Pheasant

Opening Weekend and the Benefits of Remington Nitro Pheasant

Isuzu-pheasants

The Dirty Politics crew after an early mornng hunt on Sunday

This past weekend was opening weekend and so I went to the Hawkes Bay to shoot upland game birds with a couple of mates and Simon Lusk.

It was brilliantly fine, so not much fun for the duck shooters, but we had four dogs and four mates and two Isuzu trucks (including my one, an Isuzu D-Max custom Maverick 13 Hunter from Southern Autos), a pile of ammo and some fun to be had.

On Saturday we chased quail and when that quietened down we went and bombed up pigeons under a bridge at dusk. huge swarms of them came into roost and we lit up. It was great fun.

On Sunday we went to a spot Simon said had pheasants and we nailed three.

One was flushed by Bruce quite a way out and went away in a straight line from us. Simon put up his Benelli loaded with Remington Nitro Pheasant an one shot later it was down and then retrieved by Bruce.

Simon said to me that shot right there was why he used Remington Nitro Pheasant, and coincidentally he had prepared a post about why he uses it.      Read more »

Processing Game Birds

Simon Lusk with Bruce, Mabo and Dave and his might Isuzu D-Max

Simon Lusk with Bruce, Mabo and Dave and his might Isuzu D-Max

by Simon Lusk

Game Birds can be tough. They spend most of their life on the move, unlike battery chickens, so have far denser and tougher meat than farm raised birds.

The single most important part of processing game birds is to allow them to rest and allow the proteins in the meat that make it tough break down. This will turn a tough bird into something far more palatable.

To overcome the toughness the simplest approach is to leave the birds in the fridge for at least two weeks before processing them. One week doesn’t seem to be enough, with birds still coming out of the oven tough. After two weeks you will notice a real change in the composition of the flesh. It will become softer to the touch.    Read more »

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Heavy v Light Shotguns

roosterhBy Simon Lusk

Getting the right gun for upland game hunting can be the difference between successful hunts and coming home without anything in your game bag.

There is a school of thought that lighter guns are better for upland hunting as they are easier to carry in the field and faster swinging so better for fast birds. I bought into this theory some years back, and bought a very light Fabarm Lion. I wanted a light semiautomatic for quail shooting, and especially covey flush shooting. The Fabarm was the lightest left hander I could get at the time. I basically could not hit anything with it, and the next season replaced it with a much heavier Remington 1100.

The Remington is a big heavy gun that suits my shooting style perfectly. It is so good that I can make shots without having good footing, and I can shoot off balance and still expect to bring birds down. I am six foot two and two hundred and ten pounds. I started shooting really, really well, which was more to do with the gun than my shooting ability.   Read more »

A not so cunning rooster

It is a pity that game bird season is over because this rooster turned up this morning and has ben crowing since the crack of dawn.

He is pretty tame, if a little aggressive and so a quick grab and twist of the neck might be in order…at least to stop him crowing.

CAM SLATER/ Whale Oil Beef Hooked

CAM SLATER/ Whale Oil Beef Hooked

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Wednesday Weapons – Lock and Load

It is game bird season. Tomorrow I am off shooting. Here is the selection of ammunition that will be expended on Rabbits, Possums, Hares, Deer, Ducks, Pheasants and Quail over the next 5 days.

All ammunition was supplied by Hamills Manukau, the best shooting sports store in Auckland.

 

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