Peter Goodfellow

The advent of political Mega-donors

The best thing about Kim Dotcom pouring millions into this election is that he has set the benchmark for all other parties…and it is the left-wing that has done it.

Previously we have had whinging from unions, Labour and the Greens about donations like that from Tony Astle or from chinese donors…but that was always small beer compared to the union cash, Owen Glenn’s half million to Labour and now Kim Dotcom’s millions to the Internet party.

Labour attacked Simon Lusk for daring to write a paper which some disaffected and myopic Nats leaked to them, where he advocated for the professionalisation of politics. Precisely that which Kim Dotcom is now doing.

We haven’t heard a peep really though from Trevor Mallard about German bagmen, or paid professionals, and nor will we…because when the left do it then everything is ok.

We have now entered an era of big money in politics and there isn’t a damn thing that can be done to stop it. I welcome the advent of this…and quietly snigger at the trap the left has set for themselves.

National though needs to clean out the board and any fool holding positions that hankers for the era of amateurism in politics. They need to go, because like with Rugby Union the inevitable has happened, and it is now time for the professionals. Peter Goodfellow, Alistair Bell and any other office holder who advocated for the “Lusk Clause” in candidate training needs to quit. The party now needs to mobilise and raise proper funds and set up a formalised training programme that recognises true political talent and encourages that.   Read more »

So why did you support MMP then Bill?

I have repeatedly written about the strategic stupidity of the National party.

At the last election there was a referendum about voting systems and the “brains” trust of National, which included the idiot Peter Goodfellow as well as John Key, Steven Joyce, Gerry Brownlee and Bill English resolved to do absolutely nothing about taking a position on MMP. Instead they let the unions and the opposition all lobby for the retention of a system that lets a coalition of the losers take power.

Now Bill English is crying rivers of tears about it all.

Labour could still win power at the next election, National deputy leader and Finance Minister Bill English said in a speech warning against complacency.

“The Opposition can be divided, it can have many leaders and co-leaders, it can have no vision, very little policy, be disorganised but under MMP it can win and we need to remember that every single day.”

Mr English was speaking at National’s northern regional conference in Auckland this morning.

He said National would need to win the highest vote any incumbent Government had ever won – it was re-elected for a second term in 2011 with 47.31 per cent of the vote.

Read more »

Didn’t anybody warn her?

Peter Goodfellow and Desley Simpson. Photo / Norrie Montgomery

Peter Goodfellow and Desley Simpson. Photo / Norrie Montgomery

National Party powerbrokers Peter Goodfellow and long-term partner Desley Simpson have married in an intimate service at a resthome.

Goodfellow, president of the National Party and heir to a $500 million fortune, married Simpson in a chapel at the resthome of St Andrew’s Village in Glendowie where his elderly father lives. Read more »

Why is National so useless at selections?

Party President Peter “Dopey” Goodfellow needs to be held to account for the tardy selection process that means National is running seriously late with their selections.

Good candidates on the ground lift the all important party vote, yet there are some seats that havent even got a date for selection.

Electorate

Nominations Open
Nominations Close

Maungakiekie**

12th April
28th April

Wigram

15th April
30th April

Dunedin South

19th April
2nd May   Read more »

John Howard on parties, membership and ideology

John Howard was interviewed by The Australian in Australia and offers some interesting perspectives on political parties, membership and ideology.

“All political parties need reform,” Howard said in an interview with this columnist to mark the 40th anniversary of his election to parliament.

“The greatest problem that my party has, the greatest problem the Labor Party has, is that we no longer pursue with zeal the idea of expanding the membership.”

The problem has become ­particularly acute for Labor.

The party’s terrible result in the West Australian Senate ­election underscores the need for reform.

With its two lead candidates beholden to unions and each representing polar ideological ­extremes, it is not surprising Labor received a dismal 22 per cent of the vote.

Both Labour and National face similar issues here, though I suspect Labour’s issue is more pressing.

When Howard joined the Young Liberals as an 18 year old in the late 1950s, he said it was the “mission” of every member to ­recruit new members.

“We spend too much time arguing about what the existing membership does rather than throwing open the doors to new members.”

However, given the loss of members in both major parties, retaining new members has ­become a life or death matter. At Labor’s peak in the 1930s, it boasted a membership of more than 150,000. The Liberals had a membership of more than 150,000 in the 1950s.

Today, membership of both major parties has declined even though the population has expanded. Labor and the Liberals each have about 45,000 members nationally.

