Treaty of Waitangi

Iwi leaders’ water claim “nothing but corporate greed” says Ngapuhi academic

David Rankin has called out the Iwi Leadership Group for their attempt to hijack water in New Zealand, aided and abetted by Bill English and Nick Smith.

His press release makes perfect sense.

As iwi leaders from around the country meet to discuss claiming commercial rights to all the country’s lakes, rivers, reservoirs, dams and any other fresh water, Ngapuhi academic David Rankin has questioned their motives.

Mr Rankin, who is currently undertaking a PhD on traditional property rights, points out that prior to the arrival of Europeans in New Zealand, Maori never owned water.  And even after Europeans arrived, Maori never owned water.  He says that there is no cultural basis or historical precedent for the claim.  Neither is water Treaty right according to him “Water is not mentioned in the Treaty once.  ‘Taonga’ are mentioned, but these are not property rights.  A ‘taonga’ traditionally was something that could be acquired at the point of a spear.  Try doing that with water”, he says.   Read more »

Perfect Angry Andy has to backtrack

The media have been repeating the mantra that Angry Andy had yet to stuff up.  This was during three weeks of parliament and two months of holidays.   Quite the test.

Little’s first formal outing for the year was at Waitangi, where he shattered his ‘perfect’ record.

Labour leader Andrew Little has watered down his comments about exploring greater Maori self-governance, referring today to examples such as co-governance of waterways rather than allowing Maori to legislate and govern themselves.

On Waitangi Day, Mr Little criticised Mr Key for dismissing a Waitangi Tribunal report that found Ngapuhi chiefs had not ceded their sovereignty by signing the Treaty.

Mr Little said that report found Maori had retained their ability to govern themselves, including law making abilities. While that was “highly problematic” it should be talked about. Read more »

All of Little’s good work undone by ‘courageous’ pandering to Maori

Andrew Little, ably assisted by a compliant media, has supposedly built up his cred to better proportions than the previous leaders since Clark.

The claims though were specious and come from people who should know better were just plain wrong.

Whatever level of acceptance Andrew Little had managed to claw his way to, though, has been destroyed by his interest in exploring Maori making their own laws…kind of a Maori sharia proposal.

Labour leader Andrew Little has proposed looking at giving Maori greater self-governance, possibly including the ability to make some of their own laws.

Mr Little made the comments yesterday, referring to a Waitangi Tribunal finding last year that Northland Maori did not cede their sovereignty when signing the Treaty.

Prime Minister John Key was criticised by elders at Waitangi for dismissing that report. Mr Little said the Waitangi Tribunal report found Maori should be able to make their own laws on matters affecting them. While that would be “highly problematic” he said it should be looked at.

Mr Little acknowledged it could concern some New Zealanders. “The fear is always that these things turn into a ‘they are getting special privilege’ or ‘they are getting a control we would never be able to have’. We have to be sensitive to that, but we’ve also got to understand for iwi now and those who have had their settlements and developed their own economic base, there are some things we might want to say they can be responsible for that is consistent with historical obligations.”

He said it was time to look at what would happen after the settlements were completed.

He said some Native American tribes had law-making powers over their territories in the United States where recognised tribes were exempt from some laws – including taxation – and could create their own laws in many areas. Mr Little said allowing separate law-making was “highly problematic”.

“But we shouldn’t be so dismissive of any claim by iwi over what they do. We do have to function as a nation-state and we don’t want to compromise that. But let’s have a look at it.”

Mr Key said allowing some iwi the ability to make their own law would be “divisive” and he did not support the suggestion.

Read more »

Don Brash’s Orewa speech the media wouldn’t report

The other day Don Brash and Gareth Morgan fronted at Orewa. Contrary to the media reports it wasn’t actually the Orewa Rotary Club but only its premises that was used.

The media reported extensively the nonsense that Gareth Morgan spouted but barely mentioned what Don Brash had to say.

So I called up Don and asked if I could publish his speech.


