The Standard

The left are either quitting, running away or being told to stop

Dimpost’s Danyl seems to be the latest one that’s down in the dumps

I’m not saying I’m taking a break from blogging, exactly, because every time I do that something really interesting happens that I want to blog about and I look like a doofus. But I’m taking a break from blogging unless something interesting happens.

Partly because this is because I’m busy with other stuff. But I’m also feeling despondent about left-wing politics: Labour is a horrible mess and looks to remain one, and the Greens couldn’t capitalise on Labour’s failure and grow their vote. It’s depressing.

This might sound solipsistic but I feel like some of the left’s problems stem from over-engagement with social-media. If you’re listening to and engaging with a cacophony of voices online it’s easy to lose touch with the silent but demographically much, much larger section of the population that aren’t commenting via blogs or twitter etc, and have very different priorities and concerns. So I’m part of the problem!

Ok, so you learned that the Internet isn’t the same as the real world.  That’s a lesson learned.  But you don’t give up.  Yes, I know, you’re not giving up per se, but you’ve lost the energy.

I’ll tell you this much, I couldn’t lose this election.  Either I got the government I wanted, or I got the government I wanted to blog about.   Chin up – there’s work to be done!   Read more »

Clayton knows what’s coming…

Independent MP Clayton Cosgrove knows that the Dirty Politics story is far from over.  He’s trying to cauterise some wounds…

dsad

qqqw

Clayton, I think the left blogs are to do whatever they like.  They are the left’s best advertisement for everything that puts people off about left politics.  Leave them be.  Also:  what’s with Labour trying to shut people up?  Stop it already.

I realise there is some bad news heading Labour’s way, and it is better if there is no backsplatter from the the blogs.  I understand that.  But it isn’t solved by trying to make them shut down.

Read more »

OK, you’ve had your fun. What about law, enforcement, and common sense?

Dirty politics exists.  On all sides.  Instead of everyone being “shocked” and nauseated enough to need a barf bag, everyone should have just gone “yeah?  so what?”.  Surely there is no revelation that political parties have ways to communicate information about themselves and others that aren’t at the level of a formal press release?

Every journalist worth their meager salary will have contacts throughout society that will do anything from whisper little bits of information to receive heavy dossiers or digital storage with information on it.

But things are different when that information has been obtained through burglary and breaking computer security through deliberately trying to find a way in (hacking).

The first is a sleazy way for information to be passed around.   The second, is illegal.   Why is nobody interested in the difference?

I have watched with interest the furore and posturing arising from the Dirty Politics book.

It sickens me to see lots of politicians jumping on the band wagon and ignoring the rule of law. All parties seem to take it as read that it is OK to publish what is essentially personal and private information.

It is not public domain data.

Nobody seems to be addressing the issue of the legality of the stealing and the use of that data. Why does every commentator seem to think these actions are OK, or at least somehow not illegal?

I have just returned from the UK where journalists and others have recently been jailed for hacking the private phones of celebrities and other VIPs. One person was even low enough to hack the phone of a child who had been abducted and murdered. Read more »

Are the Greens and The Standard involved in the most cynical political hit ever?

This, from “Karol” a long-time The Standard regular with deep links into the Green Party

dsfsf

Yesterday I said that the Green Party’s fingerprints were all over this sorry mess beyond Jan Logie.

Today, further proof that this is the Green Party using a young woman to score political points.

And we, I and you, are being told we’re the ones making things up here.

All that I’m trying to do here is hold up this end of the argument, which includes the fact that this is all arse backwards.  We’re having an inquiry into a matter where the alleged criminal hasn’t even been charged, the public is being told via compliant media stooges that it’s all over bar the blame laying (on all men!), and to even dare question the veracity of what’s going on here is getting me labelled as uncaring and  (no surprise) part of “the problem”.

When the left want you  to STOP TALKING, when they want to take your most basic rights away – free speech, presumption of innocence – and then they tell you that you are the most despicable kind of person they can imagine, you know things are going wrong.

Here’s a typical email

Message: Your chastising of Tania Billingsley is revolting. It is very
clear that you do not have even a superficial understanding of
rape-culture. I really think you should refrain from offering any
opinion about this issue. Your facile and juvenile comments reflect a
DEEP lack of education.

