Sue Bradford

Garner’s winners and losers

Duncan Garner has published his list of winners and losers for 2014.

I will be talking with Garner at 1545  about this on Radio Live.

My political winners and losers of the year.

WINNERS

1. JOHN KEY

For all the obvious reasons. He is still the PM and he is still widely popular according to the polls. He had the kitchen sink thrown at him and he almost won the election outright. He’ll have to watch it doesn’t go to his head.

2. ANDREW LITTLE

Couldn’t win a fight in a kindergarten but ends the year on top. His caucus didn’t want him, his party didn’t want him, his electorate didn’t want him. Yet he ends the year looking strong and competent as Labour’s new leader.

3. KELVIN DAVIS

He beat Hone Harawira and therefore beat Kim Dotcom – do I have to say anymore?

4. SUE BRADFORD

She knew Dotcom and Harawira were in an unholy alliance and she put her principles before it all. She called it right – she has values and principles that are beyond reproach whether you agree with her politics or not.

5. CAM SLATER – WHALEOIL.

Yes he’s a dirt-bag, muck-raking, scum-bag attack blogger, but he likes it that way. He doesn’t play by any rule book yet he’s been judged a journalist by the courts. Despite having his dirty laundry aired for the world to see he remains talked about, his blog gets more hits than ever, he breaks stories and the PM returns his texts. Oh and he wins mainstream media awards.

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Why is it Kiwiblog has the best posts when Farrar is away?

Lifestyle, arts and travel blogger David Farrar is away again.

Kiwiblog has again reverted to a blog of David’s mid-life crisis and travels.

Not content with his own travel blogging, he also now has guest travel blog posts.

However he does have a guest post from Kiwi in America that is very good. Why is it Kiwiblog’s best posts are while he is away?

Regular readers of Kiwiblog will recall my lengthy essay posted on Easter Friday about the recent history of Labour; some of it based on my time as an activist there until the mid 90’s attempting to explain Labour’s present day conundrum.

In a nutshell it said that an attempt by the left of the party to seize permanent control of Labour after the massive post Rogernomics ructions under the leadership of Helen Clark, led to a gradual purging of activists from the centrist and right wings of the party. Clark, and her followers in the Head Office and regional hierarchies, ensured the selection of candidates in winnable electorate seats (and after the introduction of MMP, also the party list) that not only ensured she could topple then leader Mike Moore after the 1993 election but also cemented her power base inside Labour guaranteeing her an unchallenged 15 year reign as Labour’s leader. This handed power in the party to an increasingly narrow base of sector and interest groups such as academics, trade unions, progressive feminists and the rainbow coalition gradually driving out activists who were more likely to be white, male, socially conservative, small business owners and church going people of faith. After Labour’s 2008 election defeat, former members of the harder left New Labour Party, homeless after the dissolution of the Alliance, the demise of Anderton’s Progressives and the rise of the Greens, began to come back to Labour assisting in the movement of the party more to the left.

This trend culminated in the amendment to Labour’s Constitution at its 2012 Annual Conference giving 40% of the vote for Party Leader to the party membership and 20% to the affiliated unions leaving only 40% in the hands of the Parliamentary caucus. This new formula enabled David Cunliffe to win the first full leadership primary in 2013 despite having only minority support in caucus – the first time this had ever happened in Labour’s history. The result of his elevation to the leadership was Labour’s third successive and even more disastrous defeat.

When you drive out of the party its more centrist activists, you leave a vacuum that has been filled by harder left activists. When these same activists, alongside the more traditionally left wing trade union leadership, have control of the party’s candidate selections, its policy formation and now the election of its leader, over time you end up with a party, candidates and policies that no longer appeal to middle NZ and a party that is no longer the broad church it used to be. The party may be truer to its left wing principles but it now produces candidates, policies and campaigning rhetoric out of step with the aspirations of floating middle NZ voters that decide elections. National’s moderate centrist direction under John Key has become the natural repository for various key demographic groups that once used to strongly vote Labour and accordingly, Labour has ended up falling further behind National in each subsequent election post its 2008 defeat culminating in its second lowest vote this election since its formation in 1916!