NOTES FOR REPLYING TO GARETH MORGAN, 4 FEBRUARY 2015

Thanks for inviting me here today, and for the opportunity to comment on what Gareth has said. I didn’t see the speech in advance of course, so these comments are just immediate reactions based partly on what Gareth said a few days ago in a speech to a Ngapuhi audience.

Let me say first that there are some of Gareth’s views with which I agree. He said in his Ngapuhi speech that he is opposed to separate Maori electorates, Maori wards (and by implication the Maori Statutory Board in Auckland) and quotas for Maori in educational institutions. Granting any group special rights is contrary to Article 3 of the Treaty he said, and I totally agree with that.

It’s also patronising, and implies that Maori aren’t quite competent enough to have their voices heard in the political arena without a special leg up. Of course that is nonsense: when I was in Parliament, there were 21 Maori in Parliament – roughly the same percentage of Members of Parliament as Maori are in the wider population – only seven of them elected in the Maori electorates. The other 14 were elected in general constituencies or were placed in a winnable position on a party’s list.

Similarly in Auckland: the first election of councillors after the super-city was established in 2010 saw three people of Maori descent elected – not in Maori wards but on their own merits – and again three Maori out of a total of 20 councillors meant that Maori on the Council were in roughly the same proportion as Maori in the general population.

But as explained in his Ngapuhi speech his basic position seems to be that –

“.. the Treaty is whatever a reasonable person’s view of the following four taken together leads them to – not any one taken in isolation, but all taken together:

  • Treaty of Waitangi
  • Te Tiriti O Waitangi
  • Principles of the Treaty
  • Post-1975 Consensus on the Treaty.”

Read more »

Only 19 turn up to listen to the The Great Whinger

Gareth Morgan has been banging on for weeks about his ‘solutions’ to race relations in this country.

After slagging off Don Brash publicly he fronted up at Orewa yesterday and just 19 others bothered to come listen to the old fool…there were more media than there were Rotary Club members.

The views that propelled the National Party close to government a decade ago were “harsh and intolerant,” philanthropist Dr Gareth Morgan told a small audience in Orewa today.

The man who gave those views – Dr Don Brash – sat in the audience to hear his famous 2004 speech described as being a “harsh and intolerant view that is intolerant of anyone who is different”.

“We still have a faction in our midst who see admitting culpability… is giving Maori the upper hand. This section of the community is clearly filled with fear.”

As Treaty of Waitangi celebrations began in the North, the two Pakeha men attempted to solve the problems of the past 175 years in front of small audience of people largely in the same age range. A total of 19 people gathered to hear the pair speak -and almost the same number of media representatives.  

Read more »

He could form the Whinger Party with Eleanor Catton

The problem with moaning liberal elite luvvies and socialist “entrepreneurs” is that they like to hear the sound of their own voice.

Last week it was Eleanor Catton bleating on about how un-loved she is and assisting us all to now why.

This week we have Gareth Morgan having another rant.

Of course he’d never want to test his never-ending opinions on almost everything with the voting public would he?

Gareth Morgan is heading to Orewa to confront what he calls the “ignorance of Brash-think”.

The venue and name are a nod to former National Party leader Don Brash, whose 2004 speech in the town led to a heated period of debate about the Treaty of Waitangi.

Dr Morgan is stepping into those uncertain waters tomorrow when he speaks to the Orewa Rotary Club.

He said he had deliberately chosen to speak at Orewa because it was where Dr Brash gave “one of the most damaging speeches ever made in terms of Treaty relations”.

“It’s exactly the cohort I’ve been talking about as having a high level of ignorance on Treaty matters.”

He says there was a hotbed of ignorance which needed to be confronted because of the need for an ongoing relationship with Maori after all Treaty of Waitangi settlements are finished.

“There are still large tracts of people who indulge in Brash-think on this topic. I want to expose that.”

Read more »

Face of the day

David Rankin

David Rankin

David Rankin is an interesting person to do a google search on.

He has talked about the possibility of Maori not being indigenous in 2012

The status of Maori as the country’s indigenous population could be in danger if research, which suggests previous civilisations lived in New Zealand before Maori arrived, is proved true.

