socialism

How thick are Labour?

Andrew Little has fed a story to their embedded gallery journalist Vernon Small about the requirements for a new chief press secretary.

Expect to see Labour leader Andrew Little in a good light on the 6pm television news – or questions to be asked at the top of his media unit.

Little is advertising for a new chief press secretary to head the party’s media and communications strategy, and the successful applicant is expected to ensure Little appears “in a positive story on the 6pm news at least twice a week”.

Other key targets put emphasis on social media, including 100,000 “likes” for the party’s Facebook page, up from about 38,000 now, and 40,000 “likes” for Little’s Facebook page by the 2017 election. It currently boasts 10,422 “likes”.

Little’s new spin doctor will also be expected to increase Labour’s email contact list to 200,000 by the 2017 general election, from about 87,000 now.

How dumb is that?

This just shows that Labour has learned nothing from the past 6 years. For two elections now they have touted their fantastic ground game, their dominance of social media and even rolled in David Talbot to advise them on this stuff…all to no avail and with results the reverse of what was predicted. How he could even bill Labour for such a losing strategy is beyond me.

What these chumps have not realised is that Facebook likes does NOT equal votes. Slacktivism or Clicktivism is called that for a reason…useless big talking internet warriors who don’t translate the click of their mouse into actions on the ground.    Read more »

Remember showerheads and lightbulbs?

Remember Clark with the help of the Greens wanting to legislate your life to the point where you would be prevented from having a “wasteful” shower?

It seems the Europeans never managed to throw similar bureaucrats out.

They’ve already banned powerful vacuum cleaners and outlawed traditional lightbulbs.

Now Brussels has come up with a new way to force us to save energy – and it will be particularly hard to swallow for coffee lovers.

EU bureaucrats want our new percolators to switch off automatically within five minutes of brewing.

New measures came into effect yesterday which demand that everything from computer modems to ‘smart’ televisions must have the ability to go into standby mode if no task is performed for several minutes.

Although coffee machines bought at Christmas are likely to be exempt from the ruling, new ones must meet the stringent EU energy regulations.

As with vacuum cleaners, it is understood shops can still sell the old models while stocks last.

But it could prompt another retail frenzy as people rush to snap up percolators that do not go on standby after several minutes.

Yes.  Coffee percolators that are forced to not keep your coffee warm by turning off after two minutes, and vacuum cleaners that aren’t allowed to be powerful enough to suck dust from your carpet.   Read more »

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If Andrew Little started using these words I would be concerned

The porridge wogs in Labour have elected a new leader.

Jim Murphy is the new leader of the Scottish Labour party.

And he is using bloody interesting language for a Labour leader.

Mr Murphy said the best way to tackle poverty was to boost the economy.

“The most effective anti poverty measure is a successful economy,” he said.    Read more »

Watch Labour push youth voting here

Ed Miliband is promising to give 16 year olds the vote in the UK.

Labour here has hinted at the same policy, and I remember a soft push along these lines.

But if Miliband succeeds in the UK then watch them push it here.

Sixteen and 17-year-olds will be allowed to vote within a year of the next election, Labour leader Ed Miliband pledged last night.

Mr Miliband said the government would change the law to lower the voting age from May 2016.

Such a move – the first change in the national voting age since 1969 – would enfranchise more than 1.5million 16 and 17-year-olds. It comes after the voting age was lowered for the first time in the Scottish referendum in September.

During a YouTube debate Mr Miliband said: ‘Too many young people are turning their backs on politics which is bad for our country and bad for them too.

‘That’s because too often young people don’t get a look-in with politicians who know they can’t vote – or assume that they won’t vote.

‘The measures we will introduce in our first year of government represent the greatest extension of the franchise in my lifetime.

‘But it is not enough just to give young people the right to vote. We must do everything we can to ensure they have the chance to exercise it.’   Read more »

Some words of caution for Andrew Little and Labour, but will they listen?

Tony Alexander, in his latest newsletter, has some words of caution for Andrew Little and the Labour party about the path they have embarked on.

Last week I noted that there are some trends which people (businesses I suppose, truth be told) should keep an eye on. These included growing wealth inequality and employers exploiting staff. Perhaps this latter thread is one of the motivating factors behind the new Leader of the Opposition’s announcement that he will set up a two year “Future of Work Commission”. The intention is that this project will examine changes in the way people work via numerous workshops and extensive contact with various groups. The risk is that it ends
up being a grumpy free for all for all and sundry so the first task of the work which Grant Robertson will lead is to tightly define what they wish specifically to focus on and go from there.

Good luck to them because one outcome of the GFC is an altered relationship between employers and employees. But more than that whole new industries and jobs have appeared, there is more casualisation and contracting, and a generation of people have come through the education system and entered the workforce with minimal awareness of what unions can offer them. And that union movement suffers greatly from being associated with exactly that – a politically motivated always Labour-supporting “movement” rather than true representation of employee concerns.

These are early days for the re-elected National government and early days for the latest Labour Party leader, so the thrust of changes in the employee-employer relationship for the next three years is still likely to be in the direction of further empowering the former. But employers should keep an eye on the building undercurrent of discontent among the working poor in particular, what the Aussies call the “battlers”, and where possible seek input into the new Commission.

