Sex industry

Streamlining cock tax, Uber style app launched for hookers

The Economist reports on the launch of a new app in Germany to streamline bookings and haggling of prices with hookers.

FOR those seeking commercial sex in Berlin, Peppr, a new app, makes life easy. Type in a location and up pops a list of the nearest prostitutes, along with pictures, prices and physical particulars. Results can be filtered, and users can arrange a session for a €5-10 ($6.50-13) booking fee. It plans to expand to more cities.

Peppr can operate openly since prostitution, and the advertising of prostitution, are both legal in Germany. But even where they are not, the internet is transforming the sex trade. Prostitutes and punters have always struggled to find each other, and to find out what they want to know before pairing off. Phone-box “tart cards” for blonde bombshells and leggy señoritas could only catch so many eyes. Customers knew little about the nature and quality of the services on offer. Personal recommendations, though helpful, were awkward to come by. Sex workers did not know what risks they were taking on with clients.

Now specialist websites and apps are allowing information to flow between buyer and seller, making it easier to strike mutually satisfactory deals. The sex trade is becoming easier to enter and safer to work in: prostitutes can warn each other about violent clients, and do background and health checks before taking a booking. Personal web pages allow them to advertise and arrange meetings online; their clients’ feedback on review sites helps others to proceed with confidence.

Even in places such as America, where prostitution and its facilitation are illegal everywhere except Nevada, the marketing and arrangement of commercial sex is moving online. To get round the laws, web servers are placed abroad; site-owners and users hide behind pseudonyms; and prominently placed legalese frames the purpose of sites as “entertainment” and their content as “fiction”.

The shift online is casting light on parts of the sex industry that have long lurked in the shadows. Streetwalkers have always attracted the lion’s share of attention from policymakers and researchers because they ply their trade in public places. They are more bothersome for everyone else—and, because they are the most vulnerable, more likely to come to the attention of the police and of social or health workers. But in many rich countries they are a minority of all sex workers; just 10-20% in America, estimates Ronald Weitzer, a sociologist at George Washington University.

This could easily solve Papatoetoe’s problem with street walkers.   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo:  Channel 4 documentary My Granny The Escort

Photo: Channel 4 documentary My Granny The Escort

Meet Britain’s oldest escort

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Brings new meaning to “Always blow on the pie”

A struggling Queensland brothel has hit on a way to increase business.

No it isn’t getting better slags to work in the brothel…it is instead offering a pie and coke to go with your lunchtime root.

LADIES of the night are attempting to crack the daytime market with lunchtime meal deals offering a “pie, coke and a poke”.

An exodus of tradies to the mines has forced legal brothels to find ways of attracting new clients.

The lunch break brothel quickie fits in with a broader trend in the sex industry, with one academic revealing it is also a peak time for accessing online porn.

The midday rendezvous is also more discreet, enabling clients to duck out and still be home for the wife and kids in the evening.

One Sunshine Coast legal brothel, Scarlet Harem, is hoping to lure stressed workers away from computers and construction sites with its lunch offerings.  Read more »

Germany has become one massive brothel

While the Act candidate is wanting more “choice” for the community regarding prostitutes, the Germans are spoiled for choice as liberalisation of prostitution has turned the country into a massive brothel.

Oktoberfest may soon be renamed Root-fest.

Germany thus embarked on an experiment in liberalisation just as Sweden, a country culturally similar in many ways, was going in the opposite direction. In 1999 the Swedes had made it criminal to pay for sex (pimping was already a crime). By stigmatising not the prostitutes but the men who paid them, even putting them in jail, the Swedes hoped to come close to eliminating prostitution.  Read more »

ACT candidate not happy with the quality of Chch hookers?

The ACT candidate in the Christchurch East by-election has issued a clanger of a press release that appears to be moaning about the state of the cities hookers and demanding more choice.

ACT’s Christchurch East candidate, Gareth Veale, wants more local choice to control street prostitution.

Obviously not happy with the standard of the city’s pay per root slappers.

He says there should be “local rules for local reasons” and points out how this is already happening with alcohol. “The new liquor laws give Councils the right to produce their own Local Liquor Policy,” he says. “That proves it can be done.  Read more »

A bludgers tale

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Too afraid to face people for a job, but not to protest.

The welfare reforms have brought out all manner of bludgers to cry a tale of woe to a gullible media. Take Beau de Royce as a case in point.

