surveillance

Face of the day

Introducing the Minister in charge of PM surveillance

His royal Greenness, Russel ‘ How many times did you call Whaleoil ? ‘ Norman.

Russel Norman

Russel Norman

 

Dr RUSSEL NORMAN (Co-Leader – Green) to the Prime Minister: How many times since November 2008 has he spoken with blogger Cameron Slater on the phone and how many times, if any, has he texted him?

-nzdoctor.co.nz

David Cunliffe – “New Zealanders should be entitled to a right of privacy”…except Cameron Slater

Has David Cunliffe realised the irony of him exclaiming that New Zealanders “should be entitled to a right of privacy”?

Everyone except me and the people I communicate with…all on the whim of a criminal hacker.

The media and the opposition parties gleefully climbed into it…and now the sanctimonious hypocrites are all crying about spying and privacy.

Well they are part of the problem and certainly not part of the solution.

Labour leader David Cunliffe said the Prime Minister may not be fit for office if he has misled New Zealanders about the extent of mass surveillance they had been subjected to from its spying agencies.

This morning in Mangere, Mr Cunliffe told reporters that if evidence emerged that Mr Key had mislead the public, it was “extremely serious”.

“I would be extremely upset if the pledges that have been made to New Zealand around our freedom from mass surveillance prove to be false. ¬† Read more »

Face of the day

Glenn Greenwald

Glenn Greenwald

Henchmen

Henchmen

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All the tinfoil hat wearers are coming out of the woodwork over the CCTV plans for Auckland

I’ve been listening to NewstalkZB this morning and all the tinfoil hat wearers are calling in about the CCTV plan for Auckland.

One nutter even rang in talking about how smart meters for electricity are emitting radiation and frying our brains, along with them being part of a government plot to raise power charges…no doubt she has wrapped her meter box in tinfoil.

Another guy called about how he no longer uses cellphones because they poll cel tower emitting radiation, even in his tinfoil lined room, which just bounce the radiation from his phone around and around.

Auckland Council is being asked to explain its plans to build a city-wide surveillance network which could have facial recognition technology, The New Zealand Herald reports.

The network of CCTV cameras would be available to police so the could monitor crime, traffic, emergencies, and public safety issues.

But Batch Hales from the Council for Civil Liberties says it’s unclear why the city would need it. ¬†¬† Read more »

Bed bad!

Tagged:

More Cunliffe bullsh*t

Did anyone hear David Cunliffe being interviewed by NewstalkZB’s Rachel Smalley this morning at¬†5:12am?

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Bet Len does this next

Len Brown is intent on charging us for rubbish collections we already pay for in our rates and is spending like a drunken sailor on his pet projects.

He is going to need more revenue off of ratepayers, what’s the bet he is looking at solutions like this:

Councils that use spy cameras to enforce parking rules are making nearly nine times more in motorists’ fines than authorities which do not use them.

Official figures show that councils which are using CCTV to enforce parking rules made £49.35 per household last year.

This compares to just £5.69 per household in councils which do not have them. The figures come ahead of a consultation on a ban to stop councils using cameras to snap people parking illegally, which closes next week.

Government figures show a quarter of councils in England ‚Äď 70 out of 288 ‚Äď currently use CCTV cameras to enforce parking rules.

This often means that drivers who unwittingly park in a loading bay can receive a fine through the post weeks later. ¬†¬† Read more »

Who was made to remove their head gear?

Here is a little quiz for you.

At the ANZ on Lincoln Road in Henderson this morning a security guard outside stopped a customer and made them remove their head gear…

hatorburqa

Who had to remove their head gear?

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Full story after the break. Vote before reading on.

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Wonder if they bothered with JK’s

Seems world leaders have had their phones monitored by US spies.

I wonder if they bothered with John Key’s? Or maybe he wasn’t important enough.

They probably monitored McCully’s and Groser’s when they want to listen into phone sex¬†or Gerry’s if they wanted to know how a huge fat bloke can get women to remove their underwear.

Hours after Angela Merkel confronted President Barack Obama over allegations that her personal mobile had been tapped, new documents showed that US surveillance extended to dozens of other heads of government.

The National Security Agency (NSA) encouraged other US government departments to share their “rolodexes” of foreign contacts which were then targeted. ¬† Read more »

Why most don’t care about GCSB

Foreign Policy has a very good article about the fuss over “spying” and why most people simply don’t care.

For most people, privacy, too, has become the “shining artifact of the past” that Leonard Cohen once¬†sang¬†about. Indeed, anyone with a mobile phone understands that everything from their bank records to the products they buy online to the telephone numbers they dial and the addresses to which they send emails are recorded somewhere — whether by a private business, their own employers, or, of course, the government.

We are being spied on all the time, and usually by private enterprise…and the media.

Viewed from this perspective, is it the general public’s comparative lack of indignation over the NSA surveillance scandal that is surprising, or is the real shocker that journalists, activists, and politicians feel so outraged? Yes, the U.S. government is indeed the Biggest Brother of them all, but most people go about their daily business being spied on and having their data mined by any number of small- and medium-sized brothers. Of course, someone who is outraged by the attempts to jail the leakers and prosecute and intimidate their journalist and activist colleagues would insist, and rightly so, that these sorts of things should not be permitted in a democracy. But the gap between the outrage of the chattering classes and the public’s apathy — or, more likely, resignation — illuminates the essential difference between the elite’s understanding of the world and everyone else’s. To put it starkly, members of an elite tend to believe they can change things; most everyone else knows that, except in a few rare instances, they cannot. In an essential sense, the real question for members of the elite is not, why isn’t the public outraged, but why are we?¬† Read more »