Rick Santorum

And the Kahui’s are?

3News

Creepy Colin Craig is fast becoming New Zealand’s Rick Santorum. His latest explanation that “gay Parents are not good role models” is simply outrageous.

Mr Craig rubbishes the argument that parenting is about loving the child rather than the sexuality of their parents. “I disagree with that point of view. Love is not all that matters.”

I wonder of Colin Craig thinks the parenting of Chris Kahui and Macsyna King was the pin model he is seeking…I mean gay parents are really examples when compared with them.

Using his logic Colin Craig will come shortly and declare that Maori parents are not good role models either and should be prevented from marrying or having children.

Focussing things that matter, Ctd

NZ Herald

Phil Goff stated before the election that Labour was focussed on things that matter to Kiwi voters. David Shearer has said as much too…presumably he thinks voters are deeply concerned about men wearing matching sweater vests…certainly Trevor Mallard thinks so, as does Jacinda Ardern who were quick to tweet the important fashion disaster to their followers:

Clearly they are seeking some sort of inspiration from David Shearer’s chief of staff but are only brave enough to bare their arms just now.

I’m not too sure that Waitakere Man is a big fan of sleeveless sweater vests…perhaps they are channeling Republican politics where the sweater vest made a big play in the recent Republican primaries. Rick Santorum was even selling them…I wonder if the Labour boys all ordered theirs from Rick Santorum?

Let us pause to consider the sweater vest, that milquetoast item of men’s wear that is neither a sweater nor a vest but something soft and cuddly and in-between. Let us pause to consider the fact that it has become, bizarrely, a sartorial player in the current Republican primary contest. Has ever a piece of clothing seemed less likely to be a political tool?

Yet check in on Rick Santorum today as South Carolina goes to the polls and you can put money on the fact that he will be wearing a sweater vest during his last push for votes. It is his uniform, just as the V-neck sweater and jeans have become standard wear for Mitt Romney while Newt Gingrich has adopted shirtsleeves and a jacket. But while the latter two candidates have been somewhat dismissive of their dressing, refusing to let it become part of the conversation (Romney hasn’t even deigned to acknowledge the assorted jibes and questions about his luxuriant head of hair, though The New York Times saw fit to put the issue on its front page), Santorum has adopted a somewhat more proprietary approach to his vests.

His attitude seems to be: if you can’t beat ’em – that is to say, if you can’t stop a media that makes image as much a part of public office as any platform – then you should join ’em: that is to say, own what you wear, metaphorically as much as literally. To be specific: if you visit the Santorum website you can find, under “donate”, a special limited edition offer. It’s so astonishing, I am going to quote it in full:

“For a limited time, donate $100 or more using the form below, and we will send you an official Rick Santorum For President sweater vest. Perfect for demonstrating solidarity with true conservatives, this vest is a great way to show your support for Rick. It’s 100 per cent cotton, made in the USA, comes in grey, and is yours for your contribution of $100 or more. Don’t let sleeves slow you down – donate today!”

And so the sweater vest comes to NZ politics…who would have ever thought it would be the Labour party that introduced a Republican idea?

In Praise of Solo Mothers

 The Atlantic

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon writes about how her mother influenced her:

A lot has been said about single mothers. Most of it has been less than flattering.

In a notable nugget Senator Rick Santorum said at a town hall meeting, “We are seeing the fabric of this country fall apart, and it’s falling apart because of single moms.” Not long after that, in a public appearance in Erie, Pennsylvania, he accused single mothers of “simply breeding more criminals.” This past fall, he argued that single mothers voted Democrat because their lives were so hard and urged Republicans to “build two parent families” in order to “eliminate that desire for government.”

This Mother’s Day I confess that I am very proud to be from what some would call a broken home. Not because it was easy watching a young woman struggle to be a mother on her own after ending a violent marriage, but precisely because it was so very hard. And “hard” seems to be a word we now avoid, disparage, and devalue in our insta-everything culture.

In other words, the very values that Senator Santorum and so many others say these solo moms undermine are just the values I learned from mine — and the community of women like her I grew up with outside Washington, D.C. What did we learn from these women who worked one or more miserably paid jobs while battling domestic turbulence, hunting for child support, hustling to pay rent, and forcing us to do our homework all on their own?

Everything.

