Tim Groser

The left wing isn’t happy about Helen Clark becoming a ‘turncoat’

Chris Trotter has a bad case of the conniptions and has lashed out at Helen Clark for her stance over the TPPA:

THE MOMENT THE WORDS were out of her mouth the political wreckage began to pile up. On Radio Live, Sean Plunket positively whooped with delight. It took only a nanosecond for the right-wing shock-jock to register the implications of Helen Clark’s public endorsement of John Key’s position on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Now that the “Darling of the Left” had come out in its favour, Plunket reassured his talk-back audience, the TPP Debate is surely over. Someone, he said, should tell the “tin-foil hat wearers”.

Those who cherish Clark’s memory as Labour’s most successful leader since Peter Fraser, have offered numerous excuses for her actions. She was misquoted, they insist. She didn’t understand how her words would be distorted, others say. Living in New York, she must have been unaware of the way the TPP debate had evolved in New Zealand. Helen Clark would never have knowingly delivered such a brutal blow to her own party.


Seven years after her defeat by John Key’s National Party, Clark’s interest in Labour remains undiminished. Kept informed of its every move by a coterie of loyal supporters, she cannot credibly claim to have been ignorant of the impact her little encomium on the importance of international trade would have.

“What always haunts a Prime Minister”, said Clark, “is: ‘Will there be a series of trade blocs develop that you are not part of?’ Because that is unthinkable for New Zealand as an export-oriented, small trading nation. So of course New Zealand has to be in on the action with the TPP and go for the very best deal it can as the agreement expands beyond the original four economies to a wider regional agreement.”

John Key and his Trade Minister, Tim Groser, have yet to set out the argument for signing the TPP as succinctly as Clark did in New York – or with more force. There is absolutely no way that such a well-considered statement could’ve just slipped out – by mistake.

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I can’t wait for the TPP agreement to be signed

But mostly because I’m sick of it dominating the headlines and it doesn’t actually get anyone anywhere.

Talks by trade ministers involved in the Trans Pacific Partnership have been pushed out by a further day – a sign the agreement is on the verge of a breakthrough.
Prime Minister John Key leaves New York today while Trade Minister Tim Groser remains in Atlanta at the trade talks. Mr Key said those were due to end early this morning but had been pushed out to Saturday (Sunday NZT).

Mr Key said the deal would be worth it, but has recently been talking up the benefits of it non-dairy sectors and warning that it was not as favourable for dairy as other sectors.

“We model the tariff reductions, the change in quota access and all of the other ancillary benefits of free trade agreements. And we know in the case of China, the reduction in tariffs over a period of time were a bit over $100 million. And the other benefits were valued at over $1 billion. TPP is larger than that, even with the current dairy deal.” Read more »


Dirty Media – a nice bit of confusion over names, and just who or what is NZ Inc?

Two out of Two New Zealand Prime Ministers agree: TPPA is good for you

via 3 News

via 3 News

Former Prime Minister and current UN Development Programme head Ms Clark says the TPPA is an important balancing act for the Government. Read more »

Idiot Tim Groser says he is in a “war” over the TPPA

Now, I’m not a diplomat, but even I know that trade negotiations shouldn’t be talked about in public as acrimonious.

That will do absolutely no good.

Trade Minister Tim Groser insists the government will win the political “war” on the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal once the facts and figures can be laid out on the table.

Talks in Hawaii have ended without a finalised agreement, and Mr Groser said the nations involved were down to three final issues, and will meet again soon to iron those out.

Mr Groser said he believed reasonable people were being “whipped up into a frenzy” over issues like pharmaceutical costs and investor-state dispute settlement, by people who oppose the deal for ideological reasons

“Look, this did not reach an agreement for other reasons,” he said of the lack of a deal after the latest talks.

He said the impasse was down to automotives, intellectual property and dairy.

The Minister said the government was fighting TPPA opponents with one hand tied behind its back, as it simply could not provide the real facts and figures while the discussions were still happening.

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Just when you didn’t think a newspaper could stoop any lower… [UPDATED]

Not content with dumbing down the main news section, a newspaper has brought in a gossip column for its business pages…and Holly Ryan the  Retail, Innovation and Manufacturing reporter is running the tawdry little gossip column.

