Teachers

Oh dear Lord, when will this end?

Sex pest Damian Christopher Gillard. Photo / Greg Bowker

Sex pest Damian Christopher Gillard. Photo / Greg Bowker

Hardly a week goes by without some news about a teacher having trouble with sexual boundaries when it comes to students.  Jared Savage reports

An Auckland school failed to act on concerns raised by two teenage students who felt unsafe around their teacher – six years before he was arrested for sexually grooming one of them and other underage girls.

The lack of records on the employment file of Damian Christopher Gillard at Papatoetoe High School also meant the 2006 complaints were missed by a 2009 police inquiry over similar allegations of which he was later acquitted.

Gillard, the head of the languages department, was eventually convicted of making sexual advances to one of the pupils who complained – and six other young girls – after a second police investigation in 2012.

He was sentenced in May to 9 years in prison for a raft of sexual crimes, dating back to 1994 when he was a teacher at Greenmeadows Intermediate in Manurewa.

He was found guilty of indecent acts against seven students, all younger than 16, such as kissing or touching their legs and breasts under the pretext of searching them for cigarettes.

The offending escalated to sex with a 14-year-old girl.

So that’s one thing.  The other problem is that when these concerns are raised, “the system” becomes a huge obstacle.  Granted, we don’t want to get the torches and pitch forks out straight away, but there is enough evidence now that concerns about teachers aren’t progressed through the system in a way that responsibly protects existing and future victims.   Read more »

Parents not the Village Idiots Labour/Unions think they are

Labour and the teacher unions spend their whole time treating the parents of school age children like they have IQs lower than a jam sandwich.

Examples are ignoring the benefits of National Standards (they are going to ban them of course), telling families in challenges areas that they don’t want Charter Schools (they are going to ban them of course), telling parents they will save $100 on donations – while charging them $3.50 a week for a “device”, etc.

Parents have clearly also seen through the – slap a few more teachers in the classroom (wherever they come from) and she’ll be right approach too.

New Zealanders would rather money was spent on improving teaching standards than on reducing class sizes, a Herald-DigiPoll survey reveals.

Education has become a political battleground before September’s election, with both major parties promising to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on it.

Asked about their priorities, more than 60 per cent of those polled said they would spend money on trying to improve teaching standards rather than cutting class sizes.  Read more »

He was registered when he pestered girls with lewd texts

The Labour party opposes charter schools on the basis that not all teachers are required to be registered. They says that registration is designed to protect the kids.

Yet almost every day there is a registered teacher before the courts for despicable behaviour towards children.

The teaching profession is becoming worse than the catholic church for harbouring pedophiles.

Former teacher Bart de Jong, who sent a series of texts to a 10-year-old girl pupil, some calling her “hottie”, “cutie” and “girlfriend”, has had his registration cancelled for serious misconduct.

Police had charged him with sexual grooming. He was found not guilty when he appeared in the Whakatane District Court in September 2012.

In the sentencing notes, Judge Louis Bidois said that was “not because you have proved your innocence, but because the legislation was not well drafted”.

A Teachers Disciplinary Tribunal decision published today said de Jong had maintained “from the beginning” his actions were wrong.

“I have taken responsibility for my actions and have paid a hard price for what I did,” he said.

He did not intend to teach again, volunteered to give up his teaching registration, had moved to Tauranga and was working in a different industry.   Read more »

Budget over, cue the whingers, here come the teacher unions

What is it with teacher unions and people involved in education?

They constantly have their hands out and when more money, in this case $857 million extra, is spent in their area of the economy they are whining like unpaid hookers that it wasn’t enough.

Early Childhood Council chief executive Peter Reynolds attacked the subsidy increases as a deliberate deception that will push-up charges for parents and reduce quality.

Salaries were a big cost to centres, and the subsidy related to that had increased by less than 1 per cent, Mr Reynolds said, which was below inflation and “another funding cut in drag”.

Ms Parata rejected that, and said ECE care was 33 per cent more affordable as a proportion of household income than 2007. Government spending on the sector had almost doubled since 2007/08.

“Parents can see from the Budget that the Government has allocated over $155 million [extra ECE funding]. That is a significant chunk of change over the next four years.”  Read more »

Bet he was registered too

The Teachers Council has been so effective in protecting our children from these filthy predators

A teacher at an Auckland school is before the court accused of committing “indecent acts” in his classroom.

The 54-year-old man was granted interim name suppression during his appearance at Auckland District Court this morning and a ruling was also made to keep the name of the school secret.

It is alleged that in June last year, the man wilfully committed two indecent acts.

One of the charges lists the road the school is on as the location of the offence, while the other one specifies “in a classroom”.

A spokesman for the New Zealand Teachers’ Council said they were “well aware” of the situation and a full investigation into the man’s actions would take place at the conclusion of the criminal proceedings.

The school at which the defendant worked suspended him shortly after the alleged incidents took place, and he resigned a month later when the teachers’ council got involved.

Sickens me to think these animals manage to get past all the checks and balances.   Are there any?   Read more »

The PPTA doesn’t care about kids

PPTA-boss-nasty

The PPTa demonstrates why they should be deregistered as a union.

