Phil Goff

Has the NZ Herald never heard of Jenny Shipley?

The NZ Herald had a piece yesterday about all of Labour leaders in the past 6 years.

I thought the piece might be interesting until I saw the first line.

2008

11 November: Resignation of Helen Clark, after serving three consecutive terms since being elected as New Zealand’s first woman Prime Minister in 1999.

If they can’t get basic facts right in the first line then that doesn’t hold much confidence for the accuracy of the rest of the article.

Jenny Shipley was New Zealands first woman Prime Minister and no amount of re-writing history or weasel words can take that away from her. Oh sure the media and their pals in Labour like to say Helen Clark was the first “elected” Prime Minister but that is just pathetic semantics. We don’t elect our Prime Ministers in New Zealand, we never have and never will. There is no separate ballot for Prime Minister.

The rest of the article looks at the lengthening list of Labour’s failed leaders from Clark to Cunliffe, all slain in battle by Phil Goff, with the only exception being David Shearer, who nicked himself to death before finally falling on his dropped sword.

On present performance and the fact that Labour’s talent pool is as shallow as a car-park puddle expect the list of lonesome losers to grow.

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Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Things are pretty bad for Cunliffe & Labour when Brian Rudman attacks

Brian Rudman usually saves his columns in the Herald to call for subsidies for the arts or the building and/or restoration of his favourite theatre.

A dyed int he wool cloth cap socialist spending his last days in print typing away interviewing his keyboard he sometimes comes up with a ripper.

Yesterday he excoriated David Cunliffe and Labour:

Late Saturday night, while Labour Party workers were still cleaning up the blood from the worst electoral thrashing the party had received since 1922, leader David Cunliffe was busy on his computer trying to save his skin. In a mass mailing to members and supporters he said, “Let’s congratulate ourselves” on “a campaign well-fought” and declared his intention to stay on as leader.

Just how he can declare himself “immensely proud” of a campaign that resulted in Labour receiving 22,353 fewer election night votes than in 2011 against a two-term National Government is a mystery. Only measured against the 2011 election night calamity when Labour lost 165,000 votes on its 2008 result, does Saturday’s result start to look less than a total disaster.

After the 2008 debacle, leader Phil Goff immediately fell on his sword, to be replaced first by David Shearer, and then when he was judged to be under-performing, by Cunliffe. Now it’s Cunliffe’s turn. His departure seems inevitable.

It was a disaster. Nowhere int eh world, generally, does a government win a third term on an increased vote, and certainly not ever before under the mMP system, let alone majority. The scale of the disaster for the left has yet to be realised.

It took National two election to recover from Bill English’s disastrous 2002 election campaign. I suspect it will take Labour much longer. Especially as their fool leader won’t quit.

Whether kicking and screaming or gracefully is over to him. The problem for Labour is, who next? The retread, David Shearer; the steady back room policy wonk, David Parker; or the new generation team of Grant Robertson and Jacinda Ardern?

Labour’s challenge is not just solving its leadership problems. It also has to decide whether it wants, in two years’ time, to celebrate its 100th birthday celebrations as the generally accepted, centre-left “broad church” alternative to the National Party. Under MMP, this is no longer a given. Since the election, both Green co-leader Russel Norman and New Zealand First’s Winston Peters have made claims to the leadership of the Opposition. A try-on for sure, but with Labour stuck in its present doldrums, is it any wonder the mice are playing?

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SIS inquiry results to be public

via ODT

via ODT

Felix Marwick at Newstalk ZB reports

The Prime Minister is promising findings from an inquiry into the SIS’s release of information to blogger Cameron Slater will be made public.

The law governing the inquiry being run by the Inspector General of Intelligence and Security states it’s findings can only be released with the consent of its minister – in this case John Key.

He says details will be forthcoming. Read more »

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Labour’s leadership battle will look like 300

300-soldier-blood

Labour’s leadership battle is shaping up to be an epic re-run of the battle scenes in 300.

Blood and guts everywhere.

It’s going to be awesome.

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Good call by Shearer, let’s see the numbers

David Shearer has made a good call, for Labour and David Cunliffe to release the internal polling numbers to caucus so they can see what the truth of the campaign looks like.

The party leader, David Cunliffe, meets the Labour caucus at Parliament today, three days after delivering the party’s worst election result for 90 years in which Labour pulled in just 24.7 percent of the party vote.

Mr Cunliffe said he would he will ask the caucus to trigger a leadership primary as he wants to refresh his mandate.

