tax

Labour’s hypocrisy in going after tax dodgers

As we blogged earlier the Labour party is mounting a campaign to go after tax dodgers.

Instead of shrugging, John Key should immediately be doing three things:

  • Stop New Zealand being used as a tax haven;
  • Stop multinationals dodging the tax they owe here;
  • Urgently launch a full Parliamentary inquiry into tax dodging in New Zealand.

John Key’s doing his best to protect the mega-rich.
But we can force him to take action.

CLICK HERE TO FORCE ACTION ON TAX DODGING NOW

Together, let’s make John Key do more than shrug,

Labour Campaigns Team

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Oh dear, how sad, academic troughers get it wrong…again

sugartax

Looks like arts, travel & lifestyle blogger, David Farrar, has scored a direct hit against the troughers banging on about a sugar tax.

He’s calling out the sugar petition that’s being organised by well-known anti- sugar troughers as misleading. And he’s right.

A sugar tax petition states:

            New Zealand has a problem. We are the third fattest nation in the world.

This is not true.

The WHO database for Obesity is here.

We are 29th, not 3rd.

Outrageous that a petition has such a misleading “fact”.

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The thin end of the Internet GST wedge has arrived

I’m not sure how Todd McClay thinks that breaking John Key’s ‘no new taxes’ pledge is going to help National but he has decided to bring in a tax on internet purchases anyway.

The Government is moving to slap the goods and service tax on online service purchases, which will mean a price rise for the likes of subscriptions to Netflix and Apple services.

It is proposing a law change which will require the overseas retailers to be GST-registered and for them to return the tax to the Government – which says it is now missing out on around $40 million a year and growing.

Currently if you buy anything worth less than $400 from overseas you don’t have to pay the 15 percent GST.

“It is about creating a level playing field for collecting GST and putting New Zealand businesses and jobs ahead of the interests of overseas suppliers,” Revenue Minister Todd McClay said.

The Bill was introduced to Parliament today and the Government hopes the law will be in place in October next year.    Read more »

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Labour’s ‘new’ company tax policy is the same as what is allowed already

Company tax? Wouldn't know, never run a company

Company tax? Wouldn’t know, never run a company…next question

Good grief, after signalling a ‘new’ company tax policy focussed on making life easier for small business we find out that Andrew Little and the Labour party know three fifths of five eights of stuff all about existing systems and tax arrangements.

He launched a discussion document on the policy at a speech to the Hutt Valley Chamber of Commerce this morning.

“This proposal gives business owners the option to pay up to 100 per cent of their tax through regular withholding payments, at the rate they set themselves,” Mr Little said.

“Alongside this, I’m also announcing that we would be scrapping late penalties for provisional tax and increasing the threshold for when provisional tax applies, from $2500 to $5000.”

At present, provisional tax rules require a business to estimate, in advance, its taxable profits for the year and pay tax in three large instalments over the year.

“If they guess wrong, they can be faced with a big bill at the end of the year which can push a small business to the wall,” Mr Little said.

“Under Labour’s proposal, businesses will have the option of choosing to pay their tax through regular instalments at a rate they can adjust. This means businesses can align their payments to suit their circumstances.    Read more »

And another Farrar kicking for Robbo

Our Pinko arts, travel and fitness blogger mate continues to point out what everybody knew, Grant Robertson is not a finance minister’s arsehole.

Grant Robertson has exclaimed:

The National Government has big questions to answer about how a provider of services to thousands of vulnerable New Zealanders is set to fold, ’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson says.

Relationships Aotearoa which provides support and counselling to families, individuals and survivors of domestic violence is set to shut its doors, minus any last minute intervention.

“There are thousands of vulnerable people and families who rely on Relationships Aotearoa for critical services. The government cannot leave them in the lurch.

“Like other non-governmental organisations, Relationships Aotearoa has been seriously underfunded in recent years. It has been asked to do more with less and the strain has clearly started to tell.

This is typical Labour. If an NGO has financial issues, then the answer is the taxpayer must throw more money at them. In the same breath they expect us to believe they would ever have lowered the deficit.     Read more »

Otago Uni’s Department of Arse Clowns

Arse Clowns

The other day academics troughers from the University of Otago’s Department of Public Health Troughers pimped out a claim that a salt tax could reap in $450 million.