They don’t care about education or kids, they are hell bent on politicking and are so focused on revenge against charter schools they have implemented a boycott of them.

Like their preferred political party they are resorting to the nasty.

If you had one word to describe the feeling in the room at Mangere’s Rise Up school it would be hope.

The beginning of the new school year meant opening day for a new school in a struggling south Auckland community and parents and teachers are desperate for success. But even as it opens, the teachers’ union wants the charter school and others like it to fail, so much so they are banning their members from having anything to do with them.  Read more »

PPTA opposes courses because kids might get a job out of them

You really have to wonder about the state of mind of teachers who oppose literally everything in education, including the possibility of students getting jobs.

Russell Blackstock reports:

It is 7.40 on a humid Auckland morning and a dedicated group of wannabe IT experts is already lining up outside a classroom at Avondale College in the west of the city.

While waiting for their teacher to arrive, the students are busily updating their social media pages and browsing news sites on smartphones and hand-held tablets.

Most of their school friends are barely out of bed, still at home wolfing down breakfast.

The youngsters — aged 13 to 17 — are enrolled in the school’s new Innovation Programme, a partnership with United States giant Microsoft. The kids are hoping for a headstart into computer industry roles such as software and game designers, solution architects and project managers.

Bill and Melinda Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs — the computer whizzes of the past taught themselves to code at home in their bedrooms, but the geeks of the future will learn in the classroom.

The classes run from 8am every weekday before the regular school day starts.

The students also attend for three hours most Saturday mornings and even during the holidays.

So they even volunteer to attend classes outside of normal school hours…perish the thought that they might just be enjoying the courses.

David Officer is just 13 but is already devising a programme to help teachers mark students’ work.

Madeleine Day, 16, is developing a mobile asset-management system that she hopes will help the fuel industry make complex calculations about weights and measures.

“The course is fantastic and is geared towards preparing you for a job or further education,” Day says.

“I would like to become a software engineer or work in the gaming industry, ideally for the likes of Microsoft or Google.”

Sounds promising…but wait here come the whingers.

Not everyone agrees that public-private partnerships are a good thing. The Post Primary Teachers’ Association has expressed concerns at such ventures.

John Guthrie, senior lecturer at the University of Otago’s Business School, warns that large corporations like Microsoft can simply use such courses to capture future customers and headhunt employees.

“It is not unlike a bank targeting youngsters and encouraging them to save with them,” he says.

“The hope is that if they get them early enough, the kids will become customers for life. It makes good business sense.

So the kids might end up with a job at the end of school?  Yes, I can see why some would view that as be a disaster. The teacher unions wouldn’t want kids to succeed now would they?

 

Source/ NZ Herald

Thursday nightCap

Te Ururoa Flavell calls out the teacher unions

Te Ururoa Flavell has called out the teacher unions who are boycotting a charter school in Whangarei.

Te Ururoa Flavell, Maori Party Co-Leader, has expressed disappointment at the influence of PPTA in advising Whangarei Boys High teachers to not teach students who attend Te Kura Hourua Te Kapeha Whetu.

“As I understand it the Board of Trustees at Whangarei Boys High was happy to support Kura Hourua students in specific areas such as the visual arts. That type of cooperation has been modelled in the relationships that many other kura establish with general schools, wananga, polytechnics and other education providers across New Zealand. It represents a dynamic relationship that we should surely be fostering in our communities – that the education and learning of our students impacts on us all,” says Te Ururoa Flavell, Maori Party Co-Leader.

“I recognise that Partnership Schools is a major political issue and teachers have a right to their views on educational policy, but what about the kids? Surely we should be putting the best interests of our young people ahead of our politics.”

“I was a teacher for many years and I know that the profession prides itself on putting the interests of our children first, but this flies in the face of those values. I would have thought as teachers, that what matters is that every student experiences success. That’s what Te Kapeha Whetu want. That’s what the Maori Party wants. Come on PPTA – surely there are other ways of making political statements that do not impact so immediately on our kids.”  Read more »

Teachers now bullying NZPF for expressing support of government policy

A few weeks ago we had the Investing in Educational Success announcement by the PM.

Phil Harding (NZPF president) came out strongly in favour of them.  He is now facing an almighty backlash.  He is being bullied to reverse his position publicly.

On Monday a survey will go out to principals – it will be slanted – most positive principals will ignore it because they are too busy getting on with the business.  Harding will be under immense pressure to cave.

Phil Harding has already conveyed his support for the proposals, and tried to influence the vote.

He makes a few points of concerns he has heard about the proposals then dismisses them as being narrow in perspective, which they are. He doesn’t go anywhere near the substantive arguments.

He says: ‘Maybe what is needed is a wider vision, such as a national school of leadership. Imagine a leadership focused college which offered professional development support for experienced principals, first time principals, aspiring principals, and middle leaders, in a “best evidence” informed and structured way. Such a school could build coherence and provide networking of best practice which could be embraced by all leaders, whilst inter-school collaboration is handled collegially and professionally and locally.’

How would that ‘best evidence’ practice, Phil, be different from the managerialist toxic stuff being handed down by STA providers.

‘Best evidence’ is a term much bandied about mainly to ill-effect.    Read more »

Tagged: