Obesity

The answer to people who want to eat and diet at the same time

As Blubbergeddon is a little on the back burner for a number of us, the latest in surgical “marvels” eliminates the need for any self discipline

In a new attempt to control New Zealand’s obesity epidemic, severely overweight patients will have a stomach drain installed through which they pump out excess food.

Middlemore Hospital in South Auckland will run a trial of a device called Aspire Assist, which is installed in a 20-minute outpatient visit requiring no more than conscious sedation.

The backers of the technique view it as a relatively straightforward alternative to state-funded obesity surgery, for which the hospital is unable to meet demand.

Weight can be hard to shed and keep off long term. Thirty per cent of Kiwi adults and 10 per cent of children are obese. New Zealand is the third most obese of developed countries, although some Pacific island states have rates twice as high.

The Aspire Assist device involves joining the stomach to an external valve, via a tube through a hole in the skin. Twenty minutes after meals, the patient connects a hand-operated pump to the valve and drains around 30 per cent of the stomach’s contents into a special container for disposal – unwanted calories discarded before they can be absorbed by the body.

If I have to be absolutely honest with you, this would be the sort of life style gadget that I’d love to have.   I love my food.  I love tastes and textures and crunch.  It’s not about hunger as much as it is about the experience.   Read more »

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Skinny trougher who wants to tax sugar says we have to be nice to fat sheilas at the same time

Boyd Swinburn really takes the cake.

In an article about how fat sheilas perform in the cot, apparently they are hot in the cot, he tells us that fat shaming is dreadful.

Except this trougher has made it his life’s ambition to bang on about obesity and dream up new ways to tax us all into slim-ness.

Boyd Swinburn, professor of population nutrition at the University of Auckland, said overweight people being portrayed as unattractive on television did little to tackle the growing obesity problem.

“The situation is similar to the fashion industry where models are traditionally stick-thin,” he said. “If all people see on television is beautiful people having sex, it could encourage further low self esteem among those with weight issues.”

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Failure of fast food ban on South L.A.

The Doug Sellman’s and Boyd Swinburn’s of this world want sugar taxes, bans on fast food and labelling of what they call “unhealthy” products.

The main problem, apart from their control freak nature, is that they don’t work in combatting obesity.

The evidence is there for all to see.

The national discourse about health and obesity has never been a particularly cordial conversation.

In 2008, it hit a tendentious peak when a ban on new fast-food restaurants in South Los Angeles brought the term “food apartheid” to the table. The ordinance, which was implemented in a part of the city that is both disproportionately poor and obese, came as a response to the idea that there are two different systems for accessing food in Los Angeles, one with more limited options in an economically depressed part of the city that is predominantly black and Latino, and the other with more variety in more affluent neighborhoods.

Ban this, block that…no bottle stores near schools, stop fast food joints opening up…never is there a though about personal choice in the matter. Sugar taxes and bans and plain packaging will work they tell us.

Yeah, nah.

[T]he South Los Angeles ban was unprecedented in that it was the first to connect a policy to the obesity epidemic. The ordinance didn’t shutter existing restaurants, but it did block construction of new stand-alone fast-food restaurants in an area with 700,000 residents. (That’s a population that, if separated from the rest of Los Angeles, would still make one of the U.S.’s 20 largest cities.) The effort also dovetailed with an initiative to encourage supermarkets and stores with presumably healthier fare to move in.

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Fattism is a legitimate form of discrimination

James Delingpole gets stuck into fat bastards.

Breitbart London’s Executive Editor, James Delingpole, has appeared on the BBC Daily Politics to attack moves to award fat people minority status. He said that he hoped fat people would be “stigmatised” rather than government stepping in.

Delingpole claimed some of his greatest idols were fat, including Eric Pickles and Jabba The Hut but they were still a burden on the taxpayer.

CAUTION:  Video Auto Starts (we try to normally not do that, but… there you go)   Read more »

Fat bastards could lose benefits in UK, what a great policy

David Cameron says UK taxpayers shouldn’t have to “fund the benefits” of fatties or drug and alcohol addicts who refuse treatment that could help them get back into employment.

Obese people could have their benefits stripped if they refuse treatment in a bid to ensure they can lead a “fulfilling life”, David Cameron has said.

A Conservative government will attempt to ensure that tens of thousands of people who claim welfare on the grounds of obesity, drug or alcohol addiction are “incentivised” to go back to work, the Prime Minister said.

Mr Cameron said that taxpayers should no longer “fund the benefits” of people who refuse to accept the treatment that could help them get back into employment.

He has asked Professor Dame Carol Black, a senior Government adviser of health, to conduct a review into how best to get people with treatable conditions back into work.

