PPTA

David Cameron makes extension of charter schools programme key to his government

In David Cameron’s speech to the Queen he made a focus of education and the expansion of their charter schools programme.

The second big focus of this Queen’s Speech is championing social justice. That starts with education: a decent schooling for every child, no matter where they’re from. Our school reforms in the last Parliament were bold; one million more children are now learning in good or outstanding schools. In this Parliament they will be bolder still: taking over and turning into Academies not just failing schools but coasting ones too, as part of our new Education and Adoption Bill; opening not just a few more Free Schools, but 500 more.

Read more »

Tagged:

Face of the day

Alwyn Poole(1)

Alwyn Poole, Principal and Academic Manager PHOTO- Supplied Whaleoil.co.nz

Today’s face of the day has written a guest post over at Kiwi Blog that is well worth a read. You will remember Alwyn from my Charter school Perception series. He points out a few home truths about the PPTA and the Labour Party that deserve further sunlight. Charter schools have the goal of improving outcomes for the exact same students that the PPTA and The Labour Party say they care about. I suspect that the genuine reason behind their opposition to Charter schools is that it wasn’t their idea in the first place. They seem to oppose for the sake of opposition instead of acknowledging that Charter Schools can be an effective solution to the very ills that they demand be addressed.

 

…You would therefore think that any major disparity in University Entrance results would have opposition politicians, teacher unions and educationalists raging – and parents on the street.

The PPTA used to campaign on this. In a 2009 report they stated:

New Zealand has a tail of students with low academic achievement. Although internationally standardised test data for literacy, numeracy and science show New Zealand does very well in terms of its average performance, we have high quality but low equity achievement. Almost all of the students “at risk” are found in state schools, the highest proportion of which is in lower decile schools. The skewed nature of educational disadvantage correlates with family income and ethnicity. However, there is increasing evidence that genuine solutions can be found to reduce this problem.

http://www.ppta.org.nz/events-info-forms/doc_view/582-secondary-education-and-the-economic-crisis

The Labour Party manifesto in 2011 acknowledged the problem:

Some children are missing out on a quality education. A good education is a human right and we will work to make sure the most vulnerable students don’t miss out: Māori, Pasifika, children from low-income families, children with special needs, victims of bullying and violence, and those who struggle to achieve academically and don’t have a clear post-school pathway to work or higher education.

https://www.labour.org.nz/sites/default/files/2011%20Labour%20Party%20Manifesto.pdf

However, after the 2011 ACT/National agreement to introduce Charter Schools as a small part of a solution to address the problem for priority learners the issue stopped being of importance. Any effort to point it out might be seen as an endorsement of a policy that the Opposition and associated unions had chosen not to like. Since that moment almost all of their protest energy has gone into trying to eradicate Charter Schools as opposed to trying to find solutions to the huge disparities in the outcomes of young people in NZ. This expensive, false, and misdirected protest finally reached the point of outright comedy when Labour and the unions raged about how a Charter School spent money from multiple sources on a waka. They currently say very little about the outcomes for priority learners in many of our high schools. These schools that receive tens of millions of dollars every year. They have tied their own hands with the mantra of “world-class” that they dreamed up to imply that there was nothing to see here and no need for change. They have fallen silent about inequitable outcomes when this generation needs them to stand strong.

Recently the NCEA and UE qualifications data was released for 2014.

Read more »

PPTA President Loves Education that brings Systemic Failure of the Poor

Angela-Roberts

In a “my job is tough please cry me a river” article PPTA President Angela Roberts closes by stating:

Public education is important for a nation. We have a great system in New Zealand and these challenges come about so we can improve our great curriculum.

So she is happy with:

– many decile 1 & 2 schools getting Year 13 UE pass rates of less than 20% while decile 9 & 10 are almost uniformly above 60%.

– ongoing gaps for Maori and Pasifika compared to the rest of the New Zealand population.   Read more »

Charter Schools Perception Series: The Critics

charter-schoolsvs-ppta-630x568

Partnership Schools or Charter Schools came about after the 2011 General Election due to an agreement between the National Party and the Act Party. The legislation passed with a five vote majority.The Charter School model was criticised by other political parties, educational authorities and teacher organisations as well as some members of the public.

A summary of the key concerns that they raised at that time are below:

1) The concern that that the National-ACT alliance had a hidden agenda which was to set up charter schools as an alternative to state schools in order to eventually replace them.

‘The Government’s plans for charter schools are a stealth privatisation of education’

-Young Labour Press release

One of the Charter schools I visited, Vanguard Military School, includes amongst its students those rejected by the State School system, students who have been expelled or suspended. The other two Charter schools told me that compared to State Schools the number of ex home schooled children on their roll is very high. That indicates to me that the purpose of Charter schools is to provide education for students who are currently not doing well in State education, rather than to replace State education.

