State school

PPTA President Loves Education that brings Systemic Failure of the Poor

Angela-Roberts

In a “my job is tough please cry me a river” article PPTA President Angela Roberts closes by stating:

Public education is important for a nation. We have a great system in New Zealand and these challenges come about so we can improve our great curriculum.

So she is happy with:

– many decile 1 & 2 schools getting Year 13 UE pass rates of less than 20% while decile 9 & 10 are almost uniformly above 60%.

– ongoing gaps for Maori and Pasifika compared to the rest of the New Zealand population.   Read more »

PPTA President’s School Highly Funded Compared to Charters

In Saturday’s NZ Herald PPTA President Angela Roberts declared a “broken heart” and “hurt” over a Northland Charter School buying a waka.

This is in keeping with her attempt to protect the PPTA patch against the perceived threat of nine marauding Charter Schools.

She is trying to create the impression that Charter Schools are over-funded. In her PPTA profile Roberts declares herself a teacher of Drama and Economics at Stratford High School.

This school is long established and yet has funding of $8,865.20 per student (over $4.7 million in total – excluding buildings and centralised services).

Four of the nine Charters have got their per student costs below that level already – well within the first two years of their existence. For those schools their annual building costs are included in that figure and well as cashed-up funding for centralised services they don’t receive.   Read more »

What should break the heart of a PPTA President

In Saturday’s NZ Herald PPTA President Angela Roberts announced that a Charter School spending less than her annual salary (and funded from a variety of sources) to buy a Waka for their children to use “breaks my heart” and “hurts”.

What should really break the heart of a PPTA President?

Shouldn’t it be massively funded PPTA staffed schools achieving atrocious results for children that lock them into unemployment and negative social cycles. Shouldn’t it be the huge set of negative differentials in New Zealand for Maori and Pasifika students?

No doubt people are trying hard in these schools but the results should be breaking Roberts’ heart. Here a few examples from State Schools where children need help:

Tamaki College gets $6 million per year (exclusive of buildings and centralised services) but only 44% of their Year 11s get NCEA Level 1 and only 11% of their Year 13s get UE.    Read more »

How Charter Schools do superbly pushing it up hill (with the proverbial rake)

As outlined here Charter Schools have to start on a fraction of a state school funds. They start on approximately $1million set up per 200 students whereas State schools start on up to 5 times that amount per student.

Another huge money State School is making progress towards starting – this time in Hamilton for $40 million dollars.

So…..of the reasons not to start Charter Schools (according to the Left):

– They are expensive. Well clearly they are not.

– The are a failed model overseas. Stanford University says the are fabulous for needy children.   Read more »

PPTA points the finger – 3 pointing back at them

State school costs hit hard at this time of the year. Every kid having a laptop at school is highly debatable in terms of its educational worth but Principals clearly think they need to keep up with the school down the road.

Fairfax and the Herald both carry articles this morning on school costs.

In the Fairfax article Angela Roberts of the PPTA throws the blame on the taxpayer (via the government):

Post Primary Teachers’ Association president Angela Roberts said costs for parents were rising as the Government “abdicated responsibility” for costs of learning essentials.

“There is a mismatch between what New Zealand really wants for their kids and what the Government will fund,” she said.

Charter Schools are a lot cheaper for families – no donations and many costs such as uniform,stationery and IT covered.    Read more »

Rodney Hide on union fear and loathing of charter schools

Rodney Hide writes in the NBR about the fear and loathing of charters schools by doctrinaire unions.

On cue with last week’s column explaining why lefties are a miserable lot, the principal of Bruce McLaren Intermediate, Roy Lilley, hit the papers having a moan.

His gripe? Charter schools. His worry? That they will pinch his pupils with inducements of a free uniform and a policy of no donations. The new charter schools, he says, will have a “huge” and negative impact.

The newspaper reports Mr Lilley’s school having 416 spare places. The 2013 Education Review Office Report confirms the roll at 248. His school’s almost two-thirds empty.

Why isn’t Mr Lilly offering free uniforms? Why isn’t he having a “no donations” policy? Why isn’t he offering what students and parents want, so a charter school is no threat? Why isn’t he offering to rent his spare capacity to the new charter school and achieve synergy?

Why aren’t we laughing at him?

We would if he was the local supermarket whining about a rival opening up down the road. We would be laughing and looking forward to sharper prices, better service and higher quality produce.

Teachers, and their unions aren’t interested in any of that, they are interested in protecting their own hegemony of the system.

But schools are different. Here we have never known choice and competition. Our schools are run like the Soviet economy. The Ministry of Education is our Kremlin.

The Soviets were frightened: who would feed, clothe and house them if not the government? We are the same. We can’t imagine schooling in the absence of government direction and control.

Who would build the schools? Who would feed the teachers? Who would decide what is to be taught? And how?

Read more »

Charter School Opponents will ignore Sweden now

Four points from this research summary 

1. Growth of free schools has led to better high school grades & university participation, even accounting for other factors such as grade inflation.

2. Crucially, state school pupils seem to benefit about as much as independent school ones. When ‘bog standard comprehensive’ face new tougher competition, they shape up. They know they’ll lose pupils if they don’t. As the researchers put it: ‘these positive effects are primarily due to spill-over or competition effects and not that independent-school students gain significantly more than public school students.’

3. Free schools have produced better results on the same budget. Their success cannot be put down to cash. Or, as they say, ‘We are also able to show that a higher share of independent-school students in the municipality has not generated increased school expenditures.’

4. That the ‘free school effect’ is at its clearest now because we now have a decade’s worth of development and expansion.

[Full report ]

Will NZEI and PPTA show the integrity that good teachers expect from students – or will people like NZEI’s Paul Goulter continue to lie to the New Zealand public and try and deny parents the right to choose educational options for their children.

Given that this evidence was available in November of last year. Paul Goulter needs to retract this statement:

“We would go further and say that, based on overseas evidence, there are absolutely no benefits to be gained from charter schools.”

Are teachers really happy with this kind of representation?