The Taxpayers thought the claim was a pile of goat poo and looked into this wild claim.

As a result of their investigations they’re now calling out Otago University to pull in their researchers.

Research by the Taxpayers’ Union indicates that the $450 million tax revenue suggested by Otago University Associate Professor Nick Wilson from a salt tax would result in a 2,500% increase in the price of salt for Kiwi consumers.

Taxpayers’ Union Executive Director, Jordan Williams, says:

“The vast majority of the salt manufactured in New Zealand is used for pharmaceutical and agricultural purposes, with only around 30,000 tonnes being used for food products.Professor Wilson’s $450 million over 30,000 tonnes is $15,000 in tax per tonne. A tonne of food grade salt is currently worth around $600 in the wholesale market.”

“Unless Professor Wilson is wanting to tax the salt consumed by cows and the saline solution used by hospitals, his numbers mean consumers will be paying 25 times the current price for salt.”*   Read more »

Maori proposing “indigenous tax” on foreign visitors

The University of Auckland Business School is hosting a seminar where:

Our aim is to share a very simple model to improve equality of opportunity for all people in Aotearoa where the indigenous tax™ will be used to invest in people’s economic wealth and social well being.” Anita Stowers and Maki Maihi-Taniora

The purpose of the meeting/seminar is to bring together interested persons to listen and discuss the indigenous taxation concept and to see whether university academics are interested in exploring the concept as part of wider research into its viability economically, politically and culturally.

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Swiss voters reject carbon tax by overwhelming 92%

It seems the Swiss are perhaps the most sensible people in Europe.

They certainly don’t appear to be infected with the cult of gaia, after overwhelmingly rejecting a carbon tax with 92% of the vote.

Swiss voters Sunday overwhelmingly rejected an initiative that would have scrapped the Alpine country’s value-added-tax system and replaced it with a carbon tax, a move that would have made gasoline, heating oil and other forms of power more expensive for consumers.

Roughly 92% of voters opposed the initiative, known as “Energy Rather than VAT,” while 8% supported the measure, according to preliminary results from 13 of the country’s 26 cantons.   Read more »

Will Labour run on a Financial Transaction Tax?

Labour have a finance spokesman who has never worked in the real world, and basically has very little idea about finance.

It wouldn’t be surprising if he did what the Democrats are doing now they are in opposition, and promote a Financial Transaction Tax.

To pay for the plan, the U.S. would impose what Van Hollen called a tiny fee on market transactions, of 0.1%. A Democratic aide said the fee would apply to any buy or sell transactions, and include stocks, bonds and derivatives. The plan would also limit tax deductions on CEO pay above $1 million.

So far this type of tax has only been promoted by the looney left, in the form of the Alliance and Jim Anderton, Mana, and the Greens.

5. Financial Transaction Tax

The Green Party will:

  1. Involve New Zealand with the group of countries working to agree on a tax on international currency movements, to set up a fund to provide capital for poor countries to improve their social and environmental wellbeing. This would discourage currency speculation without being high enough to impede genuine trade.

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Cheese eating surrender monkeys give up on massive taxing of the rich

Stupid Cheese Eating Surrender Monkeys they even surrendered on taxing the rich massively hard.

Of course they had to surrender on the socialist utopia of taking the rich because simply put massive taxes on the rich simply don’t work.

François Hollande’s unpopular tax changes that imposed a 75% rate on earnings above €1m (£780,000) will quietly disappear into the history books from Thursday.

The French socialist president announced plans for the controversial measure during his 2012 election campaign as a means of forcing the wealthiest to help dig the country out of economic crisis.

Although supported by the left, the reform sparked accusations of an anti-business agenda. After the “supertax” was announced in September 2012 the government was accused of shooting itself in the foot by risking an exodus of high-profile personalities. Business leaders expressed fears that investors would pull out of France.

France’s richest man, Bernard Arnault, the chief executive of luxury group LVMH, took out Belgian nationality, and the actor Gérard Depardieu also moved across the border to Belgium before obtaining Russian citizenship.   Read more »