South Korea

Multiple fake text messages. How can this happen?

I can’t get my head around this

Text messages purporting to be sent from missing school children trapped aboard the sunken South Korean ferry are fake, police have revealed.

In the wake of the disaster on Wednesday, text messages apparently from high school children were sent to their parents on dry land.

But, having given their distressed parents hope for their missing offspring, the messages have now been revealed to be fakes.

The Korea Herald reported the messages cannot be legitimate after an analysis of phone records showed none of the students had used their phones since the ferry flipped over.

The ferry Sewol sank off South Korea’s southern coast on Wednesday morning.

One of the text messages, sent in the aftermath of the disaster as rescue efforts got underway, was sent by a student only identified as Shin, 18.

It said: ‘Dad, don’t worry. I’ve got a life vest on and we’re huddled together.’

Her father replied: ‘I know the rescue is underway but make your way out if you can.’

He received the response: ‘Dad, I can’t walk out… The corridor is full of kids and it’s too tilted,’ the New York Post reported.

So as I read it, these were multiple messages from multiple children.  That means someone needed access to their family’s phone numbers.  Receiving the text messages, the family believed them to be genuine – this appears to me that they were “from” the correct phone numbers.  The father replied and get another response.

What’s really going on?

Police said all messages claiming to have been sent from the Sewol after it went down appear to have been fabricated, reported the Herald.

Officers would not comment on the messages reported to have been sent in the morning as the ship was still sinking, many of which contained video and photos showing the boat going down.

Investigators at South Korea’s Cyber Terror Repsonse Center, part of the National Police Agency said they found none of the phones analysed had been used since noon on the day of the accident.

‘We’ve checked over 300 phones, since some people owned more than one phone,’ police said.

One sham message was sent from a phone owned by a fifth-grader in Gimpo, Gyeonggi Province, the Herald reports.

Police said the hoax is distressing for the families of the missing, adding that those responsible face criminal charges.

Can you come up with a scenario that explains all this?  With the exception that the authorities are lying about none of the phones having been used since the capsize.

I mean, how realistic is that?   None.

What are they trying to cover up, and what is really going on here?

Perhaps Gareth Morgan should take note of this

Gareth Morgan famously rode his motorcycle through the Potemkin villages of NOrth Korea, proclaiming the whole country to be enlightened and not as reported outside of the country.

The man is an idiot. There is ample evidence of the lack of freedom and deprivations suffered by the people of North Korea under the Kim regime.

Yeonmi Park spoke to Australia’s SBS about her defection from North Korea.

I lived in North Korea for the first 15 years of my life, believing Kim Jong-il was a god. I never doubted it because I didn’t know anything else. I could not even imagine life outside of the regime.

It was like living in hell. There were constant power outages, so everything was dark. There was no transportation – everyone had to walk everywhere. It was very dirty and no one could eat anything.

It was not the right conditions for human life, but you couldn’t think about it, let alone complain about it. Even though you were suffering, you had to worship the regime every day.

I had to be careful of my thoughts because I believed Kim Jong-il could read my mind. Every couple of days someone would disappear. A classmate’s mother was punished in a public execution that I was made to attend. I had no choice – there were spies in the neighbourhood.

My father worked for the government, so for a while things were relatively OK for me compared with some others in North Korea. But my father was accused of doing something wrong and jailed for three years. He being guilty made me guilty too, so whatever future I had in North Korea completely disappeared. I could no longer go to university, and my family was forced to move out of Pyongyang to the countryside on the border close to China.

After a few years, my father became very sick with cancer and he came out of jail for treatment. During this time, we decided to leave North Korea.

We had to cross a frozen river in the middle of winter to sneak across the border into China. I was very scared – not of being caught but of being shot. If they see someone escaping, they don’t ask, they just shoot them.  Read more »

Kim Jong-un kills uncle’s entire family

Kim Jong-un is fast getting the reputation for being madder than his father, and that is saying something.

Team America might have to do a sequel at this rate.

It is being reported that he has now executed his uncle’s entire family, firmly cementing his reputation as a ruthless dictator.

The direct relatives of Jang Song Thaek, Kim Jong-un’s recently executed uncle, have all been put to death upon the orders of the North Korean leader, it was reported yesterday

Entire families closely related to Jang, who was purged by the Pyongyang regime in December for allegedly plotting its overthrow, were executed including children and grandchildren, “multiple sources” told South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency.