The review will focus on how to incentivise the people to get back to work and consider whether their benefits should be stopped if they refuse treatment.

Currently, almost 100,000 people are claiming sickness benefits because they say they are suffering from conditions such as drug or alcohol addiction, or obesity.

However, there is no requirement for such people to undertake treatment, meaning it is possible to claim without making efforts at recovery.

Of the 2.5 million claiming sickness benefits, around 1.5 million have been claiming for more than 5 years.  Read more »

NZ Junk food manufacturers in for tough 2015

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Companies making ‘junk food’ look as though they’re in for a tough year.

If it wasn’t the Aussie council seeking to ban chips, chocolate and sugary drinks from parks, it is now UK ‘experts’ calling for a ban on junk food adverts.

The usual health experts suspects are calling for bans on junk food TV ads, saying they shouldn’t be aired before 9pm in the hope that parents will stop getting pressured by their kids wanting ‘unhealthy food and sugary drinks’.

The British Heart Foundation is saying ‘seven in ten parents with children aged four to 16 have been pestered by their children to buy junk food they have seen advertised on TV.’    Read more »

This is why we need a FBT

This is why we need  Fat Bastards Tax, that taxes the fat bastard not the fat or the sugar.

I’ll just bet fat bastards will soon start demanding the NZ government funds this new drug.

A treatment of injections that can help people lost a stone more than they normally would by dieting or exercising more has been approved by health watchdogs.

Liraglutide, which has been described by doctors as life-changing, could be available on prescription in months.

Slimmers typically lose almost a stone more than they would by simply watching how many calories they consume and doing more exercise.

Trials showed that some severely obese patients lost so much weight they were able to abandon their wheelchairs and walk normally for the first time in years.

Liraglutide also lowers blood pressure, raises good cholesterol and prevents diabetes.According to its makers, Novo Nordisk of Denmark, the drug even produces a ‘feel-good factor’, making dieting a pleasure.But some experts have already warned it does not provide a long-term solution to the growing problem of obesity in Britain.

Novo Nordisk will apply for it to be prescribed on the NHS after Friday’s ruling by the European drugs regulator that it is safe and effective.

There are fears however that Nice – Britain’s drugs rationing body – will judge it too expensive for routine use on the NHS.

Liraglutide costs from ÂŁ2.25 a day, which is roughly double the price of Orlistat, the only other prescription diet drug.

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Could depression just be an allergic reaction?

Could depression actually be nothing more than an allergic reaction?

Our understanding and awareness of depression has, thankfully, evolved some way beyond the old-fashioned “pull-yourself-together” response. Most now know that it’s a multifaceted, shape-shifting, and frequently debilitating condition that transcends race, sex, and creed. But we still don’t know exactly why some become depressed and some don’t.

We know that people may be genetically predisposed to depression and anxiety disorders. We also know that specific life events may trigger depressive episodes in those who have previously been the picture of mental health. But so far we’ve been unable to identify one single, definitive catalyst. However, new research suggests that, for some people, depression may be caused by something as simple as an allergic reaction. A reaction to inflammation—a product of the body, not the mind.

George Slavich, a clinical psychologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, is one of an increasing number of scientists who believe we need to be looking at our physiology to better understand depression—that, perhaps, it’s not all in the head. “I don’t even talk about it as a psychiatric condition anymore,” he told the Guardian. “It does involve psychology, but it also involves equal parts of biology and physical health.”

The thesis is simple: Everyone feels like shit when they’re sick. That ennui we feel when we’re unwell—listlessness, lack of enthusiasm, troubled sleep, tearfulness, and a general feeling of wading through tar—is apparently known among psychologists as “sickness behavior.” Our bodies are pretty intelligent, see—they behave this way so that we stop, lie still, and let our system fight whatever infection of virus has us croaking for Gatorade on the couch.

These kinds of emotional responses are also typical of depression, though. So scientists are asking: If sick people feel and act a lot like depressed people, might there be a link?

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Healthy fat people are a mirage

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Some big people are fat but don’t have any of the obesity markers such as diabetes or high blood pressure.  These people are held up as “proof” that you can be “healthy obese”.

Not so.

Scientists at University College London tracked more than 2500 people for 20 years – the longest study of its kind – and found that obese people became progressively less healthy over time.

The research supported previous findings that showed as time passes, overweight people face a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attacks, stroke, and some types of cancer compared to thin people. Read more »

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Too fat to work, and the government is to blame

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Stephen Beer and Michelle Coombe, are from Plymouth, where 60 per cent of adults are overweight. The couple, who weigh more than 354 kg between them and claim $4,000 a month in benefits ($48k per year), have wed in a $6,000 ceremony – paid for by the taxpayer.

They can’t work, and it is not their fault.  Apparently.   Read more »

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