Steven Joyce

The delusions of John Minto

The next big thing that Hone Harawira and John Minto has got going is Mana News.

And they are straight into bizarre conspiracy theories…and likely a few defamation suits.

Eleanor Catton has managed to reveal the mechanism of the National party media dictatorship this could be extremely dangerous for the survival of our democracy. According to Sean Plunkett you are not permitted to criticise the National government its unpatriotic and against the people of New Zealand.  Too many reporters within journalism have intimate relationships with the national party that are a conflict of interest designed to mislead the New Zealand public. These reporters are holding back real journalists like Andrea Vance. It is unnatural for the press gallery to be uncritical of a seven year old government. The Prime minister office is pouring to many resources into dirty politics and controling the media and little effort to tackle the housing crisis or poverty reduction.

The conspiracy would be more believable if they could spell Sean Plunket’s name properly. I’m surprised that they haven’t substituted every ‘s’ for a ‘$’.

scheme-560x818 Read more »

Trotter gets a bit wonky with his thinking

Chris Trotter looks at Winston Peters and at John Key.

It’s a good article but gets some things dreadfully wrong.

The successful populist politician’s response will always echo that of Alexandre Ledru-Rollin, one of the leaders of the February Revolution of 1848 in France: “There go the people. I must follow them, for I am their leader.”

To carry off this leading-by-following trick, the populist politician requires both a vigilant eye and an unusually sensitive ear. In present-day New Zealand, for example, only a blind, deaf and extremely dumb populist would assume that to stay behind the rage he has only to hurl abuse at John Key’s government. All he would demonstrate by such tactics is how thoroughly he has missed the fact that John Key is, himself, an extremely accomplished populist leader. What’s more, John Key, unlike Alexandre Ledru-Rollin, has no need to go running after the crowds. Thanks to his pollster, David Farrar, and focus-group supremo, Mark Textor, the Prime Minister knows exactly where the people are going. That’s why he’s so often to be found parked there, waiting for them to arrive.

David Farrar is probably New Zealand’s best pollster…he keeps John Key and Steven Joyce focussed.

Though the article is wrong and shows it clearly in this statement.

Mr Key’s Cabinet’s slavish adherence to neoliberal ideology has meant that economic and social policies that could have really assisted the “average Kiwi” are consistently ruled out of contention

Read more »

Steve Joyce is on a tax payer money giveaway rampage

Far from being a careful steward with our money, Joyce is being exposed as a bit of a spendthrift

Taxpayers will pay $1.9 million to bankroll the next two New Zealand Open golf tournaments despite the predicted economic return falling well short of the requirement for such a large investment of public money.

The Major Events Development Fund investment requires a return of $4.50 for each dollar handed out. The 2012 and 2013 golf tournaments, which received taxpayer contributions totalling $1.15 million, returned $2.55 for each dollar received, documents obtained by the Herald under the Official Information Act show.

The projected returns for the 2015 and 2016 events are in a briefing for Minister of Economic Development Steven Joyce.

But the figures have been blacked out in the version given to the Herald. The report does state that the expected returns “are lower than those that would be expected at the requested level of investment”.

Mr Joyce said the projected return was “just one of the things that is taken into consideration”.

Tax payers shouldn’t be propping up rich people.   What is it with the Government and sports like the America’s Cup and the NZ Golf Open?  Both of these attract extremely wealthy players, syndicates, companies and individuals, yet they think nothing of coming to the tax payer money trough and helping themselves. Read more »

Think of it was a rare event: Everyone except National and Sky City agree – no deal!

Andrew Little has joined the chorus of people telling Stephen Joyce and Sky City to get knotted.

SkyCity must find the cash to meet the shortfall for its international convention centre, Labour leader Andrew Little says.

“A deal is a deal,” he said today. “SkyCity offered to build the convention centre, if they can’t come up with what they now say is a shortfall in costs, that’s their problem.”

Mr Little says there’s no way taxpayers should meet the extra cost.

SkyCity agreed to pay for the $402 million centre in exchange for gambling concessions. The Government kept its part of the deal, and put legislation through parliament.

Now SkyCity is saying construction costs have blown out by between $70m and $130m, and it wants the Government to pay at least part of that.

Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce says that’s the least preferred option. He wants the plans re-examined to see where money can be saved, and he’s suggested Auckland Council might come to the party. Read more »

Sky City turns Steven Joyce into the Labour and Green Parties’ whipping boy

via Newstalk ZB

via Newstalk ZB

Stephen Joyce must be wondering: with friends like Sky, who needs enemies?

Opposition parties are urging the Government not to fund a cost blowout in SkyCity’s proposed new international convention centre in Auckland.

A resource consent application lodged on Friday revealed the centre’s initial $402 million price tag is set to increase by $70m to $130m.

Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce blamed inflation, and said the cost differential will be addressed through savings on the project, including in procurement. Read more »

The great Sky City tax payer robbery, coming to a trough near you

Mr Joyce said he couldn’t rule out the taxpayer helping to meet part of the shortfall.

No.

No no no!

Design improvements, a new five-star hotel and inflation have rocketed up the SkyCity convention centre’s pricetag by as much as $130 million.

And while additional gambling concessions are off the table to meet any shortfall for the building, taxpayer funding is under discussion.

