Polynesia

The little racist joke that wasn’t at TVNZ

TVNZ got all precious when Regan Cunliffe at Throng busted their chops over an off colour joke by Andy Shaw.

They hunkered down and excused the racist attitudes of their bosses all the while hoping that no one wold notice their hypocrisy at the way they treated Paul Henry.

They hoped it would all blow over.

It hasn’t.

Labour MP for Mangare, Su’a William Sio has started a campaign to stop the racism at TVNZ after the comments Andrew Shaw made at the 2014 new season launch last week.

Sio wrote on Facebook:

When you have as this article points out, “A senior TVNZ executive has labelled Auckland a s*#@ hole while joking about the city’s large Polynesian population” my blood boils. I find it offensive to have a Senior Executive of a taxpayer funded Television station reflect this attitude, as I suspect it reflects an institutional racism that lurks beneath the skin of this so called Senior Executive who found an audience to reveal it to. Were the audience laughing in embarrassment, or was it a pakeha dominated senior executive audience? In this day and age, to joke about Polynesian as if to promote a negative stereotypical attitude again I find it offensive as it reveals something about this kind of NZer.  Read more »

David Rankin reckons that Maori are not the indigenous people of NZ

Maybe David Rankin is on to something here, if he is, can Maori please refund all money they have claimed under the treaty, as its obviously the proceeds of crime, given that it was received for the land they claimed they owned, but probably stolen from previous occupants…..

The status of Maori as the country’s indigenous population could be in danger if research, which suggests previous civilisations lived in New Zealand before Maori arrived, is proved true.

Ngapuhi leader David Rankin said books by authors such as investigative journalist Ian Wishart and historian Noel Hilliam presented “clear evidence” that some of New Zealand’s earliest residents might have arrived before the Polynesians.

He pointed to numerous Maori oral histories which referred to people being here when the first Maori arrived, including fair-skinned people.

“If we believe our histories, then we as Maori are not the indigenous people of New Zealand.”

The archaeological evidence in some research was a potential challenge to the status of Maori as indigenous, which was why he believed no other Maori was prepared to speak publicly on the issue, Mr Rankin said.

Details of much of the country’s past was being concealed by academic historians, he said.

“I would say it’s a conspiracy. They are worried that their own research will be exposed so they have worked hard to ridicule and suppress any Maori history which disagrees with their views.

“However, the tide is turning and more people are now seeing that there is a whole history of our country that has been concealed and which will have major implications for Treaty settlements for example.”

Lucky Kris was there

Three boys in an aluminium dinghy drifted 1300 kilometres across the South Pacific, resorting to drinking seawater and devouring a seagull to survive.

On Wednesday, a New Zealand fishing boat in a lonely part of the ocean spotted the tiny boat carrying the three Tokelauans who were thought lost forever.

They had eaten just one seagull in 50 days adrift.

“We got to them in a miracle,” first mate Tai Fredricsen of the Bay of Islands said from the Sanford tuna boat San Nikunau yesterday as it headed to Fiji with its extra cargo.

The boys, Samuel Perez and Filo Filo, both 15, and Edward Nasau, 14, had disappeared from Atafu Island on October 5. An extensive search by a RNZAF Orion failed to find any trace of them.

All I can say is that they were lucky fellow Tokelauan Kris Fa’afoi was there to help rescue them. I bet they are looking forward to a feed of McDonalds.

Kris Fa'afoi at the rescue of 3 Tokelauans