Read more »

How does the common good get served without socialism?

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Avatar / Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation, Dune Entertainment, Ingenious Film Partners

One of our new commenters, who signed off as “26 and wondering” left this on a video post last night where it wouldn’t have had the exposure it deserves

Collective humans:

I am as far away from socialism and communism that you can throw me at this stage of my life. I am not earning mega bucks. I am not a trust fund baby. I am paying my way happily in the knowledge if I keep going I will be sweet. I genuinely hold the belief that you should take control of your life.

HOWEVER. Read more »

Understanding Leftese [VIDEO]

Andrew Klavan explains some leftwing phrases…the sort of phrases that Labour politicians and their dwindling number of supporters like to use.

Words like “progressive” and “smart” as in “smart power”.

Let’s start with the word “Progressive.”  Progressive is a term used to refer to things like cancer or emphysema or leftism — or indeed anything that slowly destroys whatever it touches.  In political history, the term progressive replaced the term liberal when people realized liberalism didn’t work.  Liberal had replaced the term leftist when leftism didn’t work.  And leftist had replaced the term socialist when socialism didn’t work.  Socialist, of course, had replaced the term progressive.

Used as a noun, a Progressive is someone who believes that mankind progresses and becomes more civilized over time. Examples of progress can be found throughout history. For instance, the Roman Empire was militaristic and imperialistic but humanity finally progressed beyond it into a thousand years of darkness and savagery.  Or there was the Victorian era of sexual repression and racial chauvinism until we finally progressed into the glorious mass slaughter of World Wars, Holocaust and Communism.  And then we got the iPhone so…  you just have to be patient.

Read more »

Every state house is a sacred state house?

Phil Twyford explaining why the derelict state house behind him should be kept for eternity.

Phil Twyford explaining why the derelict state house behind him should be kept for eternity.

At the moment the National led government is looking at selling some state houses.

You’d think the world and caved in on itself if you listened to the Labour party.

They are invoking asset sales because in their world if even a single house is sold that is an asset sale.

Presumably they will also be protesting about the Ministry of Education’s Surplus Property Disposal Incentive Scheme where schools are encouraged to “release surplus school property to the Ministry of Education for disposal through the Surplus Property Disposal Incentive Scheme (SPDIS).”

Surplus property is surely just another word for assets?

When you think about it the mere suggestion that because something is owned by the government it can never be sold, even when tried, worn out or simply in the wrong place for modern times.

Society changes as do our preferences and the way we live. But for some reason the Labour party thinks that we should forever remain stuck in the heydays of state housing in the 40s and 50s, with every citizen hankering after a state house.   Read more »

This could so easily describe NZ Labour

Ed Miliband is dead set useless.

He is about to lead the Labour party to a stunning and crushing defeat in Scotland at the hands of the Scottish National Party.

Ed Miliband’s hopes of become Britain’s next Prime Minister suffered a serious setback today as a new poll suggested Labour is facing political annihilation at the hands of the SNP in its Scottish heartlands.

The survey, by Ipsos Mori, found Labour is currently polling at just 23 per cent in Scotland which, if replicated in May, would see the party lose all but four of the 41 MPs it currently has north of the border.

Such a result would make it next to impossible for Labour to win an overall majority in Westminster and form a Government after the next election.  Read more »

Guest Post – Douglas wrong about National

A guest post from Lindsay Mitchell.


Making some otherwise sound recommendations to his old party, Labour, Sir Roger Douglas made this statement:

 “National’s do-nothing, status-quo approach to economic and social policy provides Labour with a real opportunity to get back up on its feet.”

In the last six years National has done more to address working-age welfare dependence than Labour did in the prior nine.

A Labour supporter would reject my claim on the basis that numbers on the unemployment benefit took a nosedive over their incumbency. That’s true. Work and Income put enormous effort into those on an unemployment benefit, and Labour luckily oversaw an economic boom (giving them full credit for which is as questionable as blaming National for the GFC.)

But chronic welfare dependence, a crippling social and economic issue for New Zealand, lies in the other main benefits:  pre-reform they were the DPB  and Sickness/Invalid benefits combined.

In 2009, National set up the Welfare Working Group, and from there, commissioned the Taylor Fry actuarial work which exposed where long-term reliance is concentrated. The revelation that teen parents and other young beneficiaries entering the system at 16 or 17 would stay there the longest was no surprise.

Through the early 2000s, while only 2-3 percent of the DPB total at any given time was teenagers, between a third and a half of all recipients had begun on welfare aged under twenty. Throughout Labour’s administration I argued that average stays on welfare were much longer than government issued figures. Point-in-time data produces much longer averages than data collected over a period of time, but it suited Labour politically to use the latter data to minimise average stays and downplay dependence.

To understand this statistical phenomena imagine a hospital ward with 10 beds. Nine are occupied year around by chronically ill patients; one is occupied on a weekly basis. At any point-in-time 9 patients have an average stay of 12 months and one, an average stay of one week. But calculated over the year, 85 percent of total patients had an average stay of just 1 week. Equate this to spells on welfare and you can see how long-term dependence can be disguised.

Here is the huge difference between National and Labour.

National looked for what Labour had denied.   Read more »