Political corruption

Why is it that Dotcom is always about kickbacks?

Kim Dotcom announced, sort of, two policies yesterday.

Not that he would answer any questions about them, like importantly where he will fund these policies from.

But one caught my eye…his policy of providing “kickbacks” for purchasing things online.

Dotcom is not waiting around, today revealing two policies.

“We want to give the citizens of New Zealand a benefit, a financial kickback, if they buy stuff online,” he said.

Isn’t this how he got himself in the trouble in the first place? …now he is trying to expand his policies of kickbacks…or bribes in legal parlance to a whole country?

Why is it that Kim Dotcom is all about bribery, corruption, kickbacks and graft?  Read more »

Union ratbags threatening whistleblowers in corruption investigation

As Australia union corruption inquiry rumbles into life union ratbags are threatening whistleblowers and meeting to prepare evidence so they all sing from the same songsheet.

Even when under investigation their corruption continues.

Building union corruption whistleblowers have been threatened and warned not to co-operate with investigations into alleged criminal activity as the federal government prepares to launch a national police taskforce to examine the construction sector.

Fairfax Media can also reveal that corruption suspects have been meeting to plan their responses to the Abbott government’s royal commission into unions, raising concerns evidence has been destroyed and false stories agreed upon in a bid to stymie investigators.

Four prominent construction companies in NSW and Victoria have also launched internal investigations after Fairfax Media recently revealed links between their operations, underworld figures and allegedly corrupt officials in the Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union.  Read more »

Laws for sale

The Greens and Labour ran a full on campaign saying that ‘Gambling Laws Are Not For Sale’ when the Government scored Auckland a free convention centre.

It came complete with allegations of corruption, and multiple questions in Parliament.

But unlike the Government doing something for Auckland, the Greens have been caught pants down acting in political self-interest by doing some kind of dodgy backroom deal with German fraudster Kim Dotcom.  Read more »

Dodgy Greek Ratbag can’t remember all the people he has taken bribes from as there are so many

We think we have it bad with a Mayor who uses his office to entertain his testicles. He used his position for a few freebie hotel rooms…hardly the graft of legends, but graft nonetheless.

Spare a thought for the Greeks and the ratbags they have governing them. They make Len Brown look like a shamateur with their graft.

When Antonis Kantas, a deputy in the Defense Ministry here, spoke up against the purchase of expensive German-made tanks in 2001, a representative of the tank’s manufacturer stopped by his office to leave a satchel on his sofa. It contained 600,000 euros, about $814,000. Other arms manufacturers eager to make deals came by, too, some guiding him through the ins and outs of international banking and then paying him off with deposits to his overseas accounts.

At the time, Mr. Kantas, a wiry former military officer, did not actually have the authority to decide much of anything on his own. But corruption was so rampant inside the Greek equivalent of the Pentagon that even a man of his relatively modecst rank, he testified recently, was able to amass nearly $19 million in just five years on the job.  Read more »

Waikato Times Editorial on Corruption

While convicted blackmailer, fraudster and serial litigant Graham McCready continues to cut a swathe through our judicial processes it should be noted that more and more politicians are breaking the law, especially electoral law.

While I cannot condone McCready’s use of the court for his own style of bullying there are many other who do the same thing, pretending to be litigants in person but costing their victims thousands.

With the failure of the Police though to action complaints against politicians it is time for something more robust that private prosecutions. In Australia we are witnessing what happens when regulators like the Independent Commission Against Corruption actually do what out Police have singularly failed to do you have to wonder why we don’t have such a body too.

The Waikato Times thinks the same.

Some legal experts have explained their doubts that Mr McCready will succeed in getting a private prosecution against Mr Brown. They say he will need witnesses to allege a link between the free hotel rooms at Sky and his support for SkyCity’s conference centre bid. Without that, there is no proof.  Read more »

Corrupt, dodgy ALP ratbag set to have his millions reefed back

Eddie Obeid the ALPs virtual mafia don is set to have a good chunk of his ill-gotten millions reefed back by the NSW government.

The state government is set to pass extraordinary laws to strip corrupt former Labor minister Eddie Obeid and his family of at least $30 million in profits from a coal deal at the centre of a historic corruption probe.

A day after Premier Barry O’Farrell announced the government would pass special laws to tear up three corruption-tainted coal exploration licences, Mr O’Farrell said it was also working on laws to confiscate the proceeds of corrupt activity by former Labor figures and businessmen.

He said on Tuesday the laws to cancel the licences would be introduced in state Parliament next week, while additional laws to claw back proceeds of corrupt coal ventures from Mr Obeid and others were still
in development.

“I’m told that it will take a little bit longer,” Mr O’Farrell said.

One way to fight corruption

The old saying goes that sunlight is the best disinfectant when it comes to corruption…well the next logical step would be a tour surely?

Like many of his law-abiding compatriots, Petr Sourek resents how corruption rewards cheating and is a drag on economic growth. But unlike others he decided to try and profit—legally—from the Czech Republic’s sleazy intersection of business and politics.

In 2011 he created Corrupt Tour, a company that offers a series of sightseeing tours that highlight, and mock, some of Prague’s most outrageous corruption scandals in the post-communist era.

“We wanted to reverse the usual order of things,” he says. “Corruption basically feeds on business so we decided to start a business that feeds on corruption.”

The 38-year-old Sourek studied philosophy and the classics (Latin and Greek) at university. Something of a dabbler, he ticks off a litany of work—freelance writer, lecturer, translator and art director among them.  Read more »

Another angry reader emails

There are so many I am only picking the best now.

corrution a

Elected local government officials have a sworn duty to protect not only our democracy, but also the framework of that very process that achieves democracy, transparency and accountability.  The process & framework are there to ensure no one is enabled, or is capable of perverting the very “rules/laws/code of conduct/ethics/framework” for their own personal, corrupted benefit.

Subverting and “gaming” bureaucratic frameworks and processes, checks and balances that then allows & encourages further tenure & questionable behaviors from the dodgy individual – and all with unchecked productivity/spending from the same dodgy person – can only translate to hopelessly compromised Councillors also, or some might say, political corruption.

And in years past, that “further enabling” by compromised Councillors, who chose not to stop the enabling of a corrupt official, would be seen as political corruption and even treason upon the Nation.    Read more »

Cunliffe referred to Police

After gobbing off in parliament today along with Russel Norman about pending court action for John Banks David Cunliffe has ended up with egg on his face.

Read more »

No corruption in NZ? Of course there is

People think New Zealand has no corruption. Of course there is, and here is why…little or no penalties.

A private eye who has helped two clients lay bribery charges under the Secret Commissions Act in the past month says the penalties need updating as they haven’t changed in more than a 100 years.

Danny Toreson of Thompson and Toreson Investigations would not name the clients, but said: “One is a commercial organisation and the other is a government body”.

The Secret Commissions Act is the main law outlawing staff taking backhanders for awarding work and contracts without their employer’s knowledge. For example, a government worker could give a contract to a company in return for a secret payment or benefit.  Read more »