No I’m not kidding.

Let us know … 

This is not a gossip column but….

The new weekly Page2 is a chance to share stories and pictures about business personalities and events so please drop us a line at [email protected] We promise to be nice.”

Perhaps Holly need some tipoffs on NZME unhappiness…   Read more »

Vance kicks a speculator, boots it dead on the full

Andrea Vance likes to think she is a player in the press gallery…the mover and shaker with her finger on the pulse.

Today in the DomPost she writes what could best described as a speculator article based on every bit of rumour and gossip floating around Wellington, not much of which is true.

According to a story doing the rounds, National pollster and blogger David Farrar was recently invited to spend some time with Murray McCully.

Widely expected to step down by the end of this term, the foreign minister mischievously let slip he had no intention of retiring from politics – just to see how long the news took to reach his senior colleagues.

Farrar insists the rumour is not true. But it gives a few clues as to what is occupying the minds of National MPs.

One of the parties says it is b.s. but hey let’s run the speculator anyway. That story is old by the way and was running before Christmas.

McCully is not the most imminent departure from party ranks. Wellington’s worst-kept secret is that Trade Minister Tim Groser is shortly off to relieve Mike Moore as New Zealand’s ambassador in Washington.

Also likely to be waving goodbye to Parliament in 2017 is Assistant Speaker Lindsay Tisch, whether he likes it or not. No-one would be surprised to see Finance Minister Bill English take his leave, once he has delivered the long-promised surplus.

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Desperate National keep doing dumb stuff

National are desperate in Northland and just keep on doing dumb stuff.

The latest cock-up is to suggest that Winston Peters doesn’t care about Northland because he opposes a Free Trade Agreement with Korea.

National is running hard today with the message that Winston Peters does not have Northland’s interests at heart because he is opposed to the free trade agreement with Korea that would demonstrably help avocado and kiwifruit growers and farmers in Northland.

Acting Prime Minister Bill English also suggested that a bill sponsored by a New Zealand First MP could block the legislation associated with the free trade agreement going through.

National candidate Mark Osborne mocked Mr Peters’ promises made yesterday while campaigning for Saturday’s byelection on the streets of Kaitaia that he would back a referendum on cannabis, a pledge he withdrew an hour later.

And ministers at Parliament today have attacked Mr Peters as “Machiavellian” and “unpredictable.”

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Rob Salmond on the hysteria over spying

I don’t hold a candle for Rob Salmond politically, I doubt there is much we agree on, but he has a thoughtful piece that cuts through the hysteria associated with the constant left-wing push against the GCSB.

The fact that he has bothered to look at what the GCSB is for puts him light years ahead of the other lefty shills.

The most critical question is whether trying to help Tim Groser’s, ahem, optimistic bid to become WTO Director-General falls within the GCSB’s legal mandate. I say it does. Here’s section 7 of the GCSB Act, which gives the Agency’s objectives:

The objective of the Bureau, in performing its functions, is to contribute to—
(a) the national security of New Zealand; and
(b) the international relations and well-being of New Zealand; and
(c) the economic well-being of New Zealand.   Read more »

Concrete Cancer Cover-up, Ctd – Did Nick Smith mislead parliament?

The concrete cancer cover-up fiasco affecting New Zealand’s $400 million concrete sector has taken another turn with the Minister for Building and Housing Nick Smith now looking like having misled Parliament.

Under questioning from Winston Peters, the Minister for Building  and Housing Nick Smith initially covered off his statements by saying that “I have been assured by officials”.

But Ministers have to satisfy themselves that the answers they’re getting from officials are right – otherwise they get caught out.

So when Nick Smith gets cocky and thinks he knows best, he gets held to account.


Sources inside the industry have told Whaleoil of  a ‘WTF’ moment when they heard Nick Smith say this, and are now asking who is advising the Minister on this issue.

If he was getting good advice, he would not have told Parliament that “high alkali cement is allowed under New Zealand cement standard” – a statement that is likely to come back to haunt Nick Smith for the simple reason it is just wrong.   Read more »