Shayne Currie

Journalists relying on criminals to do their reporting for them

While Matt Nippert and David ‘Tainted’ Fisher are lapping up the adulation of the script kiddies in Wellington there is yet another article about the failure of journalistic ethics, where it appears that journalists are quite happy to rely on criminals to their reporting for them.

These so-called investigative journalists are even still in touch with the hacker of my emails (if tweets from the Kiwicon are accurate)…so much for their journalistic integrity and they claims at being investigative journalists.

Ryan Holiday, someone knows a thing or two about manipulating the media, writes about the media’s strategy of relying on criminals to do their reporting for them.

At first, I thought the media response to the celebrity hacking scandal was sanctimonious. Now I realize it was rank hypocrisy. Just shameless, awful hypocrisy from a group hardly better than the criminals they enable.

Because after every outlet, from Perez Hilton to Jezebel, called the hack, leak and publishing of nude photos of celebrities, including Kate Upton and Jennifer Lawrence, a crime, none of them seem to have any problem publishing the spoils of the Sony hack, particularly the many private conversations of its co-chairman Amy Pascal.

As Marc Andreessen put it on Twitter last week: “Hackers steal a company’s email files. No bad acts by company revealed. Press prints emails. Journalism, or federal crime?”

That’s exactly right. It’s the question we should be asking here.

How on earth do all these outlets—including The New York Times no less—justify printing or covering the contents of private emails obtained through clearly criminal acts? And not only that, but many in the media consider it real journalism and, in one case, criticize Sony for “choosing to stay silent” for months before telling anyone they’d been a victim?

“There’s really no other way to explain the horrifying lack of empathy so many of them show, time and time again, when women of all levels of fame are treated like they exist to be bullied and mocked.”

Well put, Jezebel. It makes it extra ironic that your boss, Nick Denton actually wrote a memo to Gawker’s staff in which he lauded the publishing of the Sony emails and said “that’s how good our editorial can be every day.” Really? That’s how good? Not: That’s how low we’re willing to stoop. This is the same guy who spoke last year about wanting to have a company people were proud to work at. These are the same people who criticized the supposed bullying tactics of #GamerGate, even though what they do is just as bad.

Read more »

Braunias has a new book, and I’m in it, but the cheap bastard never sent me one

Steve Braunias is a good bastard, for a pinko scumbag I really like the guy.

I’ve probably ruined his lefty credentials now, but hey…who cares.

The other night he launched his book called Madmen: Inside the weirdest election campaign ever.

I had to laugh at the name of his publisher, Steve obviously got his inspiration for the name from my good friend Brian Edwards.

God knows where you can buy the book, but if you track it down enjoy the read…the cheap bastard didn’t even send me one despite the fact I’m in it!

I emailed Braunias too…which he loosely outlined in a blog post.Madmen

Following last night’s wildly successful book launch at the Auckland Central Library for Madmen: Inside the Weirdest Election Campaign Ever – 100 people in attendance, including Cactus Kate, Guyon Espiner, a homeless man in a top hat, Ant Timpson, Shayne Carter, two elderly people in advanced stages of dementia, Deborah Hill-Cone, Karl Puschmann, a man who displayed a dozen pieces of paper which he had thrown coffee onto, waited til the stains dried, and presented them as art, Gary Steel, Shayne Currie, Toby Manhire, Miriamo Kamo and her adorable three-year-old daughter, etc  – I came home to find an email from Whale Oil.

Actually, just to correct Steve and look for Nicky Hager, Cactus Kate went along.  Braunias confronted her at the entrance and said he didn’t invite her to which she replied “we often get what we don’t ask for” and proceed to sashay in the door to find the bar.  Nicky was nowhere in sight.

That is when all hell broke loose.    Read more »

My Good Friend Brian Edwards passed judgment on the NZ Herald

My Good Friend Brian Edwards seems a bit curmudgeonly these days. Perhaps the butcher has run out of good luncheon sausage?

Anyway MGFBE has passed judgement on the NZ Herald and found them…ermmm…wanting.

Under the editorship of Shayne Currie the New Zealand Herald has been transformed from a quality newspaper into little better than a trash tabloid.

I need to be a little more precise here. Mr Currie has responsibility primarily for the Monday-to-Friday Herald and it is to those editions that my remarks apply.   Read more »

Bylined, photo, you’d think she had the idea all by herself [UPDATED]

See this article in the NZ Herald yesterday:

Herald-plagiarism

Gee, Rhonwyn Newson is an editor and all.

Then let’s see who is credited with the story at the bottom of the article.

herald-plagiarism2

Right…so the Herald and Rhonwyn Newson have claimed this article as their own work.    Read more »

Face of the day

Shayne Currie

Shayne Currie

Shayne Currie is my face of the day. He is the man at the top The NZ Herald and it is fair to say that the buck stops with him.

If his staff lie in articles the buck stops with him.

If they defame people in attack articles the buck stops with him.

If they attempt to undermine inquires the buck stops with him.
If they do anything totally outrageous like I don’t know… deliberately putting an innocent man’s face in an article about public masturbation, then he is totally responsible.

