poverty

Public Service Announcement: Help sponsor a KidsCan child

A first-hand account of what it’s really like for families living in hardship in New Zealand as they send their kids back to school.

KidsCan visited the Waikato with Tristram Clayton and saw Kihikihi School, which is waiting for their support. Mum, Renee Hei Hei, and School Principal, Andy Morgan, talked about the challenges of hungry tummies and making a little money stretch a long way for their kids. They also visited a current KidsCan partner school, Waihi Central School, and spoke with the principal about how KidsCan is helping the school and their kids focus on the important stuff – their education.   Read more »

Tagged:

Where are all the benefit babies born?

Lindsay Mitchell has been doing some research on where all the benefit babies are being born.

Unsurprisingly bludgers beget bludgers…and it’s growing.

Every year I track how many benefit babies there are relative to the total births. Being a ‘benefit baby’ means relying on a parent or caregiver’s benefit  by the the end of their birth year. Most will become reliant nearer to their birth date rather than first birthday. Many will go on to experience long-term deprivation.

This year I asked for a  breakdown by Work and Income Service Centre. That was provided. Then I asked the Ministry of Health for District Health Board birth data for 2015. They very quickly obliged without an OIA. Credit to them.

It was then straight forward to place each service centre in a DHB  and calculate the percentage of babies in each district that would be benefit-dependent before their first birthday.

Where the benefit babies are born

Read more »

Public Service Announcement: Sponsor a kid with KidsCan

A first-hand account of what it’s really like for families living in hardship in New Zealand as they send their kids back to school.

KidsCan visited the Waikato with Tristram Clayton and saw Kihikihi School, which is waiting for their support. Mum, Renee Hei Hei, and School Principal, Andy Morgan, talked about the challenges of hungry tummies and making a little money stretch a long way for their kids. They also visited a current KidsCan partner school, Waihi Central School, and spoke with the principal about how KidsCan is helping the school and their kids focus on the important stuff – their education.   Read more »

Tagged:

What a surprise: tresspass notices don’t work on beggars

95f50c5f-d936-4dd9-8e9c-6e791f94ed21

Beggar with a smart phone on Queen Street, Auckland

Wonders will never cease, trespass notices are being ignored by beggars.

Trespass notices are not enough to keep beggars from hassling Asians in Auckland for money and cigarettes, a business owner says.

Last Thursday, the Herald reported that five rough-sleepers had harassed customers in Esquires Cafe on Courthouse Lane.

One became unruly after being asked to leave. Police arrested him, and he was later given a trespass notice banning him from the premises.

On Friday, police were again called to the cafe after three men and two women hassled Asian diners there.

The beggars were all given trespass notices.

The cafe owner, who wanted to be known only as Ms Li, said those who were trespassed were banned from entering Esquires, but that did not stop them loitering around the outdoor seating area where smoking customers were, because it was outside the cafe.   Read more »

Tagged:

Public Service Announcement: Sponsor a kid with KidsCan

A first-hand account of what it’s really like for families living in hardship in New Zealand as they send their kids back to school.

KidsCan visited the Waikato with Tristram Clayton and saw Kihikihi School, which is waiting for their support. Mum, Renee Hei Hei, and School Principal, Andy Morgan, talked about the challenges of hungry tummies and making a little money stretch a long way for their kids. They also visited a current KidsCan partner school, Waihi Central School, and spoke with the principal about how KidsCan is helping the school and their kids focus on the important stuff – their education.   Read more »

Tagged:

Oxfam’s annual squeal about rich pricks

Every January Oxfam declare war on the wealthy and the left-wing, and their able helpers in the Media Party, set about repeating their spurious claims.

The bottom line though, is that capitalism, not Oxfam, has contributed more to defeating poverty. The Telegraph editorial points out why.

Every year it is the same story: in early January, Oxfam releases a report stating that a handful of people are, collectively, as wealthy as the planet’s poorest 50 per cent. Only the number of this gilded elite changes. In 2010 it was the richest 388 who possessed the same as all those benighted billions at the bottom. By last year that had fallen to 80. Now, Oxfam informs us with appalled incredulity, the figure is 62.

