Selwyn Pellett

And the criticism still mounts…

The Nation was brutal this morning.

This is what Jim Anderton had to say about Labour’s party vote campaign strategy.

Lisa Owen: We saw Mana, Mt Albert, Christchurch there, where the party vote was seriously eroded. What do you think went wrong there on the ground? What was wrong?

Jim Anderton: Well, there’s two serious points you haven’t mentioned — one is that 13 of the Labour electorates got less than 15% of the party vote, and in the strong Labour electorates, mostly the Labour vote went down in the party vote. In truth, we had more people not on the roll or not voting than the entire vote that the National party vote got or the entire vote of all the parties opposing National. Now, that’s a very worrying trend for the first time. And the worrying thing for Labour is that this isn’t the worst result that’s ever been had. I mean, the National party had a worse result in 2002; they got 22% of the vote, but in the three years following that, they caught up and nearly beat the Labour party in 2005, and in the three years since 2011, when the result was not good for Labour, they’ve done even worse. So this is really a very major problem to face.

Lisa Owen: It took them two terms to come back, and we’ll talk more about that later, but I’m interested in what your thoughts are and why these people didn’t come out and vote. Why couldn’t they be bothered?

Jim Anderton: Well, I think the Labour party are very wise to have put a stamp on having a very careful root-and-branch review of what actually happened, and I’ll give you one example — 10 months ago, a young Cook Island girl, if she wouldn’t mind me calling her a girl, probably woman, from Auckland came to Christchurch and thrashed the National party in Christchurch East, thrashed. They got a hiding to nothing. And over 60% of the vote; she actually polled more votes than a very well-respected long-time member, Lianne Dalziel. Now, how come 10 months later, in the whole of Christchurch, the vote in Christchurch was lower than the national average? Now, that’s a very serious question to answer. I have one idea about it, and that’s organisation. I was a campaign manager for that by-election, and I said to Labour, ‘The reason that we’re doing well here is that we’re highly organised. We’ve focused on the policy.’ And I agree with Helen about reflecting to people what they really need and what their aspirations are and working out specific policies that meet those needs. Now, that’s exactly what we did in Christchurch East, and I don’t think that was done in this election.

Lisa Owen: I just want to do a round robin here.

Jim Anderton: And one of the reasons for that is that Labour no longer has the mass membership of a party that can accomplish that. It can do it in one by-election, but you can’t do it across the country, and that’s the lesson from this election.

Read more »

The Cunliffe wants to remain as leader after election, citing Clark precedent

I have been picking up this talk all week, from my Labour sources.

That The Cunliffe believes and is working towards retaining 60% support of caucus to keep the leadership even if Labour suffers a humiliating defeat under his leadership.

This discussed in Claire Trevett’s revealing article in the Herald in The Cunliffe.

[The] Cunliffe says he intends to stay on if Labour is in Opposition after the election when he faces a confidence vote. His supporters agree – Tizard points to Helen Clark staying on after losing in 1996. But some former ministers say Cunliffe’s situation is different. Clark had a strong core of experienced supporters behind her, ready and able to keep caucus in line. Many of Cunliffe’s supporters are relatively new to Parliament or junior other than Nanaia Mahuta and Sue Moroney. Cunliffe names his ‘kitchen cabinet’ – the group he calls on when there is a sticky matter at hand – as David Parker, Grant Robertson and “the venerable and formidable” Annette King. None were Cunliffe supporters in the past.

This is all The CUnliffe is focussing on at the moment…oh that and skiing…as he seeks to shore up his leadership ambitions going forward.

Labour have abandoned any pretense of achieving 40% in this election and even 35%, instead The Cunliffe is now talking about being happy at or around 30%.

That is no position to attempt to pretend you can lead a government, when you can’t even command a third of the population to your way of thinking.

David Cunliffe though is seriously deluded if he thinks that he has the support that Clark had in attempting a two election strategy to gain the premiership. For a start he doesn’t have the leadership skills, and never will, that Clark had. Then there is his inherent laziness and poor planning. The Cunliffe is a classic type of person that resides in any large organisation…a shadow dweller who leaps into prominence when wins are on offer, or to claim a key role in a victory of some sort.    Read more »

Sledge of the Day

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Don’t blame Chinese for house price increases, blame Labour and people like Selwyn Pellett

Our politicians, particularly the more xenophobic of them, like to blame Johnny Foreigner for the rise in house prices.

The same is happening in Australia, with all manner of things like Chinese investors being blamed. The real reason though is somewhat different.

Labour and the Greens claim that restricting foreign investment and applying capital gains taxes will lower prices…and yet the opposite is true in Australia.

Foreign investors are not to blame for rising house prices. The real culprits are the taxing and regulating activities of Australian governments that raise the supply price of new housing.

Despite this, the House of Representatives economics committee is set to inquire into the impact of foreign investment on the Australian housing market at the instigation of Treasurer Joe Hockey.

According to committee chair Kelly O’Dwyer, the inquiry will consider whether the current restrictions on foreign investment in residential real estate serve to increase supply, as is their stated intention, or raise prices.

This is rather like asking whether foreign tourists increase the production of goods and services or raise consumer prices. The answer depends on how flexibly Australian producers can accommodate changes in foreign as well as local demand through increased output.

