Photo of the Day

Photo Of The Day

Hetty Green: She was known as “the richest woman in America” or “the richest woman in the world.” Therein lay the real reason a lot of men thought she was a witch.

Hetty Green: She was known as “the richest woman in America” or “the richest woman in the world.” Therein lay the real reason a lot of men thought she was a witch.

“Witch of Wall Street”

The press called her “The Witch of Wall Street.” The basis for the name was her irascibility and her personal hygiene. She stunk. In summertime the odour would be so foul that people working in the same bank office where she kept a desk would scheme to stay as far away from her as possible. Her long black dresses, decades out of style, would turn green and ragged from wear and filth. Her fingernails were crusty dirty. She went around for 20 years beleaguered by a painful hernia before she finally had to see the doctor. She was outraged by his fee for surgery ($150 – this was a century ago), but so desperate that she agreed. And later she tried to stiff the doctor, as was her way whenever it came to paying for anybody’s services.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Sirius Documentary

Photo: Sirius Documentary

Ata

According to a report published in the newspaper La Estrella de Arica in  2003, “it all started on a winter morning when a local man from the pampa, Oscar Munoz, was following his hobby of collecting tokens, bottles and other objects of historical value in the ghost towns from the nitrate era.” Munoz went specifically to a ghost town called La Noria, located 56 KM to the interior of the provincial capital of Iquique.

As Munoz dug in the area around La Noria’s abandoned church, he came across a white cloth tied by a violet ribbon, finding inside “a strange skeleton no bigger than 15 cm [the size of a pen]. It was a creature with hard teeth, a bulging head with an additional odd bulge on top. Its body was scaly and of dark colour. Unlike humans, it had ten ribs,”  stated the article.

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Photo Of The Day

Image source: The Australian

Image source: The Australian

The Prime Minister who Disappeared

In 1967, Harold Holt went for a swim off an Australian beach and never came back. By law, no official inquest could be held without a body. Soon the whispers of conspiracy began.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo © Luis Marden/National Geographic Creative/Corbis. October 1939, El Paso, Texas, USA --- Two border patrol officers attempt to keep a fugitive in the US ---

Photo © Luis Marden/National Geographic Creative/Corbis.
October 1939, El Paso, Texas, USA — Two border patrol officers attempt to keep a fugitive in the US —

Ok Guys, Looks Like We Gonna

Have To Cut Him In Half….

 

I was searching for information about this photo wondering if it was real or staged…

And on my travels found the following blurb…

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: International Revolving Door Company. Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco.

Photo: International Revolving Door Company.
Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco.

In the late 1800s, Theophilus van Kannel supposedly designed a revolving door because he hated chivalry. He didn’t like to parry with other men over who should enter or exit a door first. Even worse, he hated to open doors for women. As early skyscrapers were built in US cities near the turn of the 20th century, revolving doors became important for internal temperature control. However, although a social phobia may have spurred van Kannel to design revolving doors, phobias, such as claustrophobia, may also keep people from using them.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Charles Hoff, Ed Jackson/New York Daily News.

Photo: Charles Hoff, Ed Jackson/New York Daily News.

The Fascinating Story of

Collyers’ Mansion

In New York City, and along much of the East Coast, a dwelling jammed rafter-high with junk is referred to by rescue personnel, with dismay and no small degree of respect, as a “Collyers’ Mansion”. As in, primary searches delayed because of Collyers’ Mansion conditions.

The phrase, as many New York history buffs know, refers to the legendary booby-trapped brownstone in Harlem in which the brothers Homer and Langley Collyer were found dead in 1947 amid more than 140 tons of stockpiled possessions, including stacks of phone books, newspapers, tin cans, clocks and a fake two-headed baby in formaldehyde.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Margaret Bourke-White—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images. Coca-Cola signs at a roadside store marked "For Colored," 1938.

Photo: Margaret Bourke-White—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images.
Coca-Cola signs at a roadside store marked “For Colored,” 1938.

Coca-cola Removed Cocaine from

Its Secret Formula

In 1899, Coca-Cola became available in bottles as well as soda fountains, which means that there was a shift in consumer demographics. Explains The Atlantic, “Minorities who couldn’t get into the segregated soda fountains suddenly had access to it.” It’s suggested in a New York Times article that the removal of cocaine from the formula was sparked by racial tensions: “Southern newspapers reported that “negro cocaine fiends” were raping white women, the police powerless to stop them. By 1903, [then-manager of Coca-Cola Asa Griggs] Candler had bowed to white fears (and a wave of anti-narcotics legislation), removing the cocaine and adding more sugar and caffeine.”

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Photo Of The Day

This isn't a photograph of the actual Mordake. Instead, it's a photo of a wax replica created by an artist to show what Mordake might have looked like.

This isn’t a photograph of the actual Mordake. Instead, it’s a photo of a wax replica created by an artist to show what Mordake might have looked like.

Edward Mordake

Edward Mordake (sometimes spelled Mordrake) was, so the story goes, heir to an English peerage, but this inheritance brought him no comfort because he was cursed with a terrible deformity — a second face on the back of his head. This “devil twin” possessed a kind of hateful intelligence. It never slept but instead whispered constantly of “such things as they only speak of in hell.” Driven mad by this demon companion, Mordake committed suicide at the age of 23, leaving behind instructions that the demon face should be destroyed before his burial, “lest it continues its dreadful whisperings in my grave.”

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Phillip Toledano

Photo: Phillip Toledano

Days with My Father                                   

“My father is very funny. …

I put these little cookies on his chest and he said- look at my tittties!

How can you not laugh?”

In a series of intimate portraits taken over three years, Phillip Toledano recorded the final chapter in his father’s long life – his sense of humour, his struggle with memory loss and above all his unfailing spirit. This body of work about his father is caring and compelling. His writing adds insight and a quiet contemplation.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: John and Jackie Knill, Courtesy of Knill family.

Photo: John and Jackie Knill, Courtesy of Knill family.

 Last Shot On The Memory Card

On December 31, 2004, the body of John Knill was found; and on January 13, 2005, the body of Jackie Knill was discovered at a Thailand beach resort. They were two of the many victims killed from the December 26, 2004 tsunami. Weeks later, a Seattle man doing relief work found a damaged camera and discarded it but kept the memory card in the camera. After downloading the images he discovered pictures of the Knills enjoying their vacation, as well as shots of a huge wave approaching the shore. With each picture it shows the wave getting closer and closer to shore. The last picture taken of them before the wave hit (shown above) was shot just after 8.30 am on December 26.

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