Pakistan

Faces of the day

Today’s faces of the day are the nine teachers who were killed trying to protect their students in Peshawar. ( Photos taken from Daily Mail.co.uk )

Beenish Pervaiz

Tahira Kazi

Saeed Khan

Afsha Ahmed

Hifsa Khush and four other brave teachers whose names are unknown at this time.

I honour them for their bravery.

I will let their students’ words below, be their memorial.

 

Beenish Pervaiz (pictured back left with her family), a former student at the University of Greenwich, was reportedly one of the teachers who was slaughtered by gunmen as she tried to help her young pupils

Gunned down and blown up: A photograph reportedly showing five of the teachers (circled) who died in the Pakistan massacre when Taliban gunmen and suicide bombers killed 148 children and staff at the school

Gunned down and blown up: A photograph reportedly showing five of the teachers (circled) who died in the Pakistan massacre when Taliban gunmen and suicide bombers killed 148 children and staff at the school

Tahira Kazi, the principal of the Army Public School and College in Peshawar, died after she was reportedly set on fire by Taliban militants in front of her pupils. She is pictured with a man believed to be her son

Tahira Kazi, the principal of the Army Public School and College in Peshawar, died after she was reportedly set on fire by Taliban militants in front of her pupils. She is pictured with a man believed to be her son

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An enemy that targets children

Then people brought little children to Jesus for him to place his hands on them and pray for them. But the disciples rebuked them.

Jesus said, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.”

-biblehub.com

School pupil Mohammad Baqair lost his mother, a teacher, in the attack  -BBC

School pupil Mohammad Baqair lost his mother, a teacher, in the attack
-BBC

Militants from the Pakistani Taliban have attacked an army-run school in Peshawar, killing 141 people, 132 of them children, the military say.

Officials say the attack in the north-western city is over, with all the attackers killed. Seven militants took part in all, according to the army.

Seven militants was all it took to massacre 132 children. Seven. One militant with a suicide vest or a remote controlled bomb can kill even more. Next time you are told that the enemy are in the minority remember this massacre. Remember what a ruthless enemy that targets children can do with only tiny numbers. Remember.

Scores of survivors are being treated in hospitals as frantic parents search for news of their children.

The attack – the Taliban’s deadliest in Pakistan – has been widely condemned.

Describing the attack from his hospital bed to the BBC’s Shaimaa Khalil, Shahrukh Khan, 17, said a gunman had entered his classroom and opened fire at random.

As he hid under a desk, he saw his friends being shot, one in the head and one in the chest. Two teachers were also killed…

…A Taliban spokesman told BBC Urdu that the school, which is run by the army, had been targeted in response to military operations.

…US President Barack Obama said terrorists had “once again shown their depravity” while UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said it was “an act of horror and rank cowardice”.

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Adherents of the Religion of Peace beat two Christians to death with shovels

Once again the adherents of the religion of peace have proven what a barbaric and medieval belief system they have…and want to force on the rest of the world.

Pakistani police have arrested at least 43 suspects in connection with Tuesday’s killing of a Christian couple accused of desecrating the Koran.

Reports say the couple were beaten to death by hundreds of locals who then burned their bodies in the brick kiln where they worked in Punjab province.

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif called the murders “an unacceptable crime”.

Allegations of blasphemy are often used in Pakistan to settle personal scores or to target members of minorities.

Police say the suspects are due to appear in court on Wednesday in Lahore. The victims have been identified as Shehzad Masih and his wife Shama.

About 200 people in Lahore, mainly from the Christian community and human rights organisations, protested against the killings, which took place in the town of Kot Radha Kishan about 60km (40 miles) to the south-west.

They held signs saying “Christian carnage in the name of blasphemy should be stopped” and “the government has failed to give protection to minorities”, BBC Urdu’s Shumaila Jaffrey reports from Lahore.

Union leader Farooq Tariq told the BBC that the dispute was actually over money.

“The owner of the brick kiln gave it a religious colour, and they locked up the Christian woman Shama for two days, then attacked her with shovels, then tortured her husband and threw them in the brick kiln.

“It’s the worst misuse of religion,” he said.

In a statement, Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif said “a responsible state cannot tolerate mob rule and public lynching with impunity”.

“The Pakistani state has to act proactively to protect its minorities from violence and injustice.”

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This explains a lot

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Many people can’t fathom the crazies of Islam, and you’ve all heard the epithet “mad Mullahs”…but it seems that there may be sound reasoning as to why they seem unable to act like reasonable human beings.

Inbreeding…I’m not kidding. It seems cousin shagging is all the rage amongst Islamic nations and peoples.

