Ricki Herbert

Gareth Morgan tries to get rid of cats, gets rid of Ricki Herbert instead

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via Zimbio

Truth broke the news this morning:

THE Wellington Phoenix have axed coach Ricki Herbert.
Truth understands the decision to replace Herbert was made yesterday.

The Nix owners ‚Äď the most high profile being the controversial Gareth Morgan ‚Äď are keen for Herbert to remain in charge for the rest of the season before he takes up a part-time Director of Football role.

Stuff continues:

Wellington Phoenix football coach Ricki Herbert will quit today.

A well placed source confirmed reports that Herbert will not be on the sidelines for tomorrow night’s home A-League match against Newcastle. ¬† Read more »

Ryan Nelsen to retire, Truth reporting

John Matheson at Truth has broken the news that All Whites great Ryan Nelsen has official retired from football and made the call to Ricki Herbert:

Truth can reveal Nelsen rang his New Zealand coach Ricki Herbert at 1pm this afternoon to break the news.
Nelsen, who takes over as Toronto FC coach on Feb 1, will play his last game for Queens Park Rangers on Jan 29.

NZ Football has hoped Nelsen would continue to play for the All Whites until the team qualified for the 2014 World Cup.

But Nelsen has decided the task at Toronto is too big and he needs to focus fully on his first coaching role.

Nelsen retires after playing 49 times for his country.

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Around the blogs and some random impertinent questions

MacDoctor hands Silent T his ass on New Zealands debt burden.

Wellington…so who’d want to live there?

Why has Ricki Herbert’s credit card been declining?

Is it true that Terry Serepisos has really been crying…like real tears?

Hone gets pwned on his own site.

All the sweat, and photos and competition…blah blah blah…Is love in the air?

Stephen Franks writes a great piece about the will of people wanting to look after themselves being thwarted by other people wanting them to be looked after by them.

On the last day of February,¬†during a trip to Christchurch,¬†I¬†raised with a Minister the plight of a friend who needed his¬†computer server¬†to get his business back on its feet.¬† He was with a Christchurch business leader.¬†The friend¬†had new premises sorted. The 14¬†staff were ready.¬†The government was saying it was going to subsidise wages, but they did not need that to forestall redundancy ‚Äď they needed to know when they could restart work.

The server was in his car, shut behind a carpark gate within the cordon area.

Both men¬†were utterly frustrated, having been bounced back and forth between Civil Defence and the Police. They’d offered to put together and pay a specialist¬†team, including engineers and safety experts to go to premises where critical records could¬†be retrieved. They¬†would distract no rescue worker or other official.

No one could give them a decision or even tell them who would make such a decision.

The Minister undertook to enquire, and called back promptly, I was told I could reassure the business people that a plan would be announced that Monday evening that would cover organised access.

Yesterday the friend dropped in to our office in Wellington. He is still not operating. 10 days later his car is still where it was, ready to drive out from the carpark. He has not been allowed to take his own experts in to retrieve the material. You can read about his efforts here and here and here.

Ministers spend what will be hundreds of millions in grants¬†to help employers keep their employees¬†in Christchurch, yet do not have the courage or the drive to insist that ordinary people get access to their own property and capacity to operate.¬† All are terrified of being held “accountable” should anyone permitted to do so¬†make the wrong personal decision to take a risk in order to get their business going.

Time for the bureaucrats to get out of the way of people wanting to make a living who have found a way around the bureaucracy and red tape. The story of course highlights why operating out of the cloud is now a very good idea.

Am I the only person to find all this strict control evidence of our¬†national weakness and¬†disgrace? Is anyone else sick of stirring tales of the effectiveness of the control of the city, and¬†“the authorities” plans to¬†look after the helpless people,¬†while those who want to help themselves are treated as the¬†problem.

Many of the stories are thinly disguised boasting about having and wielding the power to boss others around. Politicians on our screens every night talk about their plans and their roles. Meanwhile, the people who must do the reinstatement work, who want to get to work, who are willing to absorb the risks or manage them, if they are not to spend their next few years beholden to others, are supposed to feel grateful and respectful to their masters.

I was¬†sad 10 days ago¬†to see the huge manpower occupied in making the cordon effective. All those able young muscles standing for days and nights¬†just¬†saying “no”, when a few¬†diggers and thousands of iron bars and shovels and brooms could have seen a transformation of their immediate neighbourhood. Why are they still necessary? Jane Bowron tells us in her diary articles ‚Äď because of fear of looters. An army of people employed to stop honest people from getting their own property, out of fear of criminals. Why are the criminals not terrified of the honest, and the law? The answer is simple, the nannies have emasculated the law.

They’ve also emasculated themselves. They will respond with dramatic gestures ‚Äď like National States of Emergency, and laws that suspend laws. But they are too scared to do the only thing that will truly restore their manhood ‚Äď give it back to ordinary people first.