submarines

Aussies looking at nuke subs?

Are the Australians considering the use of nuclear submarines for their Navy? It would seem they are at least exploring the options.

Aside from a pair of research reactors, Australia hasn’t shown much interest in nuclear power. Will that change? It could, at least as far as the Royal Australian Navy is concerned, according to a green paper by University College London (UCL). Published on August 12, the discussion paper argues that it is entirely feasible for Australia to replace its aging fleet of diesel submarines with nuclear-powered craft for about the same cost as the conventional design currently under consideration.

Australia’s current fleet of six Collins-class submarines are at the end of their service life and will need replacement by the late 2020s. A 2013 Australian government white paper by the states that the government is committed to building a replacement for the Collins class in South Australia and that this will be an “evolved” Collins using diesel power rather than a nuclear design.   Read more »

Time to Give Kirchner a Tune Up

The Falklands referendum came out exactly as expected, a Briton shall never be a slave and the argies got a good kick in the cods.

The emphatic Yes-vote is a public relations setback for Cristina Kirchner, president of Argentina, who has reignited the dispute over sovereignty, maintaining that the islanders are an “implanted” population lacking the right to self-determination.  Read more »

Argies seem to have forgotten they lost the war

The Telegraph

The Argies have let the mists of time allow them to forget that they lost a war against the UK in their last outing:

The Argentine foreign ministry on Monday declared “illegal and clandestine” the activities of Desire Petroleum, Falkland Oil and Gas, Rockhopper Exploration, Borders and Southern Petroleum, and Argos Resources on the grounds that they are drilling in Argentine waters.

President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner said the companies were operating “in a sovereign area of the Argentine nation and as such fall within its specified laws and rules”. The companies “are not authorised by the Argentine government under law 17.319 on hydrocarbons”, she added.

According to the Argentine foreign ministry, her declaration opened the way for the “immediate launch” of criminal proceedings.

However, the UK Government said the moves were the “latest attempts to damage the economic livelihoods” of the islands and said it would work with any company potentially affected to help them deal with the practical implications.

Having a Vanguard submarine surface 300m off the beach front at Buenos Aries might remind the Argies, or maybe an Astute Class running some surface exercises with torpedos.