South Africa

Photo of the Day

Bamangwato tribal chief Seretse Khama w. his white British wife Ruth, on hill overlooking native huts in the tribal capital of Bechuanaland from which the British Commonwealth officials wish to remove him for marrying a white woman.

Bamangwato tribal chief Seretse Khama with his white British wife Ruth, on hill overlooking native huts in the tribal capital of Bechuanaland from which the British Commonwealth officials wished to remove him for marrying a white woman.

Forbidden Love

The Bride wore Black

A love affair between an English bank clerk and an African chieftain provoked panic amongst post-war British colonial officials who schemed to have the couple exiled.

The enduring love affair between a black man and a white woman began one summer night in gloomy, rationed postwar Britain. But this was no ordinary man, nor indeed any ordinary woman. He was Seretse Khama, the heir to the kingship of the largest tribe of an African protectorate under British control; she was Ruth Williams, a 23-year-old clerk in a shipping company, and a conservative, with a small and large c.

The love story of Seretse and Ruth defines an era of dying colonial power. Stymied in their relationship at every turn by the British government, in covert alliance with apartheid South Africa, the dignity of Khama and his strong-willed bride came to represent the emerging freedoms and racial tolerance of Africa as a whole.

The young Khama was sent over to London in 1945 to study law by his uncle, the Regent of the Bangwato tribe to which Seretse was heir. Lonely at first in the chill world of Oxford, he moved to London, where he met several other politically minded young Africans; and then met Ruth, at a dinner dance, in June 1947. Within months, the couple were engaged.

Almost immediately, the young mixed-race couple faced trouble. They were plagued by racist landlords and casual abuse in the streets. British government officials, family friends and church figures tried to prevent the marriage. On their first attempt to wed in a Kensington Church it was blocked by the Bishop of London, and the person who was meant to marry the pair was told in no uncertain terms he should not officiate at the wedding. The ceremony didn’t go ahead, but the couple managed to marry secretly at a registry office, four days later.

The bride wore a black suit.

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All Blacks vs Springboks

Reuters / via Telegraph

Reuters / via Telegraph

Hi fellow multi-screening tragics.  This is our post for the night.  Just respect the people in Backchat – no rugby talk, no scores, no final result.  Not even when the game is over, just in case someone’s watching later.

Bragging rights are back up for grabs:  get your scores in before the game starts.

Caring Liberals open their hearts and home to refugees

Two caring South African liberals matched their words to their actions and opened their farm up to hundreds of refugees fleeing violence. Called Angels by the media, they never expected that the families that they helped would repay them in the way that they did.

This story is a wake up call for all us hard-hearted conservatives who want to tightly control the numbers of refugees and immigrants into our own countries.

idiots
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Savages!

Imagine the social media outrage if this happened today?

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Cry Baby of the Week

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Some people really need to learn to shut their gobs instead of running off to the Media Party and crying a river of tears about their self-inflicted predicament.

A family ripped apart after a relative was deported from New Zealand says Australia is not the only country treating people inhumanely.

South African-born accountant Gavin Jardine was kicked out of the country in September after serving more than three years in prison for stealing $380,000 from his employer.

A New Zealand resident since May 2008, Jardine appealed his deportation on the grounds his wife and children, who were oblivious to his offending, were settled in the country.

But his appeal was dismissed by the Immigration and Protection Tribunal, who said the Jardine family’s circumstances were “not exceptional” and they could keep in touch through the phone and internet.

Kiwis being sent home after committing crimes in Australia have been making headlines, but scores of people are kicked out of New Zealand as well each year.

Figures provided under the Official Information Act show that 447 people from 54 different countries were deported after committing a crime between 2010 and August this year.

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AB v SA / RWC2015 / Semi Final

Photo-from-All-Blacks

If you are up early enough, and want to chat with each other, as we do… this is the post for you.

Go the ABs!

Photo Of The Day

King George V presents the King's Cup to James Ryan, captain of the New Zealand Services Rugby Team, after the team's win in the Inter-Services Tournament at Twickenham rugby ground, London in 1919. Major General Charles William Melvill and another officer look on. The team some of whom have fern leaf emblems on their jerseys are standing in a line. A film cameraman appears in the background. Photograph taken April 1919 by Thomas Frederick Scales.

King George V presents the King’s Cup to James Ryan, captain of the New Zealand Services Rugby Team, after the team’s win in the Inter-Services Tournament at Twickenham rugby ground, London in 1919. Major General Charles William Melvill and another officer look on. The team some of whom have fern leaf emblems on their jerseys are standing in a line. A film cameraman appears in the background. Photograph taken April 1919 by Thomas Frederick Scales.

The Forgotten Story of

The First Ever ‘World Cup’

 In 1919, in the aftermath of WWI, a group of international rugby teams gathered in Britain for The King’s Cup, a tournament unprecedented in its time but little remembered today. Some rugby historians have dubbed The King’s Cup as the ‘First Rugby World Cup Tournament.’

On October 31, the two finalists of the 2015 Rugby World Cup will take to the hallowed turf of Twickenham for what will be the finale of, officially at least, the 8th edition of a tournament that began in 1987. But on the same pitch on April 19, 1919 – some 96 years ago – military teams representing New Zealand and Great Britain faced off in the final of what, for all intents and purposes, was a World Cup in all but name: The King’s Cup.

Along with the two finalists, military teams from Canada, Australia and South Africa took part, as well as an RAF side made up of players from various nations. It was a gathering of international rugby talent that had never been seen before.

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Even the Commonwealth games doesn’t want road maggots

Everyone is sick of the lycra clad road maggots, even the Commonwealth Games…in this case track maggots.

Track cycling is at risk of being dropped from the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Durban unless more money is made available to build a new velodrome in South Africa.

Track cycling has been a regular fixture on the Commonwealth Games programme since 1934 but remains an optional sport and South African officials say it could be omitted for 2022.

Durban, which was named on Wednesday as the first African city to host the Commonwealth Games, does not have a velodrome, and South African officials want the International Cycling Union (UCI) to contribute to the cost of building one.

“I met the president of the International Cycling Union and told him that if he wanted track cycling at 2022 then he needed to come to the party and help us build a velodrome,” the Commonwealth Games Federation vice-president Gideon Sam said.

“We cannot afford to build a facility that will cost us millions and not be used.”    Read more »

How to nobble a sports team with political correctness

If you want to stuff up a top sports team then set arbitrary rules based on something like race or sex and then watch as your team falls apart.

A South African political party has taken the South African Rugby Union to court in a move that could see the Springboks miss the Rugby World Cup.

The Agency for New Agenda (ANA) party is seeking an order in a Pretoria court this week that would force players and officials to surrender their passports, the Guardian reports.

The ANA are protesting the fact that the Springboks squad doesn’t have enough black players which doesn’t meet the South African government’s policy on transformation.  Read more »

A Green I could vote for

Ben-Wightman-posin_3420450b

There aren’t many Green candidates whom I could support, but this is one of them.

Ben Wightman, 27, posts picture of himself next to two dead antelopes, a warthog, an ostrich, wildebeest and a zebra.

A former Green Party councillor has defended his love of big game hunting.

Ben Wightman, 27, posted on Facebook photos of himself next to a series of animals he has shot in South Africa.

The dead animals next to him include two antelopes, a warthog, an ostrich, wildebeest and zebra. He also has the heads of dead animals and other trophies on the walls of his home.   Read more »

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