Sue Bradford

Sue Bradford is desperately trying to backpedal on Martyn Bradbury’s civil unrest plans

The left wing are backpedalling on talking up riots. It seems the Media Party weren’t picking up what they were laying down.

So now they are trying to talk all the rowdies into a peaceful protest.

But the stroppy talk is still there

Veteran protester Sue Bradford hopes tomorrow’s anti-TPP protests will be staunch, but won’t become violent.

Some opponents of the controversial trade deal are planning a blockade around Sky City where the agreement will be signed tomorrow morning.

Other opponents are planning a separate march at Aotea Square and along Queen Street from midday.

Sue Bradford said she doesn’t want to see anybody harmed or any property damaged during the protests.

“The intention is to create as staunch a protest as possible, that’s certainly what I aim to be part of to make our point heard as strongly as possible, but in a non violent way.”

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Farrar wrong on Franks

In a superb post explaining why Sue Bradford is not in the running for Children’s Commissioner, Arts, Travel & Lifestyle blogger David Farrar says the following:

Stuff reports:

Poverty activist and former Green Party MP is in the running to become our next Children’s Commissioner.

No she isn’t. Applying for a job doesn’t mean you are in the running. If I applied to be UN Secretary-General, that doesn’t mean I’m in the running. To be in the running you need a non-zero chance of getting the job.

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1) We don’t need a Children’s Commissioner, 2) We don’t need Sue Bradford

Sue Bradford has organised to have her name put forward by the Green Party to be the next Children’s Commissioner.

Poverty activist and former Green Party MP Sue Bradford is in the running to become our next Children’s Commissioner.

The Green Party has put Bradford forward as one of its nominees to fill the role when current commissioner Russell Wills’ five-year term ends in June this year.

Many of Bradford’s most significant political accomplishments during her decade in Parliament were in the area of children’s rights.

She won law changes to lift the youth minimum wage to adult rates, and to extend the time mothers in prison could keep their babies with them.

Bradford’s most polarising victory was the repeal of section 59 of the Crimes Act – the “anti-smacking law” – which removed the defence of “reasonable force” for adults who smacked their children, leading to protests and death threats against her.

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How can 20 people get so much media coverage?

Twenty losers, dropkicks and rowdies go and try to disrupt a Christmas party and all the news networks cover it like the whole of Auckland turned out to protest the National Party.

3News:

Auckland Action Against Poverty set its sights on National’s Christmas party today, taking aim at the Government’s management of the country’s poor.

Protestors tried to storm the venue in west Auckland, determined to put a stop to holiday celebrations.

It looked as though the National Party’s Christmas bash was over before it even began. It wasn’t Christmas carollers on National’s doorstep today, but protestors with a clear message, singing: “party’s over, time for change”.

The protesters came in force – a large group of them turned up in vans before trying to storm the venue, with a number of them then chaining themselves to the front gate.

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Face of the day

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Veteran protester Sue Bradford

Today’s face of the day is a party pooper. She and her foul mouthed band of Grinchs tried to ruin Christmas for the National Party.

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Dodgy Union brings violence and bullying to picket lines at Bunnings stores

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Bill Bradford stopping shoppers from entering Bunnings

I covered First Union in Dodgy Unions, and now they are running amok against Bunnings bringing violence and bullying to the picket line as they trespass inside stores.

Little wonder that it is Sue Bradford and her ratbag husband Bill Bradford in the forefront of it all.

Scuffles have broken out and police have stepped in as more than 50 people protest in Auckland against Bunnings roster changes.

The Bunnings New Lynn, Botany, Mt Wellington and Manukau staff, who say they received great public support, began striking at 10am on Saturday.

First Union retail and finance secretary Myxine Gay said after the strike finished at 11am, staff stayed in position, chained to the entrance.

Police, who were already at the strike “keeping an eye” on the event, stepped in to move the protest on but protesters refused to move.    Read more »

Paul Henry likely to testify against Sue Bradford rent-a-mobster

Good.

Broadcaster Paul Henry is likely to be called to give evidence in the trial of a man charged with assaulting him.

Diego Leonardo Chavez, 35, appeared in Auckland District Court today to face two charges of assault.

Assisted by a Spanish interpreter he entered not guilty pleas and a judge-alone trial was scheduled for October.

The allegations relate to a protest outside Prime Minister John Key’s post-Budget speech at Auckland’s SkyCity events centre on May 22.

It was reported at the time that protesters led by veteran activist Sue Bradford charged at the entrances but were pushed back by police. Read more »

Trotter is onto it with the loss of Russel Norman

Chris Trotter thinks the bloodless coup within the Greens is a move to push the Green party towards the right.

I think he is right…and as usual wrong at the same time.

RUSSEL NORMAN’S DECISION to step down as the Greens co-leader reflects the party’s longstanding determination to reposition itself rightward. For eight years Norman’s personal energy and political discipline succeeded in turning aside the pleas of a clear majority of the Greens’ membership to break the party out of its left-wing ghetto. Only by exploiting to the full his party’s consensus-based decision-making processes was Norman able to keep the Greens anchored firmly on the left of New Zealand politics.