Fran O’Sullivan on Cunliffe and his trickiness

Fran O’Sullivan exposes David Cunliffe’s hypocrisy in her column today and the week from hell extends into the weekend.

David Cunliffe must be kicking himself he didn’t just fund his own way into the party’s top job.

The Cunliffe household – lawyer Karen Price and Opposition leader David – would pull in a combined income of at least $500,000 a year. Writing a campaign cheque for $20,000 to cover last year’s leadership campaign would not have stretched the family’s finances one iota.

Instead he had his campaign manager rattle the tin for him resulting in about $20,000 of anonymous donations being laundered through a secret trust.

Cunliffe has been battling the stench of hypocrisy since the use of a secret campaign trust to launder leadership campaign donations from five donors was disclosed.

It’s not surprising that wealthy businessmen such as Tony Gibbs and Selwyn Pellett tossed some of their chump change into Cunliffe’s leadership campaign trust.

He’s a known quantity. He’s personable. Many business people like him even if some are deeply wary about just what changes will occur under a Labour-led government because Cunliffe sometimes says one thing in public and something very different to them in private.

It’s all rather priceless.  Read more »

Dodgy Scoop Media loses Labour and Cunliffe funder; now back in control of Dotcom fanboi

dddd

Sure Bryce.

Read on:

tmtm

Getting trust is easy.  Regaining trust once it is lost not so much.

After a dreadful run-up to what should have been a fantastic start of an election year for Scoop Media, with plans to expand, take on the main news channels, and drive a stake into their online corpses, it turns out the numbers just didn’t stack up.

Statement From Scoop Media Limited Publisher Alastair Thompson

Scoop Media Ltd. regrets that an investment from Sublime Group in Scoop Media Limited will not proceed at this time.

On Monday 24 February operational control of Scoop Independent News returned to the Scoop Media Limited shareholders.

The team running Scoop has now returned to normal, Scoop Co-Founder Alastair Thompson has returned to Scoop as Publisher and Editor, Gordon Campbell continues on as Political Editor & Werewolf Editor and Lyndon Hood remains News Editor.

Scoop co-founder Alastair Thompson said today:   Read more »

Unfit for Office, how many errors of judgement can one man make?

David Cunliffe’s secret trust laundering donations is unravelling on him.

Wrong? because he got caught? If it was wrong it was wrong to start to use it not wrong now he is busted.

Error of judgement? How many is that now? This man is prone to gaffes, getting things wrong and errors of judgement. He is unfit for office.  Read more »

Corporate bludgers should hand the cash back, including Selwyn Pellett

Selwyn Pellett is rightly kicking Steven Joyce in the shins for corporate bludgers NextWindow trousering cash then selling out and winding down.

Pellett, an outspoken critic of R&D grants being awarded to foreign-owned firms, said the Government should ask Smart to return the grant funding that NextWindow had received.

“I think they’re already in a position to do that if I’ve read correctly some of the stuff [Minister for Economic Development] Steven Joyce has said,” Pellett said.

Joyce has previously said the Government could request repayment of grants in some cases, but only within three years of a funding round’s completion.

Smart did not respond to an emailed request for comment before last night’s deadline.

Pellett said the impending closure of NextWindow was part of a “continuous story” of New Zealand technology companies being sold to overseas buyers and then wound down.

Pellett might be an outspoken critic but he is also a massive hypocriteRead more »

You don’t say?

Selwyn Pellett has admitted that the fallout from Alistair Thompson’s involvement int he setting up of a political has damaged their brand:

One of the owners of online news agency Scoop says its reputation has been damaged by the involvement of its editor in the creation of Kim Dotcom’s new political party.

Editor and co-founder Alistair Thompson, registered the Internet Party’s website domain to Scoop on 18 December last year while working as a journalist in the parliamentary press gallery.

An internal party strategy document for the internet entrepreneur’s new party, leaked to blog website Whale Oil, suggests Mr Thompson could be the party’s secretary.

Mr Thompson resigned from his positions at Scoop and the press gallery late on Wednesday afternoon.

Scoop shareholder Selwyn Pellett said Mr Thompson only told him about his involvement with the new political party earlier this week.

He said the former editor’s involvement while he was in the press gallery was unwise, and Scoop now needs to restore its reputation.  Read more »

Alistair Thompson makes a liar of Selwyn Pellett, hasn’t resigned, continues to mislead media

Yesterday the media were reporting that Alistair Thompson had resigned from Scoop Media.

Parliamentary Press Gallery journalist Alastair Thompson has resigned from his role at Scoop after it was revealed that he was working for Kim Dotcom’s Internet Party.

The major owner of Scoop Media Selwyn Pellet had this to say:

Scoop Media owner Selwyn Pellett said: “We had no idea of the extent of the involvement until Cameron Slater’s blog today.

“We knew he was considering some involvement and the discussion was ‘you can’t do both jobs’. You can’t be an editor and be actively involved in Dotcom’s party.”

He added: “It is disappointing. There is no ill-feeling with Alastair. This is his passion and it is what he believes in and wants to do.”

Mr Pellett said Scoop would not be “rewriting history” by going back over Mr Thompson’s articles to check for any favourable coverage of Dotcom or his party.

“I’m not aware of what he’s written since he registered the domain name in December. But clearly he’s no longer independent on that particular subject.”

This morning however Alistair Thompson is unrepentant and laughing in the face of his former boss (or current boss as the case may be).  Read more »