PPTA

Charter Schools Perception series: The Teachers Part One

March this year  I was invited to visit three Charter schools, South Auckland Middle School, Vanguard Military school and West Auckland Middle School. Before I visited them I also visited a private school, Mt Hobson Middle School that has been in operation since 2003.

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The model on which two Charter schools have been based, Mount Hobson Middle School which opened in 2003 -Photo Whaleoil.co.nz

I did that because the Charter schools of West Auckland and South Auckland are based on the model that Mt Hobson Middle school established when it opened in 2003.

South Auckland Middle school was opened in 2014 but has twelve years of experience behind it because of Mount Hobson Middle School. West Auckland Middle school opened its doors for the first time this year. Both Charter schools have a ratio of one teacher to fifteen students. Mount Hobson has a ratio of one teacher to twelve students due to space constraints.

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Science class at Mt Hobson Middle School. -Photo Whaleoil.co.nz

Below is a transcript/ summary of my interviews with two teachers at South Auckland Middle school. Both teachers that I interviewed are registered and experienced. The teachers at South Auckland Middle School on average are paid 3% more than their counter parts in State schools.

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Part of the Middle school model is community service.

Read more »

Another registered teacher before the courts

If you listen to Chris Hipkins having teachers registered is to protect the kids. They oppose charter schools because there is no requirement to have every teacher registered.

Yet almost daily we hear of registered teachers before the courts…they have replaced the Catholic Church as the haven for kiddy fiddlers and sex pests.

A male teacher has denied sending photos of his penis to a 16-year-old student, but admitted sending inappropriate messages, including: “U shw me first”.

The Lower Hutt teacher – who has interim name suppression – was accused of sending the girl photographs of himself and explicit images of his genitals during an inappropriate Facebook exchange.

The teacher was asked to tutor the teenage girl in 2013, an arrangement that continued until the end of school year.    Read more »

Even the Australian media publish the good Charter School news

The left-wing media and their pals in parliament constantly harp on about charter schools on behalf of their union buddies.

They are patch protecting and can produce no real evidence to support their claims.

On the other side of the argument, though, there is building evidence that should start to hush them up.

The problem is in getting that information out there through the filters of the media…like the new Stanford University study of charter schools that even Australian media has highlighted but remains untouched by NZ media.

Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) has a new study out finding urban charter schools outperform traditional public schools (TPS) in urban areas.

The results are the latest in mounting evidence that many charter schools provide tremendous benefit to students — particularly those located in urban areas.

“The charter school sector has gotten to a point of maturity where it’s dominated by established charters that have stood the test of time and are operating a lot more efficiently and effectively for kids, and so we’re starting to see now this general positive impact of charters on student achievement,” Patrick Wolf, PH.D., a distinguished professor in the Department of Education Reform at the University of Arkansas, told Business Insider.

The study looked at 41 urban areas in 22 states. Here’s what it found:     Read more »

Teacher union unhappy? That means something good is being done

Members of the secondary school teachers’ union have endorsed its plan to boycott nominations for the new teacher registration body, the Education Council.

The Post Primary Teachers Association (PPTA) said 22 percent of its members voted on the issue, and 95 percent agreed they would not accept a nomination or appointment to the council.

The association is unhappy teachers are losing their right to elect some of the members when the council replaces the current Teachers Council.

Instead, all members will be appointed by the Education Minister from a pool of nominees. Read more »

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Key announces MP pay cut – public sector unions pucker up

A move to rein in politicians’ pay doesn’t give moral authority to the Government in upcoming pay negotiations, public sector representatives say.

Prime Minister John Key will use urgent legislation to overhaul the Remuneration Authority Act as a result of anger at the size of MPs’ pay increases.

MPs’ pay will now be pegged to the average public sector pay increase for the previous year.

That means the latest pay rise will now be between 1 and 2 per cent – with the Government taking more advice before revealing the exact amount.

Richard Wagstaff, the Public Service Association national secretary, said 40,000 members in bargaining this year earn a lot less than those in Parliament.

“I think it is a political distraction what the PM says … now they think they have the moral authority to tell everyone else, no matter how badly paid, they don’t deserve a pay rise.”

PPTA president Angela Roberts said teachers’ pay had not kept pace with inflation.

“[MPs] have basically kept up with inflation, and what they’re saying is they’d like to keep up. We have a hefty catch-up before we can go into the future with a keep-up [pay-rise].” Read more »

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Teachers and their unions don’t like the new Education Council. Good

When it comes to professional disciplinary bodies, there is always at least the perception of conflict when the profession sits in judgement of their own.  Lawyers, police, journalists, real estate agents – they all go to their peers to be judged.

The government is taking a sensible step away from this with teachers, and it’s fair to say it’s ruffled some feathers.

