Television New Zealand

Comment of the Day

There is a lot of fuss about the demise of Campbell Live, mostly from the wailing left wing.

They claim that it is the death of current affairs.

Unfortunately they are wrong, there are plenty more current affairs shows as one commenter, GregM, this morning pointed out.

Yep says it all. The other thing that cracks me up is the lefty whingers going on that this is the end of current affairs programs on free to air TV. Hardly. We still have:
Q+A
The Nation
Native Affairs
Sunday
360
3rd Degree (changed name to 3D)
60 Minutes
20/20
Attitude   Read more »

State funding of news?

The Labour party, unsurprisingly, has come out and said there should be state funding of news.

Labour wants taxpayers to fund news and current affairs programming to prevent it disappearing from our screens.

It comes after MediaWorks’ decision to review its 7pm show Campbell Live.

Leader Andrew Little says Labour’s considering a policy which would see the Government fund daily current affairs.

“We’re going to have to find a solution to that, and New Zealand on Air is one potential solution – to use its funding to ensure that sort of programming is available, whether it’s on private channels or publicly-owned channels.”

Mr Little says current affairs programmes are essential for a good, strong, accountable economy.

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Consumer NZ slams action on global mode

Consumer NZ has come out against the cartel of media companies trying to shut down global mode provided by some ISPs.

They stop short of calling them mafia-like but they do call them out for their blatant protectionism.

NetGuide reports:

Consumer New Zealand has joined the growing number slamming the proposed legal action by Sky, Lightbox, TVNZ and Mediaworks to stop global mode, saying the proposed action is ‘a huge blow to consumers’.

Sue Chetwin today slammed the move as ‘simply protectionism of old content distribution models’.

A number of New Zealand ISPs received a legal letter from Buddle Findlay, representatives of Sky, TVNZ, Lightbox and Mediaworks last week, ordering them to stop providing access to services such as Global Mode which provide access to international geo-blocked TV and movie services.

“While they may argue that this is not about taking action against consumers, it’s exactly consumers who will end up paying more because of this,” Chetwin says.    Read more »

TVNZ intent on pimping the dead

What one earth is TVNZ thinking in pursuing the release of photographs of the last moments of those killed in the tragic balloon crash in Carterton.

This is nothing more than attempting to profit from the unfortunate demise of some blameless victims.

Photos showing the final moments of the fatal Carterton balloon crash should be released to the media in the interests of public education and safety, lawyers for TVNZ have argued.

Wairarapa photographer Geoff Walker took photos of the balloon as it crashed killing pilot Lance Hopping and all 10 passengers on January 7, 2012.

During an inquest in July, coroner Peter Ryan ordered the release of four photos to the media, but Walker refused to release them, saying publication breached his copyright.

He then asked for a judicial review, which went ahead today at the High Court in Wellington.  Read more »

Cowardly Cunliffe backs down over boycott

Cowardly Cunliffe has decided that discretion is the better part of valour and climbed down from his high horse called Sanctimony and will now debate John Key after “assurances” from TVNZ that the debate will be “fair”.

After declaring that he would debate John key “anywhere, anytime, even on Mike Hosking’s show” back in April he then went weak kneed and packed a sad only a kid in the sandpit could emulate…and then flip flopped on that.

What is this, kindy?

Labour Party leader David Cunliffe says Television New Zealand has given its assurance that its political debate will be conducted with absolute political neutrality.

Mr Cunliffe is due to go head to head with Prime Minister John Key in a pre-election debate chaired by broadcaster and TVNZ presenter Mike Hosking.

Labour has been worried about Mr Hosking’s political neutrality after he urged a business meeting last year to vote National.

Mr Cunliffe said on Friday that he is prepared to continue with the debate, but TVNZ has not outlined how it will guarantee the debate is neutral.

He said that would be up for further discussion and that Labour and the public will hold TVNZ to it, because he said it’s clear that Mr Hosking does have well-recorded political views.

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Face of the day

One of these things is not like the other

One of these things is kinda the same

– Sesame Street

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Waving the White Flag

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David Cunliffe and Martyn Bradbury are running scared. Read more »

When will TV3 make changes, something has to give

TVNZ

TVNZ

Mark Jennings should have a look at his ratings for the late news which rates pretty well considering Mediaworks put absolutely NO money or resources into it at all.

Jennings seriously needs to answer to shareholders why he thinks a Greenie who lives in Grey Lynn who uses prime time to push an agenda that excites his dinner party guests is the right formula.

Maybe it’s Jennings that needs to go and take a fresh look taken at the leftie agenda that comes out of 3news that condemns it too crap ratings.

Paul Henry is on the payroll who better reflects the public in general and would be good for a ratings jump at 7pm?

Meanwhile Seven Sharp continues to slam them in the ratings.  Read more »

Trotter endorses journalists declarations of political interests

Chris Trotter is a man from the left that I admire.

I enjoy our chats from time to time and he is a good bellwether for what is happening on the left of NZ politics.

He comments on journalistic ethics and undeclared inherent political bias.

IF YOU’RE READING this column you know already that it’s coming to you “From the Left”. You are, therefore, free to absorb its contents with a rare foreknowledge of its author’s ideological predispositions.

But how often can you say as much? How many of the stories, columns and feature articles published every day carry such a useful consumer warning? And how easy is it, Dear Reader, in the absence of such a warning, to discern how those stories, columns and feature articles have been put together and why?

Because, make no mistake, everything you read, watch and listen to, every newspaper article, television programme and radio broadcast, has been carefully constructed by an individual, or individuals, working consciously, or unconsciously, from well-established ideological predispositions.

The information a journalist decides to include in a story is very often less important than the information he or she decides to leave out. Indeed, this is almost always the case. Because in any “newsworthy” event there will always be many more details and contributory causes than a journalist’s employers could ever possess either the time or the space to relate.

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Brian Edwards on Shane Taurima, Linda Clark and Conflicts of Interest

My good friend Brian Edwards has this to say about Shane Taurima and his actual conflict of interest:

There was nothing terribly complex about Shane Taurima’s situation with regard to his job as Head of TVNZ’s  Maori and Pacifica Department once he had, albeit unsuccessfully,  sought the Labour Party nomination for the Rawhiti Ikaroa seat following the death of Parekura Horomia. Taurima had very publicly nailed his political colours to the mast. In doing so he had effectively disbarred himself from any further involvement in News or Current Affairs broadcasting with the state broadcaster. The potential conflict of interest could not have been more clear.

Television New Zealand apparently did not see it that way. Perhaps they thought that Taurima’s failure to actually win the nomination made all the difference. He had been a would-be Labour candidate, not an actual Labour candidate.  (And, as it turned out, would be again.) That rationalisation is so facile as to be laughable. Taurima was politically tainted. He should not have been re-employed in his previous role. But he was.

When he took things even further and  turned his TVNZ office into a Maori/Pacifica Labour Party branch, Taurima did his employer a favour.  Without actually hanging portraits of Savage, Fraser and Kirk on the walls, the conflict of interest in which he and others in his department now found themselves could not have been more patent. To his credit, Taurima had the grace and good sense to resign.

He resigned because the case was so clear cut there was no other option. Unfortunately for Shane Taurima he thought Labour would stand by their electorate chair, instead they have given him the cold-face and turned their back.

There is actually nothing new about all of this. The list of television and radio  broadcasters working in news and current affairs who are or have been simultaneously engaged in activities which conflict with their obligation to be and be seen to be utterly impartial in all matters relating to their jobs, is extremely long. They may well be in the majority. Conflicts of interest among such practitioners abound.

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