Among those allegedly executed were Jon Yong-jin, Jang’s brother-in-law and the country’s ambassador to Cuba, and Jang Yong-chol, Jang’s nephew and ambassador to Malaysia, the anonymous sources said.  Read more »

Re-post – Some perspective on Whaling

I originally posted this in 2010. Given the Labour party thinks they speak for all New Zealand upset over a few Minke whales getting harpooned and the fact that the media accept pirates as a valid source of news, I thought I’d repost these rather inconvenient facts that the anti-whaling crowd wouldn’t want you to know.

arpaobaleia

The world’s meddlers gnash their teeth over whaling whether it is for scientific purposes or for commercial. Right now the moratorium on commercial whaling isn’t working and just over 1500 whales were harvested last year in whaling activities and 31,084 in total since the moratorium began in 1986. Those figures sound horrendous. I am of course using the WWF figures and we all know how accurate and peer reviewed their information is. An independent assessment done by the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society (they must be good, they have the word conservation in their title) says that “Iceland, Norway, and Japan – have brutally slaughtered over 25,000 whales under the guise of scientific research and for commercial purposes”. Note their overly emotive language. They were harvested, as we know, not brutally slaughtered. To use that terminology I would hate to think how they consider the Beef  industry. Somewhere between those numbers lies the truth.   Read more »

Map of the Day

North Korea at night

North and South Korea at Night

Saturday nightCap

Shouldn’t have listened to Gareth

These are the dangers of listening to mad people on motorbikes…some people take them seriously.

South Korean troops fired “hundreds” of rounds at a man who was killed while trying to swim across the border to North Korea, a top army officer says.

In the first official press briefing since the highly unusual incident on Monday, Brigadier General Cho Jong-Sul defended the border guards’ actions, saying they had followed the correct protocol.

Nam Yong-Ho, a 47-year-old South Korean man, was fatally shot at around 2.30PM (5.30PM NZST) while trying to swim across the Imjin river that makes up part of the western border with the North.

Cho said soldiers manning a nearby guard post had repeatedly shouted warnings at Nam to turn back, but he ignored them.

The commander of the unit then ordered his men to open fire, and 30 of them discharged their weapons.

“Several hundred shots were fired,” Cho said.   Read more »

I wonder what Gareth thinks of this

Gareth Morgan is proving himself to be a friend of dictators after his short and supervised journey through North Korea.

I wonder then what he has to say about this news.

A SOUTH Korean man has escaped four decades after he was kidnapped by North Korea while fishing near the disputed Yellow Sea border, officials say.

The 68-year-old, identified as Jeon Wook-Pyo, made it to Seoul recently after escaping from North Korea in early August, a government official said.

“He is now under investigation by security authorities,” the official said, declining to give details.

South Korean says more than 500 of its citizens – most of them fishermen – have been abducted by North Korea in the 60 years since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War.  Read more »

Gareth Morgan v Liberty Scott

Gareth Morgan is incensed that his view of North Korea has been challenged. He specifically singles out Liberty Scott for some treatment, calling him ignorant.

As you will see it is Morgan who comes off looking ignorant.

Liberty you are ignorant.

My concern is the 25 million Koreans suffering because of this 68 year impasse. The relevant question is whether it is the only way or can we be smarter. I am not supporting the authoritarian regime of North Korea’s or that in Russia (Pussy Riot) or that in China or for that matter, that in Singapore. What I’m saying is that the US as leader of liberal democracies has normal relations with totalitarian regimes when it suits them but push for “regime change” through crazy talk like the vacuous “Axis of Evil” accusation, and demonising the DPRK regime when they sniff the possibility of engineering a Saddam-like collapse. I think it’s called double standards.
I do not see it as defensible to punish 25 million people for a totalitarian regime they are powerless to change. The only way to effect sustainable change is contact, demonstration and persuasion. Not isolation, escalation and humiliation. The DPRK’s reinstigation of its nuclear programme is a direct result of provocation – it’s terrified the US is going to invade it.You need to think more.

Get it?  Read more »

He’s so ronery he needs a troll army

North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un must have inherited the roneriness of his father, he has recruited a troll army of over 3000.

North Korea has put together a team of 3,000 cyber warriors as part of attempts to build support for the regime of leader Kim Jong-Un and destabilize its enemies, according to a South Korean think tank.

The hackers include 200 agents who post anti-South Korean comments online to try to demoralise the population of the neighbouring country.  Read more »