Read more »

PPTA will be outraged over this!

The government is spending $298 million on four new schools via a PPP (i.e. a private company is making a profit).

Education Minister Hekia Parata last week signed the $298 million contract with the Future Schools Partners (FSP) consortium to finance, design, construct, and maintain Ormiston Junior College in Auckland, Aranui Community Campus and Rolleston Secondary School in Canterbury and Wakatipu High School in Queenstown.

Eventually this will cover 6000 students and the set up cost equates to $9.83 million per 200 children.

Charter Schools are all charitable and their set-up equates to $1.12 million per 200 children.    Read more »

PPTA President’s School Highly Funded Compared to Charters

In Saturday’s NZ Herald PPTA President Angela Roberts declared a “broken heart” and “hurt” over a Northland Charter School buying a waka.

This is in keeping with her attempt to protect the PPTA patch against the perceived threat of nine marauding Charter Schools.

She is trying to create the impression that Charter Schools are over-funded. In her PPTA profile Roberts declares herself a teacher of Drama and Economics at Stratford High School.

This school is long established and yet has funding of $8,865.20 per student (over $4.7 million in total – excluding buildings and centralised services).

Four of the nine Charters have got their per student costs below that level already – well within the first two years of their existence. For those schools their annual building costs are included in that figure and well as cashed-up funding for centralised services they don’t receive.   Read more »

What should break the heart of a PPTA President

In Saturday’s NZ Herald PPTA President Angela Roberts announced that a Charter School spending less than her annual salary (and funded from a variety of sources) to buy a Waka for their children to use “breaks my heart” and “hurts”.

What should really break the heart of a PPTA President?

Shouldn’t it be massively funded PPTA staffed schools achieving atrocious results for children that lock them into unemployment and negative social cycles. Shouldn’t it be the huge set of negative differentials in New Zealand for Maori and Pasifika students?

No doubt people are trying hard in these schools but the results should be breaking Roberts’ heart. Here a few examples from State Schools where children need help:

Tamaki College gets $6 million per year (exclusive of buildings and centralised services) but only 44% of their Year 11s get NCEA Level 1 and only 11% of their Year 13s get UE.    Read more »

Face of the day

Tom Haig PPTA Blogger and critic of Charter schools

Tom Haig PPTA Blogger and critic of Charter schools

Today’s face of the day is Tom Haig a blogger at The PPTA Blog

Screenshot-Facebook

Screenshot-Facebook

Tom appears to be a master in the Art of ‘ Dirty ‘ Politics. Nicky Hager has explained to us all what Dirty Politics is. It is when someone whose views he does not agree with successfully influences public opinion by getting their stories/narrative into the Mainstream media.Tom has clearly achieved that as his blog post on the $100,000 Waka story went live on the exact same day it broke on the New Zealand Herald. Collusion? You betcha.

Screen shot 2015-05-02 at 8.07.48 PM Read more »

Charter Schools Perception series: The Teachers Part One

March this year  I was invited to visit three Charter schools, South Auckland Middle School, Vanguard Military school and West Auckland Middle School. Before I visited them I also visited a private school, Mt Hobson Middle School that has been in operation since 2003.

IMG_0570

The model on which two Charter schools have been based, Mount Hobson Middle School which opened in 2003 -Photo Whaleoil.co.nz

I did that because the Charter schools of West Auckland and South Auckland are based on the model that Mt Hobson Middle school established when it opened in 2003.

South Auckland Middle school was opened in 2014 but has twelve years of experience behind it because of Mount Hobson Middle School. West Auckland Middle school opened its doors for the first time this year. Both Charter schools have a ratio of one teacher to fifteen students. Mount Hobson has a ratio of one teacher to twelve students due to space constraints.

IMG_0579

Science class at Mt Hobson Middle School. -Photo Whaleoil.co.nz

Below is a transcript/ summary of my interviews with two teachers at South Auckland Middle school. Both teachers that I interviewed are registered and experienced. The teachers at South Auckland Middle School on average are paid 3% more than their counter parts in State schools.

IMG_0571

Part of the Middle school model is community service.

Read more »

Another registered teacher before the courts

If you listen to Chris Hipkins having teachers registered is to protect the kids. They oppose charter schools because there is no requirement to have every teacher registered.

Yet almost daily we hear of registered teachers before the courts…they have replaced the Catholic Church as the haven for kiddy fiddlers and sex pests.

A male teacher has denied sending photos of his penis to a 16-year-old student, but admitted sending inappropriate messages, including: “U shw me first”.

The Lower Hutt teacher – who has interim name suppression – was accused of sending the girl photographs of himself and explicit images of his genitals during an inappropriate Facebook exchange.

The teacher was asked to tutor the teenage girl in 2013, an arrangement that continued until the end of school year.    Read more »