Nikolai Sennels is a Danish psychologist who has done extensive research into a little-known problem in the Muslim world: the disastrous results of Muslim inbreeding brought about by the marriage of first cousins.

This practice, which has been prohibited in the Judeo-Christian tradition since the days of Moses, was sanctioned by Muhammad and has been going on now for 1,400 years in the Muslim world. This practice of inbreeding will never go away, since Muhammad is the ultimate example and authority on all matters, including marriage.

The massive inbreeding in Muslim culture may well have done irreversible damage to the Muslim gene pool and extensive damage to its intelligence, sanity, and health.

According to Sennels, close to half of all Muslims in the world are inbred. In Pakistan, the number approaches 70%. Even in England, more than half of Pakistani immigrants are married to their first cousins, and in Denmark the number of inbred Pakistani immigrants is around 40%.

The numbers are equally devastating in other important Muslim countries: 67% in Saudi Arabia, 64% in Jordan and Kuwait, 63% in Sudan, 60% in Iraq, and 54% in the United Arab Emirates and Qatar.   Read more »

Another example of the Religion of Peace and its lack of tolerance

Asia Bibi did nothing more than drink some water from a well, the problem for her was that she was a christian and the muslim women objected because she had now tainted the water…and then the problems really started, Asia Bibi told them that she thought that Mohammed wouldn’t agree with them. She is now in jail in Pakistan awaiting execution after being sentenced to death for blasphemy, and Pakistan’s High Court has upheld the sentence.

The religion of peace and tolerance? Yeah, nah.

A high court in Pakistan on Thursday upheld the death sentence for Asia Bibi, a Christian mother of five who in 2010 became the first Pakistani woman to be sentenced to death for “blasphemy,” after Muslim fellow laborers accused her of insulting Mohammed.

After the high court in the Punjab provincial capital Lahore dismissed Asia’s appeal, an organization that campaigns against Pakistan’s notorious laws accused the panel’s two judges of being swayed by about 25 Islamic clerics who it said were present in the courtroom “to apply pressure.”

The accusation was made by the Center for Legal Aid, Assistance and Settlement (CLAAS), an organization with branches in Pakistan and Britain that provides legal assistance to Christians accused under the blasphemy laws.

“I am very disappointed with today’s result and my thoughts and prayers are with Asia’s family,” said CLAAS-UK director Nasir Saeed. Read more »

About those receding Himalayan glaciers that will rob the sub-continent of water

Remember the fuss about the receding Himalayan glaciers that were going to disappear because of global warming…and the perilous tales peddled about the sub-continent running out of water as a result?

Yeah, well it turns out that those stories were yet more lies in the ongoing lie-fest over global warming.

Glaciers around the world are melting, retreating and even vanishing altogether. But in the mountainous Karakoram region of Asia — home to K2, the second highest peak on Earth — the glaciers aren’t melting. If anything, some are expanding.

Now, scientists have found an explanation for this mysterious glacial stability. While precipitation is increasing across the Himalayas, most of this moisture drops in the summer — except in Karakoram, where snow dominates the scene.

“It’s been a source of controversy that these glaciers haven’t been changing while other glaciers in the world have,” said study researcher Sarah Kapnick, a postdoctoral researcher in atmospheric and ocean sciences at Princeton University.

“This gives a reasoning for why you can have increased snowfall in a region and have increased glaciers or stable glaciers in a warming world,” Kapnick told Live Science.

The Karakoram is a picturesque chain of snowy peaks along the border of India, Pakistan and China. It’s part of the larger Himalaya mountain chain, which is losing its glaciers as the climate warms.

Yet observations in the Karakoram region reveal that the glaciers there are stable, and snowfall is increasing instead of decreasing.

“I really wanted to dive deeply into why that is,” Kapnick said.   Read more »

Sheik Mohammed comments on ISIS

 

Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum is the current ruler of Dubai and he has penned an opinion piece on ISIS.

That alone makes me want to read it. A Middle East leader of a vibrant modern nation commenting on ISIS…its worth a read in full.

The global financial crisis taught the world how profoundly interdependent our economies have become. In today’s crisis of extremism, we must recognize that we are just as interdependent for our security, as is clear in the current struggle to defeat ISIS.

If we are to prevent ISIS from teaching us this lesson the hard way, we must acknowledge that we cannot extinguish the fires of fanaticism by force alone. The world must unite behind a holistic drive to discredit the ideology that gives extremists their power, and to restore hope and dignity to those whom they would recruit.