“I’m going to counselling with ACC – I can’t even face people properly; I get too frightened and I hide – and yet they’re still trying to push me out into jobs”

Ok that’s understandable and could be a legitimate issue… but then the next comment is:

“I don’t want to go out pinching, I don’t want to go to jail, that’s horrible, so the only legal thing I know is prostitution.”   Read more »

Erotic Republic of Iran

They might have Mahmoud Ahmadinnerjacket in charge but Iran is really experiencing a sexual revolution rather than their ongoing Islamic revolution.

Changing attitudes toward marriage and divorce have coincided with a dramatic shift in the way Iranians approach relationships and sex. According to one study cited by a high-ranking Ministry of Youth official in December 2008, a majority of male respondents admitted having had at least one relationship with someone of the opposite sex before marriage. About 13 percent of those “illicit” relationships, moreover, resulted in unwanted pregnancy and abortion — numbers that, while modest, would have been unthinkable a generation ago. It is little wonder, then, that the Ministry of Youth’s research center has warned that “unhealthy relationships and moral degeneration are the leading causes of divorces among the young Iranian couples.”  Read more »

Iceland trying to ban sex industry

Iceland is trying to ban online pornography and the sex industry in general. Good luck with that.

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ULTRA-LIBERAL Iceland wants to ban online pornography. It is just the latest step in its attempts to eliminate the sex industry entirely. In 2009 it introduced fines and jail terms for those who patronise prostitutes (whom it treats as victims). In 2010 it outlawed strip clubs. In February the government decided to take on the glut of smut online and floated the idea of banning violent or degrading pornography, which some Icelanders take to mean most of it. No country has yet wholly succeeded in controlling commercial sex, either through legalisation or criminalisation. But all over the world, particularly in rich democracies, policymakers are watching to see whether Iceland succeeds—and may follow in its footsteps if it does.

Iceland’s proposal is in its early stages and may lose momentum after an election on April 27th, which the government is expected to lose. But its plan puts it in some odd company. Saudi Arabia similarly bans strip clubs, prostitution and pornography. But it also stops women from driving, forbids them from travelling without a man’s permission and restricts their right to vote. In the World Economic Forum’s 2012 Global Gender Gap report, which compares progress in 135 countries towards sex equality, Saudi Arabia ranked 131st.

Iceland, however, is determinedly pro-women. Half the cabinet and 25 of the 63 members of Iceland’s parliament are female. The country is run by the world’s only openly lesbian prime minister. Iceland is also pro-sex. Its supermarkets sell condoms and mini-vibrators next to checkouts. A new sex-education film informs teenagers that sex should be something they want to do again and again, and then maybe again. Some 65% of Icelandic children are born outside marriage, more than any other country in the OECD. Same-sex marriage has been legal since 2010 and gays and lesbians can adopt children. Icelandair ran a campaign featuring the tagline, “Fancy a dirty weekend in Iceland?”

The country’s initiatives against the sex industry have been championed by a powerful feminist movement. “Tackling online porn, particularly the violent kind, is part of a broader set of policies to protect children and reduce sexual violence,” says Halla Gunnarsdottir, a political adviser to the interior minister who has proposed the law. But the more ambitious Iceland has become in its war against the sex industry, the less success it seems to enjoy.

Bizzare. They came for the strip clubs first…

Did Farrar cause Ron Jeremy’s health scare?

Obviously David Farrar’s hurty arse and the mention of Ron Jeremy are connected to the hospitalisation of the porn star with an aneurysm…I can see it can’t you:

Cult porn star Ron Jeremy is in a critical condition in hospital after being treated for an aneurysm near his heart.

Jeremy, 59, who is perhaps the adult film industry’s best known faces, checked himself into Cedars-Sinai hospital in Los Angeles after experiencing severe chest pain.  Read more »

I bet he was registered when he paid a teenager to have sex with his 16-year-old girlfriend, while he watched.

The various teacher union oppose Charter Schools because they say the teachers won’t be required to be registered. They reckon kids will be at risk.

I’ll bet this teacher was registered when he was offending:

A former Tauranga teacher paid a teenager to have sex with his 16-year-old girlfriend, while he watched.

Andrew Loader, 49, pleaded guilty to a charge under the Prostitution Reform Act 2003 in Tauranga District Court today, the Sunlive website reported.

A charge of paying a 16-year-old for sexual services was withdrawn and replaced with one of contract sex with a person under 18.

Loader paid the man, who was in a consensual sexual relationship with the girl, to have sex while he watched. He was remanded on bail for sentencing on March 15.  Read more »