday’s Story, he found that he’d lost 8kg. On top of that, his blood pressure had dropped from an unhealthy to a normal level.

Lee modelled his diet on US nutrition professor Mark Haub, whose “convenience store diet” – Doritos, cereal and sugary snacks – made headlines back in 2010.

Like Haub, Lee was aiming to prove that it didn’t matter what you ate when trying to lose weight – what’s important is limiting your calorie intake.

“I liked the point of what [Haub] was doing, and the point of it is that there’s a lot of information out there now, people are really confused about what to eat or what not to eat, it just goes on and on,” he said.

“It used to be that fat was the bad guy, then carbs were the bad guy, now sugar’s the bad guy. Some people, including myself, don’t have any idea about what’s what. I just wanted to prove that all it is is energy in, energy out when it comes to weight management.”

At 1.83 metres tall, it is estimated Lee needs 2500 calories per day to maintain his body weight. On the pie and pint diet, his daily intake was 1600 calories.

Although Lee’s low calorie count seemed to be helping his body, he said the lack of nutrients wasn’t doing his mind any favours.

“Mentally I’m slowing down quite a bit. My body’s loving it but my mind’s really not loving it at all,” he said.

“I’m definitely getting scratchy, like grumpy, scratchy. I’ve taken a multi-vitamin every day, but it’s not enough.”

He said he had been craving the “weirdest things”, including courgettes, boiled eggs, and decent meat. However, the diet hadn’t done anything to put him off pies, and he had no plans to cut them out completely now the diet was over.

“Pies are good, I really do love them. It’s pastry, it’s meat, you can’t go wrong. But again, I’m delusional right now, mentally I’m losing the plot,” Lee said.

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Fat Bastards suffer like they should

The UK has finally implemented an unofficial Fat Bastard Tax, by refusing fatties surgery, preferring instead to treat people who aren’t obese.

Obese people will be routinely refused operations across the NHS, health service bosses have warned, after one authority said it would limit procedures on an unprecedented scale.

Hospital leaders in North Yorkshire said that patients with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or above – as well as smokers – will be barred from most surgery for up to a year amid increasingly desperate measures to plug a funding black hole. The restrictions will apply to standard hip and knee operations.

The decision, described by the Royal College of Surgeons as the “most severe the modern NHS has ever seen”, led to warnings that other trusts will soon be forced to follow suit and rationing will become the norm if the current funding crisis continues.

Chris Hopson, the head of NHS Providers, which represents acute care, ambulance and community services, said: “I think we are going to see more and more decisions like this.

“It’s the only way providers are going to be able to balance their books, and in a way you have to applaud their honesty. You can see why they’re doing this – the service is bursting at the seams.”

[…]    Read more »

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Fatty prison guards forced to pass fitness test

The fatties in the Corrections Union have lost their bid to remain fat bastards and not do fitness assessments.

The prison union has lost its battle about the introduction of fitness tests for guards after arguing they should be paid for their troubles.

Last year the Department of Corrections announced it would introduce a Physical Readiness Assessment (PRA) for its staff to ensure they were able to respond to emergencies.

The six-step test would grade each employee either green, amber or red.

Amber employees would be able to repeat the test in a fortnight and if still graded amber would be provided with support and re-tested in a year.

Red employees would have to submit to further medical and safety assessments to determine if they could remain in their roles or have their duties changed.

It could also result in an employee having to take either paid or unpaid sick leave until they improved their fitness levels.

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A fatty called Substantia (yep) wants us to not judge her bulk. Ok then, she has no soul

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A soulless fatty wants us to stop denigrating fatties.

Ironically her name is Substantia…but looking at her photographs I would have thought she’d be better off changing her name by deed poll to Gargantua.

An activist against denigration of fat people is questioning the belief that obesity is connected to bad health.

Substantia Jones is in New Zealand to speak at a conference on fat issues.

She said fat people were discriminated against and were seldom in power.   Read more »

Adults make better decisions on diet, so dairies close to schools need to be banned

That’s the gist of the argument put forward by the Morgan Foundation:

The Morgan Foundation, started by Gareth Morgan and his family, has made the call in a submission to the Advertising Standards Authority, which is reviewing its code for advertising to children.

Many other submitters are also worried about children being targeted in or around their school environment.

A study released on Wednesday showed schools were surrounded by take-away and convenience stores.

Many of them were decked out in the colours and logos of ice-cream or soft drink brands.

Morgan Foundation general manager Geoff Simmons said that sort of branding should not be near primary schools, nor should billboards advertising junk food.

It was time for the advertising code to be broadened to reflect the way children are bombarded with marketing from many sources, he said.

“In the past we have tended to take a very narrow view of what constitutes junk food marketing to children.