Read more »

The lies by omission and inference of a tainted journalist [UPDATED]

David “Tainted” Fisher has let his personal hatred of me cloud his judgement. Perhaps he thought he could get away with it because his editor, Shayne Currie, is on leave.

He has written a piece on the NZ Herald site yesterday that has so many errors in it it could almost be called a work of fiction. The NZ Herald has already had to correct it twice, but I’ve thought overnight about the most outrageous claims by David Fisher and decided I couldn’t let it stand.

“Tainted” Fisher wrote this:

Blomfield had fought off the attacker, fiercely enough that police later found blood from which they took DNA.

He struggled to think who might want him hurt, or worse. In the end, he came up with a suspect list of 285,000 people – the monthly readership of the Whaleoil blog, who he believed had been given every reason to think he was one of the worst people in New Zealand.

So David Fisher, and his subject, have decided by inference that the person who attacked Mr Blomfield must have been one of you. You should feel outraged by this…not just by the inference but by the fact that David Fisher, and his subject, know who the attacker was, there was DNA evidence after all, and they also know that the attacker has been in custody since July.  His details are displayed on the Police website, including what he has been charged with and when he was arrested.  Read more »

Do disclaimers on native advertising work?

As the NZ Herald and Fairfax move to extend their already considerable investment in native advertising, the advertising made to look like journalism, there is growing evidence that their disclaimers don’t work.

The disclaimers are what news executives like Tim Murphy and Shayne Currie use to justify their extension of native advertising.

While publishers are producing and running sponsored content in greater numbers, one thing they haven’t figured out is how to effectively label their output. Some publishers are particularly overt about it, while others are content with making readers work a little bit harder. And no one’s quite sure which approach works best.

The real challenge is that a lot of those disclosures may not be all that effective. A new study from analytics platform Nudge found that the most common native ad disclosures are actually the least effective at helping readers identify their content as ads. Sponsored content using disclosure techniques like the home page buyout (used, for example, by The Wall Street Journal) and the persistent disclosure banner (used by Slate) were only identified as ads by readers 29 percent of the time.

In contrast, Nudge found that over half of the 100 people it polled were able to to identify ads that featured disclosures within the content itself. In-content disclosures are rare compared to the other techniques, though.

Nudge’s conclusion: Some publishers may be going out of their way to label sponsored content, but readers are barely noticing them, thanks to banner blindness and small labeling. Ben Young, CEO of Nudge, said that this is more than publishers staying honest in the eyes of the FTC. Bad disclosure can actually hurt brands, too. “Effective disclosures mean effective brand recall,” he said.

[…]    Read more »

Don’t panic Mr Mainwaring, don’t paniiiic!

Last night’s poll has been a bit of a downer for those on the right.  People have been quick to point out that the Dirty Politics damage is only now starting to show through.

But it might just be useful to remind you that one poll doesn’t make an election result.   One of the ways to look at it, is to check Curia’s Poll of Polls – the one where the most recent poll results are averaged.  First, how it was before last night’s poll came out:

wqwe

Read more »

Random Impertinent Questions

Which senior Labour MP is currently residing at SkyCity rather than waste his time campaigning in an electorate where he considers the voters to be disinterested, feral and a waste of time.

What does David Cunliffe think of his living arrangements?

Doesn’t Labour hate SkyCity?

What would the CCTV footage at SkyCity show?

 

Which NZ Herald “decent journalist, trained and skilled” arranged to have another Herald “decent journalist, trained and skilled” in court to soften up the opponents of her boyfriend?

Which NZ Herald journalist didn’t declare the relationship of the columnist in his hit piece in the Herald?

Why didn’t the journalist mention that the boyfriend’s sub-tenant had to vacate rapidly after a positive test to meth came up in testing of the cottage on the property?

Does Shayne Currie know what went on?

Would he like to read about it here?

 

Which other political party has an arrangement or deal on the sly with Kim Dotcom?

How do they think they will be able to keep it all secret?

When are the other Labour politicians going to fess up to cuddling Kim?

Herald busted manufacturing immigration story

This morning the NZ Herald ran a story by Jared Savage.

Investigations by WOBH can reveal that the Herald has sat on this story since October 2013.

A wealthy Auckland businessman was given New Zealand citizenship against official advice after a Government minister lobbied the colleague who made the decision.

Maurice Williamson, the Minister of Building and Construction, and Prime Minister John Key then opened the first stage of a $70 million construction project launched by the Chinese-born developer after he became a citizen.

The following year, one of his companies made a $22,000 donation to the National Party.

The Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) recommended that the citizenship application of Donghua Liu be declined on the grounds that he did not spend enough time in New Zealand or meet English language criteria.

At first blush this looks bad, but is it?

Well not really. Some pertinent facts have been left out from the story.

For a start there is nothing wrong with the Minister of Immigration or Internal Affairs exercising discretion – it is their right to do so is and it is written into the legislation. Members of Parliament advocate for that discretion to be used constantly, and in some famous cases like Taito Phillip Field used as a matter of course by Labour’s immigration ministers.

But in order to obtain citizenship you must first have permanent residency, which is a much harder barrier to overcome. Read more »