Perseverance, perspective, determination, the need to clean up your own messes and confront your own problems, no matter how difficult. Above all, resilience. And the importance of realizing how much you have, even when “much” feels like nothing.

Santorum quits

NZ Herald

Rick Santorum has quit the GOP presidential nomination race. It looks like Mitt Romney gets to be the guy who loses to Barack Obama.

Rick Santorum, who pulled out of the race for the White House this morning, emerged as an improbable leading contender for the Republican nomination, with a faith-and-family message that caught fire with the party’s most conservative voters.

Even as he quit the rollercoaster Republican presidential race, he remained the candidate who seemed to stir more emotions than most, with his radical views on religion, women and marriage.

His dark horse presidential bid which turned into a surprisingly strong challenge to frontrunner Mitt Romney, long considered the frontrunner but who faced a succession of challengers – most recently and perhaps most persistently Santorum – nipping at his heels.

“This presidential race is over for me,” the former US senator told a crowd at a hastily convened press conference in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Santorum now leaves a clear path to the nomination for the former Massachusetts governor, who is all but assured of locking up the Republican party’s nomination to challenge President Barack Obama in November.

Good

About time a trougher went broke losing a campaign. It will make them stop spending our money.

Rick Santorum told voters at a school here that he’s spent down his savings running for president, and walked away from the money he was making in the private sector.

“I walked away from all of the jobs that I had and all the money,” Santorum said at the Dayton Christian School. He and his wife Karen have been “spending down our savings,” he said.

“That’s not necessarily the best thing to do when you have three kids entering college in the next three years, but our country is worth it,” he said.

The admission adds to Santorum’s underdog appeal, but it also underscores a reality that will bear on him more intensely if he fails to win Ohio on Super Tuesday and his path to victory narrows to almost nothing.

Santorum, who has denied lobbying but worked for companies doing business with the government, reported earning nearly $1 million in 2010.

Dirty Pool

American politics is dirty…and fantastic…check out this case of dirty pool:

Much has been made of Democratic efforts to turn out the vote for Santorum and we see evidence that’s actually happening. Romney leads with actual Republican voters, 43-38. But Santorum’s up 47-10 with Democratic voters, and even though they’re only 8% of the likely electorate that’s enough to put him over the top. The big question now is whether those folks will actually bother to show up and vote tomorrow.

Great Campaign Ads, Ctd

Mitt Romney has been spending million attacking his opponents in the battle for the GOP nomination.

The others are now fighting back, but one of the most effective ads in the fight back has been “Rombo” from Rick Santorum. One of his campaign advisors describes the rationale behind the ad:

“If they see a Romney ad attacking Rick Santorum, I want our [“Rombo”] ad to be in the back of their mind,” Brabender says. “I want them to ask themselves whether they think that kind of thing is presidential, whether it brings the party together. Instead of inspiring us, he’s beating people up?”

Is Rick Right? Ctd

Rick Santorum can be pretty hateful too.

Comparing homosexuality to “man-on-dog” sex:

“If the Supreme Court says that you have the right to consensual [gay] sex within your home, then you have the right to bigamy, you have the right to polygamy, you have the right to incest, you have the right to adultery. You have the right to anything. Does that undermine the fabric of our society? I would argue yes, it does. … That’s not to pick on homosexuality. It’s not, you know, man on child, man on dog, or whatever the case may be. It is one thing.” (AP interview, April 7, 2003)

Is Rick Right? Ctd

Rick Santorum has many views, some I think he gets right, other not so much.

Like this one equating gay marriage to loving your mother-in-law:

“Is anyone saying same-sex couples can’t love each other? I love my children. I love my friends, my brother. Heck, I even love my mother-in-law. Should we call these relationships marriage, too?” (Santorum’s Philadelphia Inquirer column, May 22, 2008)

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Is Rick Right? Ctd

Rick Santorum has lots of views, some controversial others not so much. We have been looking at these over the past few days.

On reminding America that some view Mormonism as “a dangerous cult”. This is of course a direct attack on Mitt Romney who is a Mormon.

“Would the potential attraction to Mormonism by simply having a Mormon in the White House threaten traditional Christianity by leading more Americans to a church that some Christians believe misleadingly calls itself Christian, is an active missionary church, and a dangerous cult?” (Santorum’s Philadelphia Inquirer column, Dec. 20, 2007)

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