SkyCity yesterday lodged its resource consent application for the centre, which it’s building in return for concessions such as extra gaming machines worth as much as $42 million a year in additional profits.

Announcing the application, SkyCity chief Nigel Morrison revealed the cost of the convention centre had jumped to between $470 million and $530 million.

The casino operator had previously estimated it would cost $402 million, which it agreed to cover in return for extending its Auckland gaming licence until 2048.

SkyCity — which reported a net profit of $123.2 million last year — is now in talks with the Government on how to fund the increased cost.

In August, SkyCity announced it had increased the scope of the project, unveiling plans for a 12-storey five-star hotel.

Private Public Partnerships are agreements where the private partner takes the risk away from the public, not the other way around.   Read more »

Guess who won Massey University’s Quote of the Year competition?

Massey University held its usual Quote of the Year competition recently, and one of my quotes from the election campaign and Dirty Politics was a finalist.

The finalist quotes were:

I’m sorry for being a man. (David Cunliffe’s unusual apology at Labour’s domestic violence policy launch at a Women’s Refuge forum)

We think it’s, um, pretty legal. (Steven Joyce asked by reporters about the use of a song for the National election campaign that sounded very similar to one by Eminen)

You work in news you puffed up little shit!…When will you glove puppets of Cameron Slater just piss off? (Internet Party press secretary Pam Corkery at a campaign event, when the media kept asking for an interview with Kim Dotcom)

It was all steam and no hangi. (Te Tai Tokerau MP Kelvin Davis describing Internet-Mana after it failed to deliver on the hype on election day)

He could probably survive shooting little kittens in his garden with a shotgun. (Kim Dotcom on how little impact Dirty Politics had on Prime Minister John Key’s approval ratings.

I play politics like Fijians play rugby. My role is smashing your face into the ground. (Whale Oil blogger Cameron Slater after Nicky Hager’s book Dirty Politics was released)

I did not have textual relations with that blogger. (Spoof of John Key’s initial denial that he had received texts from Whale Oil blogger Cameron Slater tweeted by Lloyd Burr of RadioLive)

It terrifies me how much of our economy is stuck inside a dairy cow. (Comedian Te Radar talking to farmers at Fieldays)

Get past the breath-taking PR snow job. (Former CERA communications adviser Tina Nixon describing the press conference to announce the resignation of chief executive Roger Sutton after a sexual harassment complaint)

No more beersies for you. (Tagline in this year’s Health Promotion Agency advertising campaign to reduce harmful alcohol consumption.)

Guess which quote has won.   Read more »

Rodney Hide on what would have happened if Winston had been given the hacked information

Rodney Hide uses his column in the NBR to explain what would have happened if Winston Peters had gotten his hands on the documents of the illegal hacker/criminal who attacked me.

Mr Hager took the emails and made quite a story. Post-election, his claims haven’t stood up. But no matter. It was big news ahead of the election. The media loved it. Dirty Politics dominated the election campaign.

Now imagine Mr Peters with the same material. He could weave a far better story. He would make it sound truly shocking, terrible and totally corrupt. With Mr Peters it would sound believable.

By comparison, Mr Hager lacks gravitas. He was good – he convinced people he was an investigative journalist – but he’s nowhere near as good as Mr Peters.

More than that, Mr Peters had the protection and platform of Parliament. He could have said anything.

He would have been the news every night

And he would have sustained the attacks day in, day out. He would have done so for months. With that material, and that story, no matter that it wasn’t true, Mr Peters would have brought the government down. Every page of Dirty Politics would be another day’s shocking news. And when he ran out of pages he would be busy alluding to what was to come.   Read more »

Many thanks to Annette King, Winston Peters and Russel Norman for continued promotion efforts

With all my mentions in parliament, Cam Slater is sure to be number one

With all my mentions in parliament, Cam Slater is sure to be number one

Third day in a row in parliament the opposition has been working hard promoting me and the blog.

Q1: 21 mentions by name from Annette King, Russel Norman, Steven Joyce and Winston Peters.

Q7: 8 mentions by Metiria Turei. She is going to have try quite a bit harder to match the efforts of Labour in this.   Read more »

Tax payer funded welfare for elite sports with intangible returns. What to do next?

It appears the business case for handing our taxes to the likes of two-timer Dalton still doesn’t stack up, but the politicians are still star struck.

Treasury has advised against taxpayer backing for Team New Zealand in the next America’s Cup, labelling it “poor value for money”.

The Government contributed $5 million to Team New Zealand to help retain key staff soon after its 8-9 loss in the 34th Cup in September last year – against Treasury advice – and is considering investing a similar amount to the $36 million contributed last time.

Treasury repeated its opposition in March, documents released to the Herald under the Official Information Act show

It told Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce and Finance Minister Bill English that Team NZ should get private backing and that “the extent of any positive economic impacts from a Government contribution [to the last challenge] have not been established” and could be gained without putting in public money.

“A number of benefits from Government support are often claimed, including increased economic activity, tax revenue, employment and an opportunity to promote New Zealand industry and tourism.

“However it is likely that many of these benefits would be achieved if TNZ were to enter without Government support.”

The whole area of government sponsored sport is rather murky to be honest.  For big events can’t be done without the financial support of the big wallet that has all our money in it.   Read more »