For eight years Norman strove to fashion a Green Party manifesto that was not only compatible with the Labour Party’s policy platform but would, to a remarkable degree, serve as its inspiration. His astonishing and largely successful mission to master the challenges of contemporary economics; an effort which allowed him to participate in policy debates with an authority sadly lacking in his predecessors, and to drag Labour along in his wake, is probably the most impressive achievement of his leadership.

It was this ability to render the Greens’ left-wing policies economically intelligible that allowed Norman to spike the guns of the Greens’ very sizeable “moderate” (for want of a better description) faction. The latter had demonstrated its power by installing Metiria Turei as co-leader – rather than the overtly left-wing Sue Bradford – following Jeanette Fitzsimons’ retirement in 2008. Had the rules made it possible, this same faction would have radically repositioned the Greens as an ideologically agnostic environmentalist party of the political centre; one capable of forming a coalition with either of the main political parties.

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Garner’s winners and losers

Duncan Garner has published his list of winners and losers for 2014.

I will be talking with Garner at 1545  about this on Radio Live.

My political winners and losers of the year.

WINNERS

1. JOHN KEY

For all the obvious reasons. He is still the PM and he is still widely popular according to the polls. He had the kitchen sink thrown at him and he almost won the election outright. He’ll have to watch it doesn’t go to his head.

2. ANDREW LITTLE

Couldn’t win a fight in a kindergarten but ends the year on top. His caucus didn’t want him, his party didn’t want him, his electorate didn’t want him. Yet he ends the year looking strong and competent as Labour’s new leader.

3. KELVIN DAVIS

He beat Hone Harawira and therefore beat Kim Dotcom – do I have to say anymore?

4. SUE BRADFORD

She knew Dotcom and Harawira were in an unholy alliance and she put her principles before it all. She called it right – she has values and principles that are beyond reproach whether you agree with her politics or not.

5. CAM SLATER – WHALEOIL.

Yes he’s a dirt-bag, muck-raking, scum-bag attack blogger, but he likes it that way. He doesn’t play by any rule book yet he’s been judged a journalist by the courts. Despite having his dirty laundry aired for the world to see he remains talked about, his blog gets more hits than ever, he breaks stories and the PM returns his texts. Oh and he wins mainstream media awards.

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Why is it Kiwiblog has the best posts when Farrar is away?

Lifestyle, arts and travel blogger David Farrar is away again.

Kiwiblog has again reverted to a blog of David’s mid-life crisis and travels.

Not content with his own travel blogging, he also now has guest travel blog posts.

However he does have a guest post from Kiwi in America that is very good. Why is it Kiwiblog’s best posts are while he is away?

Regular readers of Kiwiblog will recall my lengthy essay posted on Easter Friday about the recent history of Labour; some of it based on my time as an activist there until the mid 90’s attempting to explain Labour’s present day conundrum.

In a nutshell it said that an attempt by the left of the party to seize permanent control of Labour after the massive post Rogernomics ructions under the leadership of Helen Clark, led to a gradual purging of activists from the centrist and right wings of the party. Clark, and her followers in the Head Office and regional hierarchies, ensured the selection of candidates in winnable electorate seats (and after the introduction of MMP, also the party list) that not only ensured she could topple then leader Mike Moore after the 1993 election but also cemented her power base inside Labour guaranteeing her an unchallenged 15 year reign as Labour’s leader. This handed power in the party to an increasingly narrow base of sector and interest groups such as academics, trade unions, progressive feminists and the rainbow coalition gradually driving out activists who were more likely to be white, male, socially conservative, small business owners and church going people of faith. After Labour’s 2008 election defeat, former members of the harder left New Labour Party, homeless after the dissolution of the Alliance, the demise of Anderton’s Progressives and the rise of the Greens, began to come back to Labour assisting in the movement of the party more to the left.

This trend culminated in the amendment to Labour’s Constitution at its 2012 Annual Conference giving 40% of the vote for Party Leader to the party membership and 20% to the affiliated unions leaving only 40% in the hands of the Parliamentary caucus. This new formula enabled David Cunliffe to win the first full leadership primary in 2013 despite having only minority support in caucus – the first time this had ever happened in Labour’s history. The result of his elevation to the leadership was Labour’s third successive and even more disastrous defeat.

When you drive out of the party its more centrist activists, you leave a vacuum that has been filled by harder left activists. When these same activists, alongside the more traditionally left wing trade union leadership, have control of the party’s candidate selections, its policy formation and now the election of its leader, over time you end up with a party, candidates and policies that no longer appeal to middle NZ and a party that is no longer the broad church it used to be. The party may be truer to its left wing principles but it now produces candidates, policies and campaigning rhetoric out of step with the aspirations of floating middle NZ voters that decide elections. National’s moderate centrist direction under John Key has become the natural repository for various key demographic groups that once used to strongly vote Labour and accordingly, Labour has ended up falling further behind National in each subsequent election post its 2008 defeat culminating in its second lowest vote this election since its formation in 1916!

Labour is now undertaking yet another review of why it was defeated and another likely more bruising leadership primary.

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