“People don’t join local sporting clubs, local churches, local service clubs and political parties the way they did 50 years ago,” Howard says.  Read more »

More National Selection Skullduggery

Fresh on the heels of the extremely dodgy and hopelessly compromised electorate chair in Hunua Ian McDougall blackballing two long serving National Party members and local body representatives the tipline is running hot about the party trying to blackball Jo Hayes in Wairarapa.

Those who don’t know Jo need to be aware that Jo is from the Rangitikei but took one for the team running in Dunedin, and did a fantastic job, so much so that senior members of Michael Woodhouse’s electorate team wanted her to replace him because he is such a good family man he doesn’t have time to campaign. I don’t disagree with Michael’s choices about being a good father, as it is very tough being a parent and a politician, but it does show how good Jo is.  Read more »

Who is Ian McDougall?

Regular readers will know this blog hates people cheating, rigging or behaving unethically in selection processes.

In Hunua something very, very dodgy has gone on, with the electorate chair Ian McDougall blackballing two very experienced local body politicians who have done a lot of work in the electorate so his favored candidate can win.

Like in Rodney this skullduggery needs to be exposed.

National can’t have one bitter old man deciding on who can be elected, and something needs to be done. I am starting by trying to get to the bottom of who Ian McDougall is, and the tipline has been running hot with stories about him.  Read more »

Labour hypocrisy over state servant candidates

It is never a good look when candidates for office appear in the news, but it is pretty scurrilous for Labour to be attacking Parmjeet Parmar when their own candidates are less than clean themselves. Rajen Prasad should also be very careful about going after people when I note Prasad himself must have campaigned for Labour while a commissioner – because he was named on Labour’s list very soon after he stood down.

I suspect there is a bit of Indian politics at play here, but Parmjeet doesn’t help herself when she talks to delegates claiming she has the support and is the preferred candidate for John Key and Peter Goodfellow. All that is going to happen now is some journalist is going to ask John Key if he supports Parmjeet and he is going, as he should, to say no. Selections are in the hands of the delegates not the plaything of the president of the party and the prime minister.

The Families Commission is facing scrutiny over political links, after one of its commissioners was photographed campaigning with Prime Minister John Key.

During a select committee hearing, Labour MP Dr Rajen Prasad held up a photograph of commissioner Dr Parmjeet Parmar wearing a National Party ribbon with Key at a recent Auckland event.

Prasad said he understood Parmar was planning to run as National Party candidate and asked chief commissioner Belinda Milne whether it was appropriate for a potential candidate to remain as a commissioner.

Milne said she had heard “rumours” of Parmar’s political involvement but she had no knowledge of any candidacy.

“There are all sorts of rumours going around about who is doing what,” she said.

“Until there is a firm situation … we can’t do anything.”

She said another staff member was intending to run as candidate for Labour, which he had declared to the commission. They had already discussed with him how to separate his political activities from his work.  Read more »

Do people like this have a place in politics?

A high-profile political figure has won the right to keep details of his divorce secret after a judge ruled he was a “vulnerable person”.

His messy divorce case included allegations of espionage, infidelity, dognapping, theft, the involvement of three Queen’s Counsel, and a disputed allegation the man grabbed or touched his wife’s neck, tried to kick in the door of their home and shouted abuse at her.

The couple were involved in a protracted legal battle through the Family Court. The ex-wife has sought the right to speak publicly and to her friends about the break-up, but the husband has fought to keep the dispute secret.

How can anyone be a high profile political figure and at the same time “vulnerable”.

If you enter politics, you get to make judgements about other people.  You get to influence policy.  You get to make decisions over the careers, lives and families.  This person, at the very least, should have no say or influence over many political policy areas.

But how can we make sure someone that kicks in the door and “grabbed or touched” his wife’s neck is kept well away?  Why the code of silence?

It seems to be an upside-down situation to have someone who has alleged involvement in espionage and theft in a high profile position in a political party be protected from public scrutiny and the public’s judgement as to this person’s suitability.   Read more »

What is Peter Goodfellow doing to get more women in Caucus?

National Party President Peter ‘Dopey’ Goodfellow was once sledged by Hekia Parata at a National meeting for saying they would bring more women into the National caucus. Hekia rightly asked how, as it was just after the last election when National ended up with fewer women than it had in the previous term.

Labour tied itself in knots over its man ban. National insiders say that National has been running women’s only sessions and promising women the earth if they will only run for National. The problem for National is that in electorates like Whangarei or Hunua the local delegates select the best person for the job, and if Peter Goodfellow tells them they have to have a woman they will tell him to bugger off.

The only real influence the National Party have over getting more women in parliament is through the list.    Read more »