David Shearer told Radio New Zealand’s Morning Report programme a leadership race now would be a distraction and a forensic analysis of the election campaign was needed first.

“We need to know behind the scenes what our polling suggested, where our vote went,” Mr Shearer said. An independent review should be carried out by someone independent and not active in the party at present.    Read more »

Cunliffe is tits at fundraising

On election night and the day after Labour’s worst election result in more than 80 years David Cunliffe claimed that Labour has no money.

He was using that as an excuse for the loss.

What Cunliffe forgot is that the people most responsible for fundraising are firstly the leader. If people don’t like you then raising money is doubly hard. As we have seen 75% of the voting population decided to cast their votes elsewhere and that is due in a large part to the unlikeability of David Cunliffe.

Secondly the President and General Secretary are also responsible. My Labour sources, both inside Fraser House and in the wider party tell me that fundraising efforts were vetoed or blocked by Tim Barnett and/or Moira Coatsworth. At the same time they refused to fundraise themselves, thinking it was beneath them.

David Cunliffe has been dead set useless as Labour leader. He has managed to tank Labour’s vote to an undeniably bad level.

One of the worst parts of Cunliffe’s leadership, just as it was with Phil Goff and David Shearer’s leadership, is their inability to raise money.

Instead of working their guts out like Don Brash did to rebuild National’s war chest Cunliffe blames everyone else.  Read more »

I wonder if Phil Goff told the Inquiry why he lied?

Phil Goff appeared before the same inquiry that I will appear before on Thursday.

Back in 2011 I asked a simple OIA request, as I am entitled to by law, every citizen has this right. The SIS responded but not before Phil Goff delayed the request.

What is worse I ask you? The fact that I followed the law and received and OIA response…or the fact that Phil Goff attempted to delay or prevent the release because it was embarrassing for him.

Malcolm Harbrow at No Right Turn explains.

Phil Goff was interviewed by the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security today, and in the process admitted on oath to unlawfully delaying an OIA request:

When I spoke to the Director of the SIS who phoned me suggesting he intended to release the documents immediately, he was coy about whether he knew of the identity of the Mr Slater who had requested the documents sought under the OIA. He then acknowledged that he did know who Cameron Slater was. The documents were to be released immediately until I challenged why the SIS was acting in the way he proposed. He at that point suggested he would delay the release for a number of days.    Read more »

Hands up who wants to trust an “expert panel”?

David Cunliffe says that Labour will make sure there is an “expert panel” who will determine whether or not the house you are selling is your residence, before applying the capital gains tax.

Key said National would release its fiscal plan next week but reiterated any tax cuts would be modest and aimed at low and middle income earners.

He hammered the point that Labour would add five new taxes and tried to reprise the “show me the money” moment from his 2011 debate against Phil Goff asking Cunliffe if his capital gains tax would apply to houses in trusts.

But Cunliffe avoided answering, turning the topic instead to Labour’s broader tax plan. His advisers told media in the break that the tax would not apply to the family home if it was in a trust.

Speaking to media after the debate, Key clarified his attack on Cunliffe regarding Capital Gains Tax applying to family homes that were owned by a trust.

“My read of the [Labour policy] is that if you own a family home and it’s in a trust, under Labour you will be subject to a capital gains tax because that policy says that you don’t pay a capital gains tax on a family home… if you are the owner/occupier. 

“But, of course under a family trust the trust is the owner.

Key said he’d received a “ball park” figure from an unnamed tax specialist that 300,000 Kiwi homes were in trusts.   Read more »

Journalists whine about delays with OIAs and now they are whining about quick turnaround

Journalists always whine about the turn around time for Official Information Act requests.

They complain that the ministers treat the 20days as stipulated by law as a goal and a delaying tactics.

And yet when a minister who has information to hand and no reason to delay it they now whine it was a quick turn around.

Spare me, these pricks are so slippery when it comes to news.

Judith Collins’ office processed an Official Information Act request in just two days to release an email embarrassing then Serious Fraud Office head Adam Feeley in 2011.

The revelation comes as ripples from the Dirty Politics saga widened during the weekend after a series of bombshells including:

â–  Collins stepped down as Justice Minister after an email handed to the prime minister’s office raised questions about her involvement in what leaked emails appear to suggest was a campaign by Right-wing blogger Cameron Slater and others to undermine Feeley while he was SFO boss.

â–  Prime Minister John Key confirmed there would be an inquiry into Collins’s actions in relation to Feeley, with details of the inquiry to be announced today.

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