PPTA

Teacher Unions and Green/Labour Opposition smack down the kids

Despite their attempts at rhetoric to the contrary the union and opposition stance against Charter Schools is looking more and more stupid. Especially the “there is no evidence of success overseas” approach.
Some pieces speak for themselves:

Recently, a leading education research center at Stanford University released a comprehensive study looking at the academic performance of students in public charter schools compared to their traditional school peers in 27 states.

The results of this study deliver promising news for students in Mississippi whose needs are not currently being met, especially for the two-thirds of our public school students who are growing up in poverty. Across the nation, charter school students living in poverty gain the equivalent of an extra 14 days of instruction in reading and 22 days in math each year compared to their traditional public school counterparts. African-American students in poverty who attend charter schools see an even larger gain with the equivalent of an additional 29 days of learning in reading and 36 days in math per year when compared to their traditional public school counterparts.

These findings are not alone. Since 2010, four national studies and 11 regional studies from across the country found similar positive academic performance results.

Of course, the most important measure of a transformational education is whether students are graduating prepared for college and career. How do public charter schools fit in that equation? Mississippians must ask that question, especially considering we have one of the lowest social mobility rates in the nation.

Last month, Mathematica Policy Research announced some preliminary research results that measured the effects of charter schools on long-term educational attainment and subsequent earnings of public charter school students. They found significant evidence that charter schools are increasing educational attainment and are boosting long-term earnings of students — ending the cycle of poverty for many low-income students enrolled in charter schools.

Read more »

The PPTA doesn’t care about kids

PPTA-boss-nasty

The PPTa demonstrates why they should be deregistered as a union.

They don’t care about education or kids, they are hell bent on politicking and are so focused on revenge against charter schools they have implemented a boycott of them.

Like their preferred political party they are resorting to the nasty.

If you had one word to describe the feeling in the room at Mangere’s Rise Up school it would be hope.

The beginning of the new school year meant opening day for a new school in a struggling south Auckland community and parents and teachers are desperate for success. But even as it opens, the teachers’ union wants the charter school and others like it to fail, so much so they are banning their members from having anything to do with them.  Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit: SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

PPTA opposes courses because kids might get a job out of them

You really have to wonder about the state of mind of teachers who oppose literally everything in education, including the possibility of students getting jobs.

Russell Blackstock reports:

It is 7.40 on a humid Auckland morning and a dedicated group of wannabe IT experts is already lining up outside a classroom at Avondale College in the west of the city.

While waiting for their teacher to arrive, the students are busily updating their social media pages and browsing news sites on smartphones and hand-held tablets.

Most of their school friends are barely out of bed, still at home wolfing down breakfast.

The youngsters — aged 13 to 17 — are enrolled in the school’s new Innovation Programme, a partnership with United States giant Microsoft. The kids are hoping for a headstart into computer industry roles such as software and game designers, solution architects and project managers.

Bill and Melinda Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs — the computer whizzes of the past taught themselves to code at home in their bedrooms, but the geeks of the future will learn in the classroom.

The classes run from 8am every weekday before the regular school day starts.

The students also attend for three hours most Saturday mornings and even during the holidays.

So they even volunteer to attend classes outside of normal school hours…perish the thought that they might just be enjoying the courses.

David Officer is just 13 but is already devising a programme to help teachers mark students’ work.

Madeleine Day, 16, is developing a mobile asset-management system that she hopes will help the fuel industry make complex calculations about weights and measures.

“The course is fantastic and is geared towards preparing you for a job or further education,” Day says.

“I would like to become a software engineer or work in the gaming industry, ideally for the likes of Microsoft or Google.”

Sounds promising…but wait here come the whingers.

Not everyone agrees that public-private partnerships are a good thing. The Post Primary Teachers’ Association has expressed concerns at such ventures.

John Guthrie, senior lecturer at the University of Otago’s Business School, warns that large corporations like Microsoft can simply use such courses to capture future customers and headhunt employees.

“It is not unlike a bank targeting youngsters and encouraging them to save with them,” he says.

“The hope is that if they get them early enough, the kids will become customers for life. It makes good business sense.

So the kids might end up with a job at the end of school?  Yes, I can see why some would view that as be a disaster. The teacher unions wouldn’t want kids to succeed now would they?

 

Source/ NZ Herald

Teachers unite against new Teachers Council

It is a true concern to me that the first reaction from the teachers against the more robust attitude of the new Teachers Council rules to expose the worst of the worst to full public scrutiny by banding together and trying to protect their own.

Teachers are uniting to fight for better representation on the new body replacing the Teachers Council.

The establishment of a new professional body for teachers – the Education Council of Aotearoa New Zealand (Educanz) – has the secondary schools teachers’ union going to battle over, what they say, are attempts to control them.

