PPTA

Key announces MP pay cut – public sector unions pucker up

A move to rein in politicians’ pay doesn’t give moral authority to the Government in upcoming pay negotiations, public sector representatives say.

Prime Minister John Key will use urgent legislation to overhaul the Remuneration Authority Act as a result of anger at the size of MPs’ pay increases.

MPs’ pay will now be pegged to the average public sector pay increase for the previous year.

That means the latest pay rise will now be between 1 and 2 per cent – with the Government taking more advice before revealing the exact amount.

Richard Wagstaff, the Public Service Association national secretary, said 40,000 members in bargaining this year earn a lot less than those in Parliament.

“I think it is a political distraction what the PM says … now they think they have the moral authority to tell everyone else, no matter how badly paid, they don’t deserve a pay rise.”

PPTA president Angela Roberts said teachers’ pay had not kept pace with inflation.

“[MPs] have basically kept up with inflation, and what they’re saying is they’d like to keep up. We have a hefty catch-up before we can go into the future with a keep-up [pay-rise].” Read more »

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Teachers and their unions don’t like the new Education Council. Good

When it comes to professional disciplinary bodies, there is always at least the perception of conflict when the profession sits in judgement of their own.  Lawyers, police, journalists, real estate agents – they all go to their peers to be judged.

The government is taking a sensible step away from this with teachers, and it’s fair to say it’s ruffled some feathers.

Groups representing primary principals and secondary teachers are planning to ignore this week’s call for nominations to the council because they are angry they are losing the right to elect any of the organisation’s members – instead the Education Minister will appoint them all.

The primary teachers’ union is also unhappy, but it will challenge the Government to choose people who represent teachers by running its own nomination process.

The Education Council is replacing the Teachers Council and will be a statutory body rather than an autonomous Crown entity, a change that places it further from government influence.

However, all the new organisation’s nine members will be selected by the Education Minister from a pool of nominees that anyone can put forward.

To be clear – anyone can be nominated.  It doesn’t actually freeze teachers, principals their union mates or any strong advocate out from the process.   Read more »

A reader emails about Pat Newman and the demise of the Teachers Council

Following on from your article ‘WHEN THE UNIONS, LABOUR AND MILITANT PRINCIPALS COMPLAIN‘ regarding Pat Newman; another reader has provided an update on his undisclosed role and affiliation with the New Zealand Teachers Council.

Hopefully Pat Newman reads Whaleoil, much like Mary Rose Painter (Communications Advisor at the New Zealand Teachers Council), refer Whaleoil article ‘ HOW DID THIS HAPPEN? HE WAS REGISTERED (UPDATED)‘ where Mary had emailed requesting the article be amended.

Interesting to note is the Teachers Council and Anna Kirtlan (NZPPTA Communications Advisor and PPTA News Editor) have also made comment in other Whaleoil articles; you have obviously caught their attention Cameron and team.

As a parent, who has had the misfortune of sitting across the table from these people at the Teachers Council, I would like to say they should be ashamed of themselves! With confidence I know I am not a lone parent celebrating the demise of the New Zealand Teachers Council, it has been long overdue for an overhaul.

For the benefit of the Teachers Council (including Pat Newman) and PPTA readers here are some cold hard facts you have unsurprisingly failed to address.

‘Review of the New Zealand Teachers Council’

Report to Hon. Hekia Parata

QUOTE:

” In fact only 10 percent of all complaints referred to the CAC have been referred to the Disciplinary Tribunal. The Review Committee was openly told that, in practice, employers and the unions worked together to try to prevent reporting to the Council and that the reporting requirement was used as a lever to settle a dispute”

Read more »

Angela Roberts really is very funny, and that is funny strange, not funny haha

Angela Roberts is upset, as usual, about Charter schools.

Post Primary Teachers’ Association president Angela Roberts said it was frustrating to see charter schools growing when they offered little that was different to regular state schools.

“They’re not doing anything particularly innovative,” she said.

“We have service academies, which provide that access to the military training. We have cross-curricular … studies happening in schools around the place and we have really culturally responsive schools that have immersion classes for Pasifika and Maori kids, so I haven’t seen anything too new.”

Ms Roberts said parents were being attracted to the charter schools by the small classes they were able to offer thanks to their small scale.

So, she won’t visit the schools but watching from afar she says “nothing [innovative] to see here”.

Last year the complaint was that the Charter Schools rolls were too low. Now she complains they are too high.

The organisation award for utter stupidity in the face of reality goes to the PPTA.

Well done to a growing group of families making a great choice for their kids.   Read more »

A textbook case of Teacher Registration and Council secrecy failure

I know I have bored some of you to death with the never-ending examples of bad teachers.  But there is a point to it.  If I didn’t highlight each and every occasion, you simply wouldn’t know the extent of the problem.

There are a number of dimensions to this.  One, is the suppression of any details – sometimes even the name of the teacher and the school.

The other is the fact that Teacher Registration is being held up by teachers and their unions as being an essential component in protecting the children from bad teachers, when the opposite is demonstrably true.

Take this case:

The Teachers Council has confirmed it is investigating the head of an Auckland Charter School which is set to open its doors to students for the first time this week.

Middle School West, in Auckland, was officially opened yesterday, but on Tuesday 130 students will begin their education there.

