Public Service

What would happen if we did this here?

The Telegraph

There is a good chance that the PSA would probably have a fit and march in the streets if this was tried here:

All departments in Whitehall are to be forced to publish quarterly sickness absence rates for all their staff in a bid to help the public purse.

Francis Maude, the Cabinet Office minister responsible for the civil service, said “bad management” across the public sector was costing taxpayers £3.4bn a year. He told the Daily Telegraph he was determined to crack down on the so-called “sickie” culture by making central government departments publish the sickness reports and increasing the spotlight on weak management.

“It’s often down to bad management. If you do the stats properly, you can sometimes find clusters of sickness absence which is often associated with a bad manager,” he said.

Official figures show public sector workers are 63pc more likely to go off sick than their private sector counterparts. Mr Maude said the civil service had to get better at measuring the problem. “One of the things we’re introducing is that every department will have to publish, on a quarterly basis, their sickness absence levels, so you can see the trend and can compare,” he said.

The move follows plans announced last week by the Cabinet Office minister to reform the civil service, which includes weeding out poor performers to improve the delivery of public services.

The Public Service are out of touch

Not just here, in Australia.

The profusion of senior executive service personnel, the 2790 bureaucrats in Canberra who typically earn between $200,000 and $360,000 a year, is even starker. Their number remained broadly flat between 1984 and 2001, but since then their ranks have almost doubled. Entire suburbs of Sydney and Melbourne are paying tax to support these jobs.

Causation runs the other way too. The public service has become so large and top-heavy with overpaid bureaucrats that private salaries are being driven up to giddy heights. The private sector has to offer more money because it cannot guarantee security. Ultimately, this makes consumer prices higher and profits lower. Remuneration in the public sector has lost its moral compass too. As the latest taxation statistics show, 90 per cent of taxpayers have taxable incomes of less than $100,000 a year. If any of these people refused to pay tax because they judged that having 118 people earning more than $280,000 in the departments of climate change and sustainability, for instance, was absurd, they would go to prison. However offensive some pay packets in the corporate world might be, shareholders could still sell their shares.

There are way too many well paid troughing hippies in Australia. Hopefully Abbott will close these departments. Climate change and sustainability staff don’t need to be paid close to $300,000.

A Public Service Notice

A reader drew my attention to this article.

An Auckland primary school teacher will be sentenced in two months’ time after admitting to committing indecent acts with teenage boys.

The middle-aged teacher admitted four offences related to incidents with two 16-year-old boys and two others charges were dropped when he appeared in court of Friday, the Sunday Star Times reported.

Police say he began separate relationships with the boys over four years from September 2005 while they were aged between 12 and 16.

Suppression orders mean the teacher and the school cannot be named. The school says the suppression order makes it difficult to communicate with the community.

The man will be sentenced in July.

– NZPA

As a public service from Whale Oil Beef Hooked we can help the school if you click on this link or this one.

Some more folk for Boris-ing

After the orchestrated obfuscation of oberac by Labour, Michael Cullen, Maryan Street and member of the ACC board it is time to add some more names to the ever growing list of people who need to be Boris-ed.

The ACC Board Chairman Ross Wilson should be the first to go. A ex-CTU President and Labour lackey of the first order. Followed in short order by Peter Neilson, ex-Labour MP and Minister, who is also the chairman of the Labour inspired Business Council for Sustainable Development.

At the same time I’d also send a DCM to Wayne Butson, another union trough snuffler from the Rail and Maritime Transport Union.

I’d put a shot across the bows of Pip Dunphy and Sara Lunam who appear on paper to have qualifications for Board positions but also are double dipping by also being board members of NZ Post where the traitor Jim Bolger is Chairman. To have two board appointments suggests that this duo might be members of the “sisterhood” or ardent loyal lickspittles.

Let the Boris-ing commence.