One may ask why the charity, which is committed to reducing poverty, is so interested in billionaires. Surely it is the fate of those living on next to nothing that it should be concerned with, not playboys with fleets of superyachts and private jets. Unfortunately, that would present a problem: for when Oxfam concentrates on statistics not politics, it concedes that “extreme poverty has halved in just 15 years”.

The reality is that Oxfam is not campaigning against poverty any more. It is campaigning against wealth, as if the global economy were a zero sum game, with a finite amount of cash to be divided among the citizens of the Earth. Yet that is patently not true. Capitalism generates wealth. Currently its fruits are lifting people out of extreme poverty at unprecedented rates. To everybody but Oxfam, this represents extremely good news. The charity, however, gives the impression that it would be happier if everyone were poorer, as long as we were all equally poor.

Oxfam’s annual report is designed to make us all blush. We are supposed to feel ashamed that we can live in a world of such manifest, astonishing inequality. But it is outcomes that matter, not equality. To pretend otherwise really is shameless.

Read more »

Tagged:

It’s a scandal! Man holds same views for ten years. Outrage!

The NZ Herald has attacked Jamie Whyte for the apparent crime of being self-plagiarising. How does that even become a problem?

You can’t plagiarise yourself.

You really do have to wonder at the sanctimony of a newspaper who has been running repeat articles all holidays moaning like a whore that hasn’t been paid about someone who it seems holds the same views he held ten years ago.

What’s worse? Jamie Whyte holding the same views he did 10 years ago, or the Herald going all in on a misleading story from a drunk slapper who claimed she’d been hit because she spoke Te Reo?

Think about the outrage here for a moment. If a politician changes his views 10 years later he’s a screaming hypocrite, but if he espouses the same views ten years later he’s a self-plagiarist?

Our readers are onto it.

Metalinwood says:

What rubbish by the herald. They often pull out articles that have already been published and republish them again a year later. What is the difference?

Or when they take an article from a british newspaper and it looks like it was written locally because its not clear where it came from other than the author that you would have to look up to know?

How many political articles by John Armstrong over the years are the same thing, self plagiarism? Plenty. Amazed to hear them say they would not take it on if they had known.

It appears if you want to make comment about a situation in different countries you will have to choose which country you want to write about first as the second will just be plain plagiarism of the first!

Read more »

There is no poverty in New Zealand

9506558

Seems that it’s not just me who has the balls the say it.  But Jamie Whyte goes the extra mile by articulating exactly why this is so.

There is no poverty in New Zealand. Misery, depravity, hopelessness, yes; but no poverty.

The poorest in New Zealand are the unemployed. They receive free medical care, free education for their children and enough cash to pay for basic food, clothing and (subsidised) housing. Most have televisions, refrigerators and ovens. Many even own cars.

That isn’t poverty.

It certainly isn’t.  Especially when poverty is defined as something where you can’t afford a takeaway once a month, you have no access to the Internet from home and you can’t afford a basic holiday each year.  I mean, that’s just getting absurd.   Read more »

Tagged:

Why you’re still a loser, or You suck at New Year’s resolutions

Steve Braunias has turned his brain off, which is a shame because I think he actually has one. He has fallen into the classic trap of lazy journalists of making listicles and turning them into a column.

Sure, we do that sometimes but when he writes just three articles a week it seems just plain lazy.

His New Year’s listicle has five things he thinks we need more of:

  1. More money for the poor
  2. More refugees
  3. More games of cricket that the Black Caps win resoundingly and thrillingly
  4. More regional news
  5. More peace love and understanding.

Let’s examine those shall we.   Read more »

Lindsay Mitchell tears the Morgan Foundation a new one

Lindsay Mitchell has written to the Dominion Post but, with their poor circulation, her letter will barely get read.

So, in the interests of greater coverage and transparency, here is her blog post calling out the Morgan Foundation.

An article appeared in this morning’s DomPost from one Dr Jess Berentson-Shaw of the Morgan Foundation. Apparently the first of three.

My response by way of a letter-to-the-editor:

Dear Editor

Dr Jess Berentson-Shaw of the Morgan Foundation (DomPost, Jan 1) argues that giving families cash with “no strings attached” is the best way of reducing child poverty. To support her argument she quotes from The Economist, “Unconditional Cash Transfers work better than almost anyone would have expected. They dent the stereotype of poor people as inherently feckless and ignorant”.    Read more »