Make a submission


When I saw that submissions were open for the Local Government (Auckland Council) Amendment Bill (No 3), I got all excited.

Unfortunately, it only addresses a small annoyance, instead of the bigger ones.   Read more »

Apparently wasting taxpayer money is less important now that the media attention has died down

The Taxpayers’ Union has been jilted by Steve Joyce’s MBIE now that the fuss has died down.

The head of the government department that spent $140,474 on a TV screen, $67,339 on a sign and $5,480 on an arts consultant for its new Wellington offices, has retracted an offer made to the Taxpayers’ Union to meet about the Ministry’s spending. Taxpayers’ Union Executive Director, Jordan Williams, says:

“After we expressed public concerns last week about the Ministry’s spending, MBIE officials told us that the CEO, David Smol, would be willing to meet and discuss the wasteful spending within the Ministry. Now the media heat has died down, they refuse to talk.”

“We wanted to have a serious meeting away from the media to constructively engage on how the Ministry is spending taxpayers’ money. Instead of keeping their word, the Ministry is once again running from accountability.” Read more »

Salt Tax – Reason #479 for Steve Joyce to cut funding to the HRC

Otago University currently has an image problem, especially its Department of Public Health Troughers, based in Wellington.

Nearly every bit of research that comes out of this hotbed of academic activism is a call for some form of new tax or policy change.

The latest is Otago University’s Public Health Expert blog calling a for a salt tax. This follows calls for a fat tax and sugar tax.

Here’s what this taxpayer funded research is calling for;

  1. Mandatory 25% reduction in sodium leves in all processed foods
  2. A package of interventions similar to those in the UK
  3. Mandatory 25% reduction in sodium levels in bread, processed meats and sauces
  4. Media campaign
  5. Voluntary food labelling
  6. Dietary counselling
  7. Sinking lid on amount of food salt
  8. A salt tax

And just to reinforce that these Department of Troughers know exactly who their audience is, they say:   Read more »

Getting married is a human right. So is not having to pay for it. Apparently


This is a story of troughing entitleitis that makes your eyes water…

An unemployed woman has her heart set on a ‘fairy-tale church wedding’ – and believes the taxpayer should foot the bill as it is her basic human right to be a bride.

Anna Broom, of Gillingham, in Kent, has not worked since the age of 19, during which time she has claimed more than £100,000 in benefits.

The jobless 33-year-old now wants an extra £10,000 to fund her dream ‘traditional English wedding and party in a castle’.

Miss Broom is desperate for a church ceremony, designer dress, horse and carriage – ‘like Katie Price’ – and champagne for her 50 guests.

Just as a rule of thumb, multiply £ by two to get NZ dollars.   Read more »

An update on the “$1.5M state house” that nobody will live in

The controversial $1.5 million “lighthouse” sculpture on Queens Wharf is being made more in keeping with its state house roots.

After two years of artistic problems and delays, Auckland Council has finally released the first public images of the sculpture, based on a modest Mt Eden state house.

Artist Michael Parekowhai has abandoned plans for a Venetian crystal chandelier weighing 4.5 tonnes and depicting a glowing garden of native flowers, birds and insects at a cost of $705,000. It will be replaced with 10 small chandeliers in a Matariki constellation, or Pleiades star cluster, referencing the Maori New Year, most of which will be made in New Zealand.

Last night, council chief operation officer Dean Kimpton said the budget remained $1.5 million, but there was no longer any cost to ratepayers.

The project will be funded from a $1 million gift from Barfoot & Thompson, interest of about $100,000, a $100,000 donation believed to come from arts patron Dame Jenny Gibbs and an anonymous donation.

Previously, the council agreed to underwrite the $500,000 shortfall after Barfoot & Thompson made a $1 million donation in March 2013 marking its 90 years in business.

It’s good to know that the Auckland Council are no longer pouring $500,000 of rate payers money into this project, but what nobody seems to realise is that there is still a huge operational cost that has already been incurred, and will continue to be incurred that the rate payer is still paying for.  Read more »

Speaker’s delegation in Europe confirmed as a junket

The practice of downgrading airline tickets to take another passenger along – as used by a trio of MPs on a trip to Europe – is off the table for public servants.

Three MPs travelling with Parliament Speaker David Carter’s delegation in Europe are believed to have traded their single business class flight tickets for two economy class tickets, allowing them to take spouses along on the trip.

So here is the circular argument:

Hey, you’re spending too much of our tax money!

– yes, nearly $100,000 of the total $138,000 cost is for business fares


– no, we need to be fresh when we get off the plane.  this is justified in this case

But you allowed the MPs to travel economy and spread the cost so they could take their wife, husband, spouse, significant other or favourite farm animal.  So now they won’t arrive fresh?