Ngapuhi leader David Rankin said books by authors such as investigative journalist Ian Wishart and historian Noel Hilliam presented “clear evidence” that some of New Zealand’s earliest residents might have arrived before the Polynesians.

He pointed to numerous Maori oral histories which referred to people being here when the first Maori arrived, including fair-skinned people.

“If we believe our histories, then we as Maori are not the indigenous people of New Zealand.”

The archaeological evidence in some research was a potential challenge to the status of Maori as indigenous, which was why he believed no other Maori was prepared to speak publicly on the issue, Mr Rankin said.

Details of much of the country’s past was being concealed by academic historians, he said.

“I would say it’s a conspiracy. They are worried that their own research will be exposed so they have worked hard to ridicule and suppress any Maori history which disagrees with their views.

“However, the tide is turning and more people are now seeing that there is a whole history of our country that has been concealed and which will have major implications for Treaty settlements for example.”

-NZHerald

Read more »

Rankin calls for Burqa ban at Waitangi

burqa_ban

Outspoken Ngaphui leader David Rankin had called for a ban of the burqa at Waitangi.

Presumably not just for Waitangi Day but all times.

With the 175th anniversary of the Treaty of Waitangi approaching, the Ngapuhi leader David Rankin has called for a ban on burqas being worn at Waitangi, citing cultural reasons:

“Islam condemns cultures that do not comply with its rules.  We therefore see Islam as a direct threat to our rangatiratanga (sovereignty) and our culture,” he says.   Read more »

Trotter on John Key’s history lesson

Chris Trotter isn’t taking the lefty stance of mocking John Key’s version of history after the stupid Waitangi Tribunal decision.

THE PRIME MINISTER, John Key, has been much mocked over the past week for his claim that New Zealand was settled peacefully. Hoots of derision have echoed through the Twittersphere from those who profess to know their New Zealand history a great deal better than the Prime Minister.

Are they right? Is Mr Key wrong?

It might help to place the Prime Minister’s comments in context. His remarks followed the Waitangi Tribunal finding that the tribal chieftains of the far-North did not cede sovereignty to the British Crown when they signed the Treaty of Waitangi on 6 February 1840.

This finding is considerably more controversial than anything the Prime Minister decided to offer by way of commentary. The Auckland-based historian, Paul Moon, has already derided the Tribunal’s historical conclusions, and his intervention is unlikely to be the last.

The tribunal’s decision will likely be ignored.

A crucial element of the settled view is that the Maori chieftains who signed the Treaty, many of whom had enjoyed long and mutually beneficial relationships with the Europeans who had taken up residence in New Zealand since Cook’s exploratory voyages of the late eighteenth century, knew exactly what they were agreeing to at Waitangi on 6 February 1840.

Captain William Hobson was guaranteeing them the inviolability of their traditional territories and the safety of their people. In the light of what had befallen the iwi and hapu of Niu Tirani (New Zealand) between 1769 and 1840, the existential value of these guarantees is readily appreciated.

The indigenous population of these islands at the time of first European contact is estimated at 100,000. Between 1800 and 1830 as many as 30,000 Maori were killed and/or driven from their traditional lands by enemy iwi and hapu armed with the devastating military technology of the Pakeha. The protection of Queen Victoria (symbolising the world’s most powerful nation) was what they needed. Hobson offered it. The chiefs grabbed it with both hands.    Read more »

Muppet Mayor Mandates Maori quota

These muppets never give in, it is bad enough in Auckland having unelected Maori board members lording it over us all, but now the Mayor of New Plymouth is proposing that all councils have 50% of council seats allocated to Maori.

It is breathtaking racism and wonky thinking.

I doubt he will be mayor for long.

New Plymouth mayor Andrew Judd has taken his fight for Maori representation a step further, calling for a law change so up to half of all councillors in New Zealand are Maori.

Judd, already fighting critics over his council’s plans to create a Maori ward, believes there should be more Maori representation across the country to better reflect the Treaty of Waitangi.

“The reasonable interpretation of the Treaty is that you would have fifty-fifty representation around the table,” Judd said.

“We should be incorporating the Maori perspective around council tables, and ultimately that would mean up to half the representation each.”  Read more »