The Post-Primary Teachers Association is holding paid union meetings nationwide next month to inform teachers of the changes and encourage them to make submissions to the education and science select committee, which is overseeing the bill that was introduced to Parliament this month.

“It’s clear from the bill that the intention isn’t so much to raise the status of teaching as to remove professional autonomy and bring teachers firmly under the control of politicians,” PPTA president Angela Roberts said.

Actually, no.

We’re trying to get the teachers and their union to throw out the bad apples.  By protecting these sexual deviants behind name suppression for so long, the PPTA have overplayed their hands.   Read more »

Te Ururoa Flavell calls out the teacher unions

Te Ururoa Flavell has called out the teacher unions who are boycotting a charter school in Whangarei.

Te Ururoa Flavell, Maori Party Co-Leader, has expressed disappointment at the influence of PPTA in advising Whangarei Boys High teachers to not teach students who attend Te Kura Hourua Te Kapeha Whetu.

“As I understand it the Board of Trustees at Whangarei Boys High was happy to support Kura Hourua students in specific areas such as the visual arts. That type of cooperation has been modelled in the relationships that many other kura establish with general schools, wananga, polytechnics and other education providers across New Zealand. It represents a dynamic relationship that we should surely be fostering in our communities – that the education and learning of our students impacts on us all,” says Te Ururoa Flavell, Maori Party Co-Leader.

“I recognise that Partnership Schools is a major political issue and teachers have a right to their views on educational policy, but what about the kids? Surely we should be putting the best interests of our young people ahead of our politics.”

“I was a teacher for many years and I know that the profession prides itself on putting the interests of our children first, but this flies in the face of those values. I would have thought as teachers, that what matters is that every student experiences success. That’s what Te Kapeha Whetu want. That’s what the Maori Party wants. Come on PPTA – surely there are other ways of making political statements that do not impact so immediately on our kids.”  Read more »

Which is it really PPTA? World class or struggling?

When opposing Charter Schools the PPTA constantly state that all is well and that the one size fits all system is “world class”.

This morning when the Herald reports on school injuries the report stated:

The figures have put the spotlight back on the level of health and safety culture appropriate for schools, and an education union has said the increases show a schooling system straining to cope.

The PPTA President (who seems to keep no record of what she says in different situations) states:     Read more »

Schools to teach kids to respect others? It’s too late by then

Some dumb poll returned a result that 74% of adults think it might be a good idea for schools to teach children respect when dealing with sex education; not just the mechanics of it.

Nearly three-quarters of New Zealanders feel that the Roast Busters case showed high school students needed to be taught about respectful attitudes to sex, not just the mechanics of sexual intercourse.

Sex education and rape prevention came into the spotlight in October amid allegations against Auckland teenagers who boasted on the internet about having sex with drunk and underage girls.

Herald-DigiPoll survey showed 74.7 per cent of respondents believed high schools should teach more than the physical and medical aspects of sex and also emphasise respect for sexual partners.

Following the Roast Busters scandal, Prime Minister John Key said the Government would have to tread carefully in expanding sex education in schools because some parents felt it would cut across their responsibilities and rights and others would feel that more education would keep young women safer and allow them to better understand their rights.

It was a very delicate balance which had to be right, he said.

Fewer than one in five people surveyed felt that shaping attitudes to sex was the sole domain of parents.

There is nothing wrong with reinforcing the message, but if you think you can turn around years of what they see at home with a few hours in class, you’re seriously deluded.   Read more »

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I bet he was registered

Another day another registered ratbag teacher before the courts.

Labour and the teacher unions all claim that registration protects the kids…it is starting to look like registration protects kids as well as the catholic church does.

A Nelson teacher found guilty of indecently assaulting five children under the age of 12 can now be named.

In the Nelson District Court on November 22, Lawrence Shaw, 44, was found guilty of indecently assaulting five girls under the age of 12.

A nine-man, three-woman jury took two hours to convict Shaw on all charges. He will be sentenced on January 15.  Read more »

Teachers quit union in support of principal after bullying by PPTA

A bunch of teachers have quit the PPTA after the union launched an attack against their principal.

A group of Columba College teachers has come out in defence of the school for the first time since allegations surfaced of the principal bullying staff.

Nine staff supporting Elizabeth Wilson and the board of trustees were named in an email sent to the Otago Daily Times, but the group wished to remain anonymous because some of them had already been ”named and shamed” for their views.

One of the group said a number of staff members withdrew from the PPTA as they were unhappy with the allegations made and the subsequent actions.

While some members of staff obviously had concerns, this was not necessarily the feeling of the majority, she said.

There are 42 fulltime teachers and about 10 part-time teachers at the college.  Read more »