James Haggett is Principal of the Charter School, a position he took up in November last year. Read more »

PPTA points the finger – 3 pointing back at them

State school costs hit hard at this time of the year. Every kid having a laptop at school is highly debatable in terms of its educational worth but Principals clearly think they need to keep up with the school down the road.

Fairfax and the Herald both carry articles this morning on school costs.

In the Fairfax article Angela Roberts of the PPTA throws the blame on the taxpayer (via the government):

Post Primary Teachers’ Association president Angela Roberts said costs for parents were rising as the Government “abdicated responsibility” for costs of learning essentials.

“There is a mismatch between what New Zealand really wants for their kids and what the Government will fund,” she said.

Charter Schools are a lot cheaper for families – no donations and many costs such as uniform,stationery and IT covered.    Read more »

Another Nail in the “Charter Schools are over-funded” coffin

PPTA, NZEI and opposition parties have tried to establish the myth of Charter Schools being over-funded in the minds of what they consider to be the gullible public.

For the first 4 Years of the first 5 schools the whole Charter School budget was $19 million (i.e. less than $5 million a year). Charter School start-up funding is approximately $1 million per school.

Hekia Parata has just announced a new State School in Takanini. Start up funding $20 million.

Education Minister Hekia Parata today announced that $20 million has been set aside for the establishment of a new primary school in Takanini, Auckland.

Takanini is a fast-growing suburb and anticipated population growth is expected to generate approximately 4000 additional pupils by 2020.

Ms Parata says Takanini is a sought-after area because of special housing and private land development and there is a need to cater to the booming school-aged population.    Read more »

High Quality Staff at Charter Schools: PPTA NIghtmare

Back in February the PPTA were in full panic mode, and still are, about Charter Schools in NZ.

Their recommendations and comments:

- that PPTA members should not seek to work in charter schools and should avoid all professional, sporting and cultural liaison with the sponsors, managers and employees of said schools

– that the five New Zealand charter schools are simply “useful idiots”

The PPTA exec must have wept when the new schools attracted staff and must be apoplectic when schools like Vanguard Military School and South Auckland Middle School generated quality ERO reports (not a bad effort for “useful idiots”).

For kids who need choice this is clearly good news (a point lost on teacher unions) and there seems better to come. The new Middle School in West Auckland recently announced their leadership and highly academic intent.

James Haggett has been appointed Principal of West Auckland’s newest school, Middle School West Auckland, opening in February 2015.

The new school, based at 4341 Great North Rd in Glendene, is for boys and girls in Years 7-10.

Mr Haggett brings experience in two educational examination systems (NCEA and Cambridge), as well as the context of teaching in both the UK and New Zealand.

“I am delighted to lead the establishment of Middle School West Auckland. I identify strongly with the absolute academic drive of the school.

“My experience in the secondary school sector will be useful to ensuring our students are well prepared and transition effectively to the high schools of their choice.”

Mr Haggett’s early teaching career was in low socio-economic schools in the UK. Emigrating to New Zealand seven years ago, he was the Deputy Headmaster in charge of Curriculum at St Peters College, a Catholic secondary school for boys. In addition, he has operated an education consultancy, tutoring students to Excellence level.

Read more »

No more hiding behind suppression for kiddie fiddling teachers

After decades of criminal teachers hiding among the community, recent changes to the Teachers Councils protocols means that teachers that have any sexual connection with students will now face permanent public exposure.

Misbehaving teachers will be routinely named and shamed, even if their misconduct came before a rule change favouring the publication of names, a disciplinary tribunal has ruled.

Former Ashburton College teacher Michael Burrell-Smith recently lost a bid to hide his name after his registration was cancelled for inappropriate relationships with at least two female pupils.

He argued the notice of charge for his conduct was filed and served before July 1, when a rule change came into effect in favour of publishing teachers’ names in disciplinary cases. Previously, the default position was that names were suppressed.

Since the new rules came in, 20 teachers whose misconduct took place before July 1 but whose decisions came out after that have appeared before the tribunal.

Six unsuccessfully sought name suppression. Read more »

Time for Secondary Teachers to flee the PPTA

Angela Roberts and her cohorts in the PPTA have lost the plot.

It is time for secondary teachers to quit their union.

Firstly they waste massive funds opposing charter schools. Money that should be spent for the benefit of their members. Secondly they denigrate their own members through lying to the NZ public and treating the parents of kiwi kids like idiots. Thirdly they crap all over the lower end of the NZ education system where predominantly Maori and Pasifika are failing massively.

In terms of money spent on opposing Charter School Robert’s recently refused to tell Guyon Espiner on Radio NZ how much they had spent.

In terms of lying to their members and the NZ public they have produced another disingenuous document that tries to say State Schools get less than Charter Schools. They fudge the numbers – leaving out centralised services for State Schools, ignoring that Charters are in their start up phase, and ignoring the State Schools get approximately $30million to start while Charters get approx. $1m. They also ignore the official ministry figures.

The PPTA, of course, fail to highlight high per unit funded State schools. The data is easily accessible, you ahve to wonder why the PPTA fails to include these schools in their jihad…but then again they are union controlled schools:

Kia Aroha College: $12,000

Tikipunga High School: $12,300

Portland School: $10,200

Excellere College: $10,400

Pukepoto School: $10,400

Te Rangi Aniwaniwa: $14,600

Awanui School: $9,300    Read more »