Teaching

Another registered teacher in trouble

Labour and the teacher unions oppose charter schools because they say the lack of a requirement for teachers to be registered puts kids at risk.

Today yet another teacher is under investigation for untoward behaviour with students.

A female physical education teacher at an Auckland high school is on sick leave after she was accused of favouritism towards at least one teenage boy.

As a result of the allegations, the high school is remarking a year of internal NCEA grades for the teacher’s Year 13 class, prompting concern among parents and students some grades will go down.

The teacher, who the Herald has chosen not to name, has been on extended sick leave since the allegations surfaced last month. ¬† ¬† Read more »

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I think Tom Parsons should resign, he’s done

It isn’t often I call for someone to resign, but today I have to.

Check out the attitude of Tom Parsons, the¬†president of the Secondary Principals’ Association, has to say.

A leading educator has launched a stinging attack on the increasing diagnosis of learning difficulties, saying it is causing too much work for schools – and doing students more harm than good.

“We’ve gone overboard with diagnosing what used to be called quirky, what used to be called a nerd. Now he’s got ADHD, gonorrhoea, piles and acne,” Secondary Principals’ Association president Tom Parsons said.

School workloads were increasing as teachers and principals were forced to accommodate “badly behaved” and “traditionally quirky” students under special assessment conditions (Sac). The New Zealand Qualifications Authority said 5771 students had been approved for Sacs this year for external or internal assessment – a big rise from 3696 last year.

Parsons said the stigmatisation of “otherwise healthy students” was doing more harm than good and narrowed their horizons.

“Today, I am part of a system that encourages, indeed demands, accountability for those differences. When I went to school, students who were different were often known as quirky. They were unlikely to change and went about their business as best they could, with a fair chance of success, and often with a great deal more resilience than the rest of us, to assist them in the big wide world.” The incidence of dyslexia, dyspraxia and attention deficit disorder was rising in secondary schools, and causing a “logistical nightmare” for schools trying to resource their needs.

Read more »

Yep, these ones were registered too

The Labour party and the teacher unions all oppose charter schools because not every teacher has to be registered.

Apparently teacher registration is there to protect the children…from registered teachers like this?

Two Auckland teachers have been struck off after Disciplinary Tribunal hearings.

One, a primary school relief teacher, sent photos of children to a man with whom he was in a close personal relationship.

He knew that man was sexually attracted to young children and was undergoing medical treatment to address the condition. ¬†¬† Read more »

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Parents not the Village Idiots Labour/Unions think they are

Labour and the teacher unions spend their whole time treating the parents of school age children like they have IQs lower than a jam sandwich.

Examples are ignoring the benefits of National Standards (they are going to ban them of course), telling families in challenges areas that they don’t want Charter Schools (they are going to ban them of course), telling parents they will save $100 on donations – while charging them $3.50 a week for a “device”, etc.

Parents have clearly also seen through the – slap a few more teachers in the classroom (wherever they come from) and she’ll be right approach too.

New Zealanders would rather money was spent on improving teaching standards than on reducing class sizes, a Herald-DigiPoll survey reveals.

Education has become a political battleground before September’s election, with both major parties promising to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on it.

Asked about their priorities, more than 60 per cent of those polled said they would spend money on trying to improve teaching standards rather than cutting class sizes.¬† Read more »

An email from a Kiwi teacher living offshore

David Cunliffe wants immigrants and former Kiwi teachers to fill the gaps his 2000 new teachers policy has created.

One such teacher emails:

Morning Cam,

Over the weekend I‚Äôve unwittingly become one of the teachers Labour desperately needs to make up the 2000 extra they’ve promised.

I work in Brunei, make decent coin, can save, and can travel cheaply.¬† I’ve got 15 years experience, post-grad quals, and have worked in a range of unique schools from Kuwait to Laos to Kazakhstan as well as many years in NZ.

Frankly, there’s not a snowballs chance in hell I’d ever return to full time teaching in NZ.¬† Schools have become an unwilling conduit for solving all of society‚Äôs ills.¬† Teachers are expected to be social workers, counsellors, and doctors on a daily, week in week out basis with zero respite for staff simply wanting to plan, teach, assess, evaluate, plan…

I left NZ disillusioned with the profession as it stood.¬† The bulk of my time was taken up with behaviour management.¬† All the professional development I undertook (usually at my expense) was rendered useless by the sheer volume of time taken up having to manage the behaviour of wayward kids. ¬† Read more »

Random Impertinent Questions

So parents are too hopeless to pay $2 a week for $100 in school fees Labour is giving schools BUT the same parents have $3.50 a child a week for a laptop?

David Cunliffe says that immigrants and retired teachers will fill the requirement for 2000 new teachers…those immigrants¬†won’t drive up house prices will they?

How many retired teachers will re-up and has Labour even asked them if they want to do this?

Wasn’t Labour going to crack down on immigrants and now their education policy relies on immigrants?

How are Labour going to integrate this with the immigration policy ?

How many schools have a spare classroom to house these new teachers? ¬† Read more »

Adding less than one teacher per school will not reduce class sizes

Labour has said they are going to reduce class sizes by adding 2000 new teachers to the pool.

Today, I am proud to announce that Labour will reduce class sizes by employing 2,000 more teachers. This will help all our kids get a world-class education.

This policy will reduce secondary school class sizes from 26 students or more per class to just 23. Year 4-8 classes will shrink from 29 students down to 26.

Unfortunately his maths doesn’t work.

There are currently 2539 schools in New Zealand.¬† Read more »

There are probably more teachers behind bars now than Catholic priests…

Laura Walters manages to type while holding her nose:

Damien Christopher Gillard, 43, was sentenced on charges of sexual grooming, unlawful sexual connection with girls under 16 and offering to supply methamphetamine. The offending took place between 1994 and 2012.

Last year, Gillard tried to make a fake passport in an attempt to flee the country to avoid trial.

Gillard was a Papatoetoe High School teacher before being suspended in 2012 after the offending.

When he was arrested in July, Papatoetoe High principal Peter Gall wrote to parents whose children had potentially been affected to tell them Gillard had been suspended.

There were seven victims who were either current or past pupils of Gillard at Greenmeadows Intermediate School or Papatoetoe High.

In the Manukau District Court today, Judge Charles Blackie said Gillard had abused the trust pupils, parents and the community put in teachers.

“A high level is expected of schoolteachers in dealing with students,” he said.

Thanks judge. ¬†I agree. ¬† ¬†The problem remains that we have too many sexual predators that aren’t stopped quickly enough.

How many are teaching now?

Read more »

Bottom up rebellion

Marlborough Express on the Teachers Council

The Marlborough Express editorial about the woeful inadequacy of the former Teachers Council is particularly relevant, especially the bit about carping teacher unions.

Little wonder teachers are protective of the Teachers Council. It’s probably only polite since it has been so very protective of them.

Unhappily, this has been at the expense of accountability to parents and the public.

The new body is going to have strengthened abilities to exert disciplinary process on errant teachers; and it will have a much more independent look to it rather than the status quo of teachers sitting in judgment on themselves – which they’ve been doing in exquisite privacy.

Education Minister Hekia Parata says new legislation improves teacher registration, enhances reporting requirements and provides a greater range of options when dealing with disciplinary matters. That last bit is particularly important.

The PPTA believes the new body has too much policing power, such as naming teachers facing disciplinary inquiries, which raises the protest that it could jeopardise “natural justice”.

Let’s remind ourselves how well natural justice has been getting along under the Teachers Council.¬† Read more »