Labour is now undertaking yet another review of why it was defeated and another likely more bruising leadership primary.

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Martin Martyn is eating humble pie.

Eating humble pie with a little help from his  ' friends'

Eating humble pie with a little help from his
‘ friends’

Martin Martyn has been eating humble pie on his Union funded blog.

Like the men in the above photo I would like to assist him with his meal so will share some of the highlights of his snack with you all.

I was wrong, horribly, horribly, horribly wrong.

[…]

Sue Bradford was right, Josie Pagani was right, and god damn it- the mainstream media were right.

[…]

Cameron Slater manages to come out as a winner in all this.

[…]

I will step back from blogging for a couple of weeks to reflect on things.

 

Couldn’t she wait until the bodies were cold?

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Siobhan Downes reports

Bradford told Fairfax Media when she sent the tweet she was not aware anyone had been killed.

“It is a total tragedy, and [I have] every sympathy to those affected. It’s just terrible.”

But she stood by her comment. “The Work and Income office is the front line of the Government’s welfare policies. People are very, very badly affected by what happens there everyday.

“This is in no way excusing what’s happened. But I think it’s unfortunate that governments sometimes don’t understand or accept the risks that they put their staff under in implementing their policies.”

Not backing down.  In spite of this:

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Do the Greens now support trucking?

The Greens have released billboards depicting workers cleaning up after the Rena grounding in 2011.

PastedGraphic-2

Back in 2007 the Greens were strongly supporting coastal shipping as an alternative to trucks:

“Coastal shipping is a key part of the alternatives-to-roads strategy. The more freight we can get on to ships the better.”

That was when Sue Bradford was still a Green MP.  Read more »

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Chris Trotter is either on the payroll or simply lost the plot completely

internut-party

Chris Trotter, it appears, has also sold out his principles. He has seriously unhinged over the past few days writing post after post after post variously screaming at Labour MPs to
STFU” and calling them stupid.

Now he is out-right shilling on behalf of the Internet Mana Party, it seems he too ahs sucuumbed tot he magic millions from the Crook of Coatesville.

BRACE YOURSELVES, COMRADES, for some horrendous poll results. The next round of surveys from Colmar Brunton, Reid Research, DigiPoll, Ipsos and Roy Morgan will almost certainly register a major slump in the Centre Left’s support and a concomitant rise in National’s numbers – quite possibly to 55 percent-plus. Labour and the Greens will both take nasty hits and the Internet-Mana Party (IMP) will be very lucky to make it above 1 percent. Apart from John Key, the only other person likely to be smiling is Winston Peters.

The polls will be bad because the framing of Kim Dotcom’s latest intervention in New Zealand politics has been so near-universally and overwhelmingly negative. From the Right (and Sue Bradford) has come the steady drumbeat that Hone Harawira and the Mana Party have done a “dirty deal” with Kim Dotcom and, in the process, “sold out their principles” for cash.

Amplifying this message, TV3’s political editor, Patrick Gower, has characterised the IMP strategy as “a rort” (a term which normally denotes morally questionable if not downright illegal manipulation) even though what the Mana and Internet parties are proposing is well within the rules of MMP and has been a feature of every election campaign since the latter came in force in 1996. Gower’s destructive message has, however, been repeated, ad nauseum, by an endless succession of editorial writers, talkback hosts, columnists and bloggers.

What Chris Trotter forgets is that those editorial writers, talkback hosts, columnists and bloggers are merely repeating the same attack lines that people like Trotter himself, and Martyn Bradbury and all the other sellouts have used against National and Act over Epsom and against Peter Dunne in Ohariu.  Read more »

Colin Espiner on Kim Dotcom and his marriage of convenience

Colin Espiner is snarky in his article…very snarky indeed.

Say what you like about the sacrifice of conscience for cash – a great big German spanner has just been flung into the machinery of this year’s election campaign.

I wasn’t going to write about Kim Dotcom’s vanity party again this week. It has had far more publicity in its short life than it deserves.

Plus, it seems that everywhere you look Dotcom is there. Giving evidence in the John Banks trial. Breaking up with his wife, Mona (on Twitter, of course). Fighting Hollywood over access to his millions. Calling on Prime Minister John Key to resign (again).

Shortly, it will be Dotcom in the dock as he fights extradition to the United States on fraud and racketeering charges. Forget Banks and buckets of mud – that hearing is going to be the trial of the year. So a bit of Dot-gone seemed like no bad thing.

And then suddenly, there he was in a civil union with the beneficent ghost from socialist Christmases past: Laila Harre.

And Colin Espiner thinks Laila Harre is the bee’s knees…or does he?

The media was expecting Dotcom’s Internet Party would announce a flake as its new leader. Or a complete moron. Either would have done just fine. We could have ridiculed them, and moved on to more important matters.

But Harre isn’t a flake. And she’s certainly no moron. She’s one of the most driven, persuasive and intelligent politicians I’ve met. I don’t know how Dotcom managed to put a ring on the darling of the Left but on the face of it, it’s a major coup.

The question, though, is for who?     Read more »

John Armstrong on Internet Mana, cash in politics and where it all leads

John Armstrong starts off by highlighting the prostitution of the left wing to the personal interests of a rich german crook, except for the integrity shown by Sue Bradford:

Sue Bradford may not be everyone’s cup of tea. But the veteran activist and former Green MP deserves credit for her point-blank refusal to be enticed into joining those entranced by the cult of personality otherwise known as Kim Dotcom.

As someone who has spent her adult life going into battle for the poor and the powerless, Bradford is the last person who would doff their cloth cap at someone whom she dubs as a “neo-liberal capitalist millionaire”. She does not mean that as an insult. She sees it simply a statement of fact.

Working in league with Dotcom would be pure anathema for her because he is someone totally incompatible with the ethos which drives the Mana movement.

For Hone Harawira, Mana’s leader, Dotcom is a welcome means to an end, however; namely an electoral pact with Dotcom’s Internet Party..

So Bradford has walked from Mana despite being a founding member of the three-year-old political movement.

Those that remained barely seemed to notice. Their eyes were filled with dollar signs instead.

One familiar face was soon replaced by another. Slipping with ease into her new role as the leader of the fledgling Internet Party, Laila Harre greeted Dotcom’s announcement that he was bank-rolling his political vehicle with a further $3 million as welcome change. For once, a really big cheque was being written for a party on the left, not the right.

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The Press editorial on the Mana/Internet rort – Politics deserves better than this

The Press editorial is refreshingly robust this morning.

There can have been fewer link-ups in New Zealand politics more cynical and crassly opportunistic than the one just formed between Hone Harawira’s Mana Party and the Internet Party, masterminded and financed by the internet developer Kim Dotcom. There is not the shadow of any principle involved in it.

Before he arrived in New Zealand, Kim Dotcom’s public image was of a high-living, luxury-loving party animal. For all his technical skills, there is not the slightest evidence that either now or in the past he has had a serious political thought in his head.

It is almost certain his only contact with the poor and dispossessed whose interests Harawira purports to represent would have been as employees. Indeed he may be a little startled to find that he is financing the far-left Laila Harre, the newly announced leader of the Internet Party.

As for the internet issues the Internet Party is supposedly concerned about, if Harawira and Mana had any particular interest in them before Kim Dotcom and his money came on the scene they kept very quiet about them.

It is, in other words, a marriage of convenience. It gives Harawira and Mana access to a pile of cash that will enable him to fossick for the party vote outside its own Far North bailiwick. That pile of cash may also help him achieve his aim of getting rid of the present National-led Government.

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Breaking: Sue Bradford quits Mana

Good on her.  Someone has principles and isn’t for sale.

UPDATE:

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