Politics of New Zealand

Do we really still need the Maori seats?

The Maori seats are becoming a bit of a joke.

They have the lowest voter turnout, were supposed to be temporary and now after the last election seemingly irrelevant when 19 Maori were elected in general seats.

About the only use I can find for Maori seats is that it parks a whole bunch of Labour votes that might make the difference in general seats like Bay of Plenty, Rotorua and East Cape and sequesters them in irrelevance.

Parliament now has more Maori MPs than ever before, prompting one commentator to question whether Maori seats were still needed.

Nineteen Maori MPs have been elected in general electorates and on party lists. Once the seven Maori seats are included, the total number of MPs who identify as Maori is 26 – up from 21 in 2011.

This means one in five MPs in the new Parliament were Maori, compared to one in seven in the general population.

The National Party’s caucus is 15 per cent Maori, including two MPs likely to be given high-ranking portfolios – Paula Bennett and Hekia Parata.

The growing proportion of Maori in Parliament was met with mixed responses from Maori leaders.  Read more »

And the criticism still mounts…

The Nation was brutal this morning.

This is what Jim Anderton had to say about Labour’s party vote campaign strategy.

Lisa Owen: We saw Mana, Mt Albert, Christchurch there, where the party vote was seriously eroded. What do you think went wrong there on the ground? What was wrong?

Jim Anderton: Well, there’s two serious points you haven’t mentioned — one is that 13 of the Labour electorates got less than 15% of the party vote, and in the strong Labour electorates, mostly the Labour vote went down in the party vote. In truth, we had more people not on the roll or not voting than the entire vote that the National party vote got or the entire vote of all the parties opposing National. Now, that’s a very worrying trend for the first time. And the worrying thing for Labour is that this isn’t the worst result that’s ever been had. I mean, the National party had a worse result in 2002; they got 22% of the vote, but in the three years following that, they caught up and nearly beat the Labour party in 2005, and in the three years since 2011, when the result was not good for Labour, they’ve done even worse. So this is really a very major problem to face.

Lisa Owen: It took them two terms to come back, and we’ll talk more about that later, but I’m interested in what your thoughts are and why these people didn’t come out and vote. Why couldn’t they be bothered?

Jim Anderton: Well, I think the Labour party are very wise to have put a stamp on having a very careful root-and-branch review of what actually happened, and I’ll give you one example — 10 months ago, a young Cook Island girl, if she wouldn’t mind me calling her a girl, probably woman, from Auckland came to Christchurch and thrashed the National party in Christchurch East, thrashed. They got a hiding to nothing. And over 60% of the vote; she actually polled more votes than a very well-respected long-time member, Lianne Dalziel. Now, how come 10 months later, in the whole of Christchurch, the vote in Christchurch was lower than the national average? Now, that’s a very serious question to answer. I have one idea about it, and that’s organisation. I was a campaign manager for that by-election, and I said to Labour, ‘The reason that we’re doing well here is that we’re highly organised. We’ve focused on the policy.’ And I agree with Helen about reflecting to people what they really need and what their aspirations are and working out specific policies that meet those needs. Now, that’s exactly what we did in Christchurch East, and I don’t think that was done in this election.

Lisa Owen: I just want to do a round robin here.

Jim Anderton: And one of the reasons for that is that Labour no longer has the mass membership of a party that can accomplish that. It can do it in one by-election, but you can’t do it across the country, and that’s the lesson from this election.

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Face of the day

Grant Robertson with cute baby.

Grant Robertson with cute baby.

It’s now game on, with Grant Robertson confirming he’ll also contest the leadership – after several days of speculation.

“I think I have something to offer the Labour Party to reconnect with New Zealanders and for New Zealanders to see Labour as part of their future.

Grant Robertson says he believes the wider party will get behind him.

At the last leadership contest a year ago, Mr Robertson was the caucus favourite – but David Cunliffe won with the backing of party members and unions.

-Newtalkzb

 

Come back Shane Jones, all is forgiven LOL

Face of the day

Hone Harawira

Hone Harawira

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What Will Winston Do?

Winston-Peters-NZH

The outcome of this election has always looked most likely to involve Winston Peters having the balance of power. It still looks that way, although Colin Craig may end up sneaking into parliament which would mean John Key could play the mad off against the bad.

If Colin Craig doesn’t make it into parliament Winston could hold all the cards. He can go with Labour and shaft John Key and the Greens. He could go with National and shaft Labour and the Greens. He’d get a vote of thanks from the country for shafting the Greens whatever way he goes.    Read more »

What 22.4% means for Labour

-3News

-3News

Labour polled at 22.4% in the Fairfax poll yesterday.

This has some pretty major implications for Labour.

The biggest implication is they may lose all their list MPs, depending on how many electorates they win.

There could be an overhang as Labour wins more electorates than it deserves seats. So no more Parker, Ardern, Cosgrove, Moroney, Little or Street.    Read more »

Face of the day

Colin Craig

Colin Craig

According to the latest poll Mr Craig has good reason to celebrate. I know Cam says better the Bad ( Winston ) than the Mad ( Colin ) but on an emotional level I prefer Mr Craig. Winston burnt his bridges with me when he lied about my favourite politician Judith Collins. I hope Colin ends up the King maker simply because I despise Winston.

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What does Vote Positive mean?

Serious political watchers have been wondering what the hell Labour’s Vote Positive slogan means.

It basically means nothing at all and does little to motivate voters to vote for them. It is very unconventional as a slogan.

Vote Positive could be put down to Labour being dead set useless and coming up with a seriously dud slogan. 

Vote Positive only makes sense if it is linked to a negative campaign like Dirty Politics. Then it goes from being a dud slogan to something that makes sense.  Read more »

Good to see some journalists know their job

Heather du Plessis-Allan has been fact checking the politicians…on both sides.

After the election debate she looked at the claims of both leaders.

John Key got the unemployment one wrong but then it also depends how you interpret the statistics.

What is interesting is the first one where David Cunliffe claims over a million hectares of our land has been approved for foreign sale under the National Government.

I like the diagram Heather drew showing how much land has actually been approved for foreign sale. It was one quarter of what he claimed.

image001 Read more »

Face of the day

via TVNZ / Laila Harre

via TVNZ / Laila Harre

How low can Mr Dotcom’s hired party leader, Laila Harre go?

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