– …

The Taxpayers’ Union has said it raises questions over whether the trip is work or a junket.

The State Services Commission (SSC) says the practice would not be acceptable in the public service.

Sandi Beatie, the deputy commissioner, said the commission’s expectation was that when public servants had to travel, only their individual travel should be covered. The only exclusion was that the cost of relocating family was covered if a public servant was moving.

“Any ‘downgrading’ of flights in the manner you mention by public servants would not be appropriate. SSC has no record of ‘downgrading flights’ being considered acceptable or any directive on the issue,” Beatie said.

The commission’s standards on integrity and conduct stated that officials “use our organisation’s resources carefully and only for intended purposes”.

By definition, if an MP can travel to do business on economy fares, then we should send them with economy fares.

Or, they have to admit that it’s really just a joyride at the taxpayer’s expense.

One, or the other.  Pick.


– Hamish Rutherford, Stuff

National Party trougher defends troughing trip

An MP on a taxpayer-funded trip to Europe admits he is pinching himself, but says long days of events and meetings will help grow New Zealand’s economy.

Chester Borrows, National’s Deputy Speaker, also hit out at media scrutiny of the trip, saying such “free hits” sell column inches but show a lack of appreciation of MPs’ work.

The Act Party has slammed the $138,000 tour of Europe, led by Speaker David Carter, as a junket that will not deliver any real benefits.

However, Mr Borrows, who will attend events in Paris today, said people who are “very fiscally dry” undervalue good working relations.

“Do you only visit in crisis and never keep in touch with friends?” he wrote from France.

“The welcome we received was incredibly warm but such relations grow GDP in ways such as supporting and encouraging tourism. France sends 31,000 tourists to NZ each year with an average stay of 44 days.”

Some days on the trip would start at 5.30am and end at 5.30pm, with discussions on topics including educational opportunities, rugby exchanges, MMP in New Zealand compared to Germany, and children’s policies.

Mr Borrows agreed it was hard for the public to gauge such benefits, but that was linked to media reporting that started from a negative position. Read more »

Not a good look

When it comes to matters of high sensitivity, the annual Speaker’s tour is right up there. That has been the case since Jonathan Hunt led a five-MP delegation to Latin America in 2001. What came to be known as the “tango tour” saw the then Labour Speaker point-blank refuse repeated requests to release a detailed itinerary for the three-week trip that cost taxpayers the thick end of $150,000.

So the Herald made it a policy to ring Hunt every evening while he was abroad to get a rundown of what the delegation had done that day.

Hunt’s successors heeded the lesson, issuing just enough information in advance of their respective trips to avoid being similarly pestered during them.

The House being in recess for the next three weeks, this year’s tour leaves today for a 14-day stint in Europe which will take in meetings with fellow parliamentarians and high-ranking officials in France, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Poland and Germany.

That there are representatives from the four biggest parties means no one inside Parliament is going to accuse the delegation of catching a ride on this particular version of the Gravy Train. Read more »


John Key can’t defend the abuse of taxpayer money

This is rather half-hearted

Prime Minister John Key has defended the decision for MPs’ partners to gallivant across the globe to the tune of more than 100,000 taxpayer dollars.

Five MPs and their partners will travel to Europe for the annual Speaker’s Delegation during a 14-day visit to France, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Germany and Poland.

The tour will cost $138,000, with $97,000 spent on flights alone.

Mr Key told TV ONE’s Breakfast this morning he understood the angst surrounding MPs’ partners seemingly taking advantage of business-class flights and accommodation, but added they were within their rights to do so.

“Put it this way … Bronagh (Key’s wife) is entitled to come on any trip with me as Prime Minister, and she does come on trips with me, and when she does we pay for it personally,” he said.

“The tour from April 8 to 23 will be led by Parliament Speaker David Carter and accompanying him will be National’s Deputy Speaker Chester Burrows, Green Party foreign affairs spokesman Kennedy Graham, NZ First MP Fletcher Tabuteau, and Labour MP Adrian Rurawhe. Read more »


Wine growing bludgers whine as tax payer will no longer pay their MPI compliance cost


Turns out the MPI has been under-charging wine growers for their compliance services, effectively propping up our wine industry with tax payers dollars.  It’s about to end.  Queue the whining.

New Zealand winegrowers say changes to the way the Ministry for Primary Industries wants to recover the cost of its wine regulatory programmes will cost the industry $2.9 million a year and are “manifestly unjustifiable”.

The ministry is reviewing how it recovers the costs of its biosecurity and food safety systems across the country’s primary industries, after under-recovering for several years as the volumes of exports grew, according to its consultation paper on proposed revisions to the cost recovery regime.

While taxpayers in part fund it, under legislation the industry which benefits from the work must shoulder some of the cost. This is the first review of the cost recovery regime since 2008. Read more »