ISIS certainly can – and will – be defeated militarily by the international coalition that is now assembling and which the UAE is actively supporting. But military containment is only a partial solution. Lasting peace requires three other ingredients: winning the battle of ideas; upgrading weak governance; and supporting grassroots human development.

Such a solution must begin with concerted international political will. Not a single politician in North America, Europe, Africa, or Asia can afford to ignore events in the Middle East. A globalized threat requires a globalized response. Everyone will feel the heat, because such flames know no borders; indeed, ISIS has recruited members of at least 80 nationalities.

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Faces of the day

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An insiders guide to reporting on Israel/Gaza conflict

Journalists over looking Gaza from Sderot   Photo/ Cam Slater, Whaleoil Media

Journalists over looking Gaza from Sderot Photo/ Cam Slater, Whaleoil Media

Tablet has an essay about the media manipulations in reporting the Israel/Gaza conflict.

It is by  Matti Friedman who is a former AP correspondent who explains how and why reporters get Israel so wrong, and why it matters. What she writes echoes what I saw in Israel.

The lasting importance of this summer’s war, I believe, doesn’t lie in the war itself. It lies instead in the way the war has been described and responded to abroad, and the way this has laid bare the resurgence of an old, twisted pattern of thought and its migration from the margins to the mainstream of Western discourse—namely, a hostile obsession with Jews. The key to understanding this resurgence is not to be found among jihadi webmasters, basement conspiracy theorists, or radical activists. It is instead to be found first among the educated and respectable people who populate the international news industry; decent people, many of them, and some of them my former colleagues.

While global mania about Israeli actions has come to be taken for granted, it is actually the result of decisions made by individual human beings in positions of responsibility—in this case, journalists and editors. The world is not responding to events in this country, but rather to the description of these events by news organizations. The key to understanding the strange nature of the response is thus to be found in the practice of journalism, and specifically in a severe malfunction that is occurring in that profession—my profession—here in Israel.

She looks at the disproportionate staffing and reporting on Israel compared with other countries.

Staffing is the best measure of the importance of a story to a particular news organization. When I was a correspondent at the AP, the agency had more than 40 staffers covering Israel and the Palestinian territories. That was significantly more news staff than the AP had in China, Russia, or India, or in all of the 50 countries of sub-Saharan Africa combined. It was higher than the total number of news-gathering employees in all the countries where the uprisings of the “Arab Spring” eventually erupted.

To offer a sense of scale: Before the outbreak of the civil war in Syria, the permanent AP presence in that country consisted of a single regime-approved stringer. The AP’s editors believed, that is, that Syria’s importance was less than one-40th that of Israel. I don’t mean to pick on the AP—the agency is wholly average, which makes it useful as an example. The big players in the news business practice groupthink, and these staffing arrangements were reflected across the herd. Staffing levels in Israel have decreased somewhat since the Arab uprisings began, but remain high. And when Israel flares up, as it did this summer, reporters are often moved from deadlier conflicts. Israel still trumps nearly everything else.

The volume of press coverage that results, even when little is going on, gives this conflict a prominence compared to which its actual human toll is absurdly small. In all of 2013, for example, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict claimed 42 lives—that is, roughly the monthly homicide rate in the city of Chicago. Jerusalem, internationally renowned as a city of conflict, had slightly fewer violent deaths per capita last year than Portland, Ore., one of America’s safer cities. In contrast, in three years the Syrian conflict has claimed an estimated 190,000 lives, or about 70,000 more than the number of people who have ever died in the Arab-Israeli conflict since it began a century ago.

News organizations have nonetheless decided that this conflict is more important than, for example, the more than 1,600 women murdered in Pakistan last year (271 after being raped and 193 of them burned alive), the ongoing erasure of Tibet by the Chinese Communist Party, the carnage in Congo (more than 5 million dead as of 2012) or the Central African Republic, and the drug wars in Mexico (death toll between 2006 and 2012: 60,000), let alone conflicts no one has ever heard of in obscure corners of India or Thailand. They believe Israel to be the most important story on earth, or very close.

That is an indictment in itself right there. That is a massive news imbalance.    Read more »

Face of the day

Her real face

Her real face

Above is an actual non photo-shopped photo of a woman called Esther Honig.

She decided to do an experiment using Photo shop in order to

examine how the standards of unobtainable beauty vary across cultures on a global level.

-au.eonline.com

They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder so she altered her face in a series of photos to reflect the beauty ideals of the following eight countries.

Can you match the photo to the country? ( Answers below )

Which photo do you think is the most beautiful?

My favourite was photo D. When I showed Cam and both my children they also chose D.

Philippines, Argentina, Bulgaria, Morocco, Pakistan, United States,United Kingdom, Bulgaria

 

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