“When we look at the sort of marketing that children actually see it is much broader than the narrow definition of advertising.” Read more »

Health trougher wants to save fat bastards by taxing us all

Robyn Toomath is a health trougher and a socialist. She hasn’t yet met a tax that she doesn’t like.

She appeared on Sunday last night re-iterating what she has written on her blog.

If you stop and ask people on the street, nine out of ten (including the overweight ones) will say that you get fat from over-eating and its no-one’s fault but your own. This is not just due to imperfect understanding of geno-environmental interactions, but because the notions of autonomy and self-control are deeply held (1). So when nihilistic biologists such as myself suggest there is no such thing as free will, it’s not just the libertarians but liberal intellectuals who are offended.

I need to remind myself of this tension between free will and socially determined arguments when I feel frustrated at the persistent framing of obesity as an issue of personal responsibility. But no matter how appealing the idea that we can change our body size if we choose to, the reality is that we can’t. At least, not most of us, and not permanently. Professor Sir Peter Gluckman, the Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor (and obesity expert), said in a recent speech that over his life time he has lost about 100kg in weight, and put about 95kg back on (2). If motivation and education were the keys to staying slim Sir Peter should be as thin as a rake (he’s not).

It’s all very well maintaining a fantasy if it makes us feel better but the personal responsibility myth causes great harm.

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Thank God Woodhouse is not in charge of Health as Coleman says “no” to Sugar Tax

Jonathan Coleman has told the health busy-bodies to go stick their suggestions over a sugar tax.

The Government isn’t fazed  by a group of health professors lobbying to introduce a tax on sugary drinks.

A group of more than 70 health academics from various New Zealand universities want more to be done about the country’s high rate of childhood obesity – the fourth highest in the world.

They say the Government’s action plan of “22 soft strategies that was launched last year with no extra funding” won’t do anything to change the problem.

The group is urging Health Minister Jonathan Coleman to implement a “significant tax” on sugary drinks – the number two recommendation that came out of a report by the World Health Organisation Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity.

But Coleman says the Government’s position hasn’t changed and the professors are on a “different page”.

“There is still no evidence a tax would actually decrease obesity,” he said.

“There is no simple answer otherwise people would have tried it.”

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Otago Uni public health ‘expert’ blog gets it wrong

So much for the University of Otago’s positioning as so-called public health experts.

On Tuesday they raced out a blog post trying to shame Health Minister Jonathan Coleman into supporting a sugar tax on fizzy drinks here in NZ.

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It’s written by the usual anti-sugar troughers. Lets’ remind ourselves who some of them are.

Dr Wilma Waterlander is obviously the lead author. She and Dr Helen Eyles had a lovely time recently at the 5-star Waldorf Astoria Edinburgh with its exciting social programme.

Prof Nick Wilson is a well-known trougher from the Otago University’s Wellington Department of Public Health Troughers, who last year was exposed by the Taxpayers’ Union over his misleading claims over a salt tax.

Then there’s 11-million-dollar woman Professor Cliona Ni Mhurchu, well known for calling for a 20% tax on fat, salt, dairy, meat etc.

But hang on a minute, what’s this? Looks like they’ve been caught out botching their references.   Read more »

There is fat, and then there is morbidly obese. Ms Pause is in the latter category

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Cat Pause is grandstanding again with her pro-fat-bastard stance.

She wants people to stop picking on fatty boomsticks.

It is legal to discriminate against me in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Even though research clearly demonstrates that fat people are discriminated against in educational, employment, and housing, settings, New Zealand hasn’t legislated to make it illegal. In fact, very few places around the world have provided protection for individuals from facing discrimination based on their size.

The Elliot Larsen Civil Rights Acts in the state of Michigan, USA, prohibits discrimination based on weight and height (in addition to the usual categories of race, sex, nationality, etc).

A handful of cities across the United States, including San Francisco and Washington DC have also passed laws against weight discrimination.

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Time for a fat-bastard tax

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Forget sugar taxes, fat taxes or anything else based on ingredients. We should be taxing the fatty not the food the fatty scoffs.

Kiwis are porky and dangerously deluded about it, a new study has found.

While we might tout ourselves as a sports-mad nation, the reality is most of us are hopelessly inactive.

According to a study comparing 11 countries, Kiwis were not only the chubbiest, but were “wildly off the mark” in estimating how fat they were.

While six in 10 were overweight or obese, most thought only 45 per cent of us fitted that description, independent research for the annual Cigna 360° Wellbeing Score found.

Health and nutrition experts are not surprised. “I think it’s normal to be overweight now,” New Zealand Nutrition Foundation dietitian Sarah Hanrahan said.   Read more »