When I spoke out about people being ferals, they ganged up and threatened to gang rape my daughter, and you think I lack education?  Or I lack a sense of how wrong rape is?   Read more »

A whole new scoop on Scoop, and it’s all bad

When you become “a person of interest” to the Whaleoil team, we crawl up your business with a fine tooth comb.  Ok, that’s awful, but you know what I’m getting at.

It was as part of looking into the Internet Party and Alastair Thompson that we’ve noticed something odd about Scoop Media’s web site: scoop.co.nz.

But before I jump ahead of myself, let’s have a look at some hard data using Alexa as an independent source.  Neither Scoop Media nor I have the ability to influence what this service captures about our web sites.

First, this is what Alexa has to say about Whaleoil

11

That’s about right.

You can see the Len Brown spike, and the subsequent residual audience we have retained from it.  And you can see the dips around Christmas and New Year.

And, when competing against the likes of TradeMe, Google and Facebook, we still come in at 54th most visited site in New Zealand.

Notice our world-wide rank has improved nearly 3000 spots to 43,000-ish.  43,000th most popular site in the world.  Pretty irrelevant to us, but keep that number in mind.

Next, we look at scoop.co.nz   Read more »

Random Impertinent Question

Q:  Coincidence?

Possible Internet Party Logo evolution?

Possible Internet Party Logo evolution?

Disgraced Alastair Thompson and the Scoop Media Cartel

smc

I don’t know about you, but for me, the world “Cartel” has negative connotations.  The other word most associated with it seems to be “Drug”.

This is a definition of what a Cartel is

A cartel is a formal (explicit) “agreement” among competing firms. It is a formal organization of producers and manufacturers that agree to fix prices, marketing, and production. Cartels usually occur in an oligopolistic industry, where the number of sellers is small (usually because barriers to entry, most notably startup costs, are high) and the products being traded are usually commodities. Cartel members may agree on such matters as price fixing, total industry output, market shares, allocation of customers, allocation of territories, bid rigging, establishment of common sales agencies, and the division of profits or combination of these. The aim of such collusion (also called the cartel agreement) is to increase individual members’ profits by reducing competition.

One can distinguish private cartels from public cartels. In the public cartel a government is involved to enforce the cartel agreement, and the government’s sovereignty shields such cartels from legal actions. Inversely, private cartels are subject to legal liability under the antitrust laws now found in nearly every nation of the world. Furthermore, the purpose of private cartels is to benefit only those individuals who constitute it, public cartels, in theory, work to pass on benefits to the populace as a whole.   Read more »

So who are the notorious bloggers then?

A mate is at Starship at the moment with his boy. He was checking some blogs but ran into some bother with the free wi-fi…seems they are blocking some of the worst sites in the country.

photo 1-1 Read more »

Tagged:

Hooton on Captain Mumblef**k

Matthew Hooton writes at NBR about the continued civil war within Labour’s activist base.

For some time, blogs have ceased to merely report grass-roots political activity: they are now where much grass-roots political activity actually occurs, with hundreds of different perspectives being put forward on various topics.

A generation ago, political reporters hung around dire regional conferences to get a sense of what the grassroots were feeling.

With little happening at today’s stage-managed conferences, it makes sense that they now observe the postings and comments on blogs such as Whaleoil, Kiwiblog and The Standard to get a sense of grass-roots opinion (noting, as always, that conference delegates and blog writers tend to be further to the extremes of the parties to which they purport allegiance).

Even with that proviso, the extreme language at The Standard about Mr Shearer is unprecedented, and it is again being ramped up.

A nickname for Mr Shearer has emerged: Captain Mumblefuck. His intelligence and admittedly poor diction are derided.  Read more »

Shearer too afraid to put leadership to the members

Eddie’s kite flying at The Standard appears to have failed. Eddie wrote that the whispers were that David Shearer was going to put his leadership to the membership regardless of caucus.

Vernon Small however has scotched that pipe dream with his tweet this morning:

Shearer was never going to fall for the kite flying of the disaffected, and his advisors…to a man are all Robertson loyalists and that certainly wouldn’t have helped their cause.  Read more »