Paula Bennett

Local community tells bludger to stop moaning and to try and fit in

In a refreshing article on Stuff they have provided balance by doing an article that gives the other side of the story other than the story of an embittered bludger.

Western Community Centre manager Neil Tolan says the Nawton community has plenty of positives after it was branded a “hellhole” by a disgruntled resident.

A Nawton community advocate is sticking up for his suburb after it was described by an disgruntled Aucklander as a hellhole.

…Auckland beneficiary Teri Standen went public on Thursday to say she had been living in Nawton for five months after accepting a $3510.50 Housing New Zealand relocation grant, but would rather live in a caravan in Auckland.

Standen said there are gangs in the area, her 12-year-old son has been bullied at school and she won’t let her 19-year-old daughter walk home from the bus stop.

“Unfortunately, the good things in communities don’t get the spotlight they deserve,” Tolan said in reply.

“Elliot Park is pumping every night with sports teams training and families down here watching. Our local shopping centre, our custodian there does a massive job polishing bins and making sure car parks are there for disability people. Teachers are working late at night. There is a real pride.”

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Social Housing Minister Amy Adams is enduring Paula Bennett’s hospital pass

Paula Bennett’s old job was done so well, she got promoted to Deputy PM.  Except in reality it was done so poorly, Amy Adams is now having to face the music.

The official waiting list for social housing has risen again to nearly 4800 households, nearly half of whom are in Auckland.

The waiting list is now at its highest level since it was transferred to Work and Income in mid-2014.

Figures released by new Social Housing Minister Amy Adams today show the number of people on the list jumped by 169 in the last three months of 2016 to 4771 – an increase of 3.7 per cent. Over the last year, the list grew by 37.3 per cent.

The increase was driven mostly by demand in Auckland, where the list grew by 153 people to 2060. The biggest increases were in South Auckland suburbs such as Mangere, Otara and Manurewa.

The waiting list also grew in Hamilton, but fell in other main centres such as Christchurch and Wellington.

John Key was quite keen to see this area sorted before the elections, but it remains to be seen if Bill English will empower Adams to do anything about it.   Paula Bennett became the minister of Announcing solutions, but all of these had 2-4 year realisation periods. Read more »

English defending Bennett’s feminism; unsure of what it actually means himself

If your new minister needs defending a few days into her job then she really isn’t fit for it is she?

And why is a grey old male defending the feminism of a woman? Surely she can do that herself…you know if her feminisim credentials are right up there?

New Zealand’s new Minister for Women says she’s only a feminist some days and the rest of the time she just gets on with it.

Prime Minister Bill English has backed his deputy Paula Bennett’s stance on feminism, saying it doesn’t matter what label a person uses it’s what they do that really counts.

Mr English says he doesn’t identify himself as a feminist, admitting “I wouldn’t quite know what that means”.

“I don’t really mind whether people call themselves a feminist or not a feminist,” he said.   Read more »

Trotter on Bill English and Paula Bennett…it’s not what you think

Chris Trotter has an interest piece on The Daily Bog about Bill English and Paula Bennett…and it is brilliant:

Those high-drama, high-risk moments in a nation’s history, when the political adrenalin is coursing through the body politic, are precisely the moments when rushing to any sort of judgement – let alone action – is the worst possible thing politicians, journalists and political activists can do.

John Key’s resignation, for example, was just such a moment of high political drama and risk. People got excited. Adrenalin flowed. Our collective judgement was shot. All sorts of stupid mistakes – and statements – were made, and all sorts of silly stories were published and posted. What the country needed was someone to drive it around for a while and give it a chance to decompress.

Because Bill English is not some sort of Jesuit torturer just aching to draw blood with his newly acquired political instruments. Nor is Paula Bennet a whip-wielding Westie dominatrix in spiked heels and a leopard-skin corset. These two human-beings are nothing more, nor less, than National Party politicians – and by no means the worst of their breed.   Read more »

Abrasive Bennett told to smooth talk the back benchers

And people thought Judith Collins was polarising?

Paula Bennett has been told to change the habit of her political lifetime and start treating backbenchers like human beings instead of mushrooms.

Bill English has given Deputy Prime Minister Paula Bennett a special role in involving National’s backbench more in the party.

The move comes after bids by Jonathan Coleman for Prime Minister and Simon Bridges for Deputy Prime Minister were mounted on the back of disgruntlement by backbenchers that they were shut out of the action.