Groups representing primary principals and secondary teachers are planning to ignore this week’s call for nominations to the council because they are angry they are losing the right to elect any of the organisation’s members – instead the Education Minister will appoint them all.

The primary teachers’ union is also unhappy, but it will challenge the Government to choose people who represent teachers by running its own nomination process.

The Education Council is replacing the Teachers Council and will be a statutory body rather than an autonomous Crown entity, a change that places it further from government influence.

However, all the new organisation’s nine members will be selected by the Education Minister from a pool of nominees that anyone can put forward.

To be clear – anyone can be nominated.  It doesn’t actually freeze teachers, principals their union mates or any strong advocate out from the process.   Read more »

A reader emails about Pat Newman and the demise of the Teachers Council

Following on from your article ‘WHEN THE UNIONS, LABOUR AND MILITANT PRINCIPALS COMPLAIN‘ regarding Pat Newman; another reader has provided an update on his undisclosed role and affiliation with the New Zealand Teachers Council.

Hopefully Pat Newman reads Whaleoil, much like Mary Rose Painter (Communications Advisor at the New Zealand Teachers Council), refer Whaleoil article ‘ HOW DID THIS HAPPEN? HE WAS REGISTERED (UPDATED)‘ where Mary had emailed requesting the article be amended.

Interesting to note is the Teachers Council and Anna Kirtlan (NZPPTA Communications Advisor and PPTA News Editor) have also made comment in other Whaleoil articles; you have obviously caught their attention Cameron and team.

As a parent, who has had the misfortune of sitting across the table from these people at the Teachers Council, I would like to say they should be ashamed of themselves! With confidence I know I am not a lone parent celebrating the demise of the New Zealand Teachers Council, it has been long overdue for an overhaul.

For the benefit of the Teachers Council (including Pat Newman) and PPTA readers here are some cold hard facts you have unsurprisingly failed to address.

‘Review of the New Zealand Teachers Council’

Report to Hon. Hekia Parata

QUOTE:

” In fact only 10 percent of all complaints referred to the CAC have been referred to the Disciplinary Tribunal. The Review Committee was openly told that, in practice, employers and the unions worked together to try to prevent reporting to the Council and that the reporting requirement was used as a lever to settle a dispute”

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Angela Roberts really is very funny, and that is funny strange, not funny haha

Angela Roberts is upset, as usual, about Charter schools.

Post Primary Teachers’ Association president Angela Roberts said it was frustrating to see charter schools growing when they offered little that was different to regular state schools.

“They’re not doing anything particularly innovative,” she said.

“We have service academies, which provide that access to the military training. We have cross-curricular … studies happening in schools around the place and we have really culturally responsive schools that have immersion classes for Pasifika and Maori kids, so I haven’t seen anything too new.”

Ms Roberts said parents were being attracted to the charter schools by the small classes they were able to offer thanks to their small scale.

So, she won’t visit the schools but watching from afar she says “nothing [innovative] to see here”.

Last year the complaint was that the Charter Schools rolls were too low. Now she complains they are too high.

The organisation award for utter stupidity in the face of reality goes to the PPTA.

Well done to a growing group of families making a great choice for their kids.   Read more »

A textbook case of Teacher Registration and Council secrecy failure

I know I have bored some of you to death with the never-ending examples of bad teachers.  But there is a point to it.  If I didn’t highlight each and every occasion, you simply wouldn’t know the extent of the problem.

There are a number of dimensions to this.  One, is the suppression of any details – sometimes even the name of the teacher and the school.

The other is the fact that Teacher Registration is being held up by teachers and their unions as being an essential component in protecting the children from bad teachers, when the opposite is demonstrably true.

Take this case:

The Teachers Council has confirmed it is investigating the head of an Auckland Charter School which is set to open its doors to students for the first time this week.

Middle School West, in Auckland, was officially opened yesterday, but on Tuesday 130 students will begin their education there.

James Haggett is Principal of the Charter School, a position he took up in November last year. Read more »

PPTA points the finger – 3 pointing back at them

State school costs hit hard at this time of the year. Every kid having a laptop at school is highly debatable in terms of its educational worth but Principals clearly think they need to keep up with the school down the road.

Fairfax and the Herald both carry articles this morning on school costs.

In the Fairfax article Angela Roberts of the PPTA throws the blame on the taxpayer (via the government):

Post Primary Teachers’ Association president Angela Roberts said costs for parents were rising as the Government “abdicated responsibility” for costs of learning essentials.

“There is a mismatch between what New Zealand really wants for their kids and what the Government will fund,” she said.

Charter Schools are a lot cheaper for families – no donations and many costs such as uniform,stationery and IT covered.    Read more »