English said there was a natural opportunity for broader caucus involvement in the 2017 election year.

He acknowledged the domination of Key in selling the Government.   Read more »

Bill stood up and answered some questions, and Audrey needs a fresh set of knickers

The Press Gallery really are pathetic at times. Audrey Young got sticky knickers because Bill English had a decent press conference.

The Labour Party was quietly thrilled last week after getting over the shock of John Key’s resignation as Prime Minister and his endorsement of Bill English.

It has less reason to be thrilled after English’s election as leader and appointment as Prime Minister.

In a 40-minute press conference he showed a political dexterity that would have matched Key and a depth that surpassed him.

Key was usually well briefed and could answer most questions.

Even when he had nothing to say, he could say it rather well.   Read more »

Watch out Bill, Paula’s lining you up

Radio NZ had a schlock piece yesterday about Paula Bennett, where they bizarrely said she was sharp.

She may well be dumber than a bag of hammers but she is sharp…or at least her axe is, and her requirement for proper cutlery with her breakfast of eggs served at her desk (no glad wrap and a proper plate too). Just ask any of her staff she dismissed, or any CEOs of department who have been called into her office without notice and roasted when they didn’t have any briefing papers with them.

In the last few years however, Mrs Bennett has made an obvious effort to take on heftier portfolios (including climate change that she cheerfully admitted she knew nothing about), and associate finance, where she has worked closely with the presumptive Prime Minister Bill English.

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Bridges to quit race, English’s “Dream” team is annointed

The hand over planned by John Key and Bill  English months ago now appears complete.

The bullying, standover and threats have worked and now Simon Bridges is withdrawing from the race.

Simon Bridges is expected to withdraw from the contest to be National’s deputy leader today – handing it to Paula Bennett.

Bennett had public declarations of support from 23 MPs last night to Bridges’ 10 – and was understood to have enough private support to get her over the 30 votes needed in National’s caucus of 59.

The caucus was due to vote on it on Monday, but unless there is a last minute entry at that caucus meeting it appears set to be a pro forma appointment.   Read more »

Bennett v Bridges: two token choices, either a mistake

When you are built for comfort not speed entering via the back door is often easier.

Labour are salivating over the apparent ascendancy of Paula Bennett. They are hoping like hell that Hekia Parata and her bullying team keep threatening backbenchers to declare for Paula.

They have more than enough dirt on her, including one of their own who has intimate knowledge of Paula Bennett. Then there are all the stories of her revolving door for staff and staff issues. Screaming at staff like Jake the Muss for not fixing her some eggs with alacrity isn’t really the way a deputy should behave.

Simon Bridges is promoting himself as the person to, hold Bill English in check, but he doesn’t have the bullying teams helping him that Bill English does. Affectionately known as “Justin” by his former girlfriends he is lagging behind in the deputy stakes.

Radio NZ reports:

Bill English might have cemented his position as Prime Minister but National Party MPs still have to decide who will be his deputy.

Barring any last minute candidates the MPs have to choose between westie Paula Bennett or the more urbane Simon Bridges.   Read more »

The contenders?

Radio NZ has prepared a list of contenders for John Key’s job:

Prime Minister John Key’s surprise announcement that he is standing down, after 10 years at the helm of the National Party and nearly nine as PM, will have the contenders jockeying for position before the caucus vote on 12 December.

Mr Key said whoever was chosen as the next leader would have his “unwavering support”, but if his right-hand man – Deputy Prime Minister Bill English – put his name forward, he would support his bid.

Mr Key and Mr English have been the closest of partners but there will likely be challengers from the caucus.

Here’s a quick rundown of who might consider themselves leadership material:

Bill English

A former leader of the National Party in the early noughties, Mr English has been a steady hand on the economic tiller and Deputy Prime Minister since 2008. He knows politics inside out – having been an MP since 1990 – and has held a number of other high-profile positions including Minister for Infrastructure and Leader of the Opposition.

Speaking at a media stand-up this afternoon, Mr English refused to be drawn on whether he would seek the leadership, saying he needed to talk to his family and members of the caucus first.

But Mr English said he will probably announce his decision tomorrow and wanted to make sure he had enough caucus support.

Mr English, who led the National Party to its worst election defeat in 2002, said he had learned a lot since then.

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