Twitter

Map of the Day

twitter map of Europe

 

This shows tweets made in Europe in location and language between Oct. 23 and Nov. 30, 2012, with each language shown in a different colour.

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Yet another reason for politicians to avoid Twitter

Readers of this site will already know about the thoroughly nasty and desperately stupid Anna “Marge” Lorck, Labour’ Tukituki candidate.

She has landed in hot water this morning, just as David Cunliffe is set for a tour of the Hawkes Bay, with her Twitter history laid bare.

Labour’s recently selected candidate for Tukituki has no intention of deleting a tweet in which she calls David Cunliffe a bully and says he’s “no leader”.

Anna Lorck says the tweet, which still appears on her Twitter feed, is “history” and she has since changed her views on her party’s leader.

A tweet from late 2011 said: “Can’t wait til Cunliff [sic] turns up in the Bay . . . We haven’t forgotten he sacked our DHB. He’s no leader. He’s a bully.”

Lorck, former community newspaper journalist and until recently the owner of a public relations company, was selected last month as the party’s Tukituki candidate.

She helped organise public relations for the region’s DHB after Cunliffe, as health minister at the time, sacked the entire board in 2008.

A short time later in Parliament, he labelled the 11-strong board as “a nasty little nest of self-perpetuating provincial elites”. The board was reinstated when National won the election later that year.

Lorck said yesterday: “The tweet is history, as is the sacking of the DHB.    Read more »

Twitter as a political tool

Matthew Beveridge appeared on The Nation to discuss Twitter as a political tool.

He makes the follow extra observations:

1) If you are going to be on social media: Do it, do it properly or go home. There is no point starting a Twitter account and not doing anything with it. There are a number of MPs who are guilty of this, Ian McKelvie, David Parker, Mark Mitchell (though he is now making an effort), Eugenie Sage.  They all have accounts with very low numbers of Tweets. Some with as little as 1. To me, going to the effort of starting an account, adding a profile photo and the like, then not using it is the same as walking away from a conversation. It looks like you aren’t interested in hearing what people have to say. So if you are a political candidate or MP and you are thinking about starting a social media account, make sure you are willing to put in the effort to do it properly, or don’t come out to play.

Mostly they should not come out to play. Most are useless at it and I still don’t believe that any meaningful engagement occurs.   Read more »

The Faketivism epidemic

Social Media has led to the emergence of even more faketivism.

If you look at the recent examples of such activities, we can look at the hounding of the CEO of Mozilla out of a job, and in New Zealand the recent actions by Giovanni Tiso against Radio Live and also the jihad against Paul Henry when at TVNZ.

Fakectivism is social media activism by small numbers of people that is integrated into the news cycle because it matches the media’s political agenda.

[...]

Fakectivism online multiplies the problems with media coverage of left-wing activism by completely distorting the number of people participating in a protest and their credibility in representing anyone except themselves.

In real life protests, the media routinely reported higher turnout for left-wing protests and lower turnout for conservative protests. Online, Fakectivism dispenses with head counts. If it’s a trending topic, then it’s news. And sometimes it’s news, even if it isn’t.

Fakectivism begins with left-wing agitprop sites selectively collecting tweets in support or against something. Invariably the handful of tweets are described in collective terms as “The Internet” being outraged or supportive of something. The use of the collective “Internet” is a staple of Fakectivism because it conflates a manufactured story with the impulses and opinions of billions of people.

Successful Fakectivism moves up the ladder to higher end left-wing websites searching for teachable controversies. These websites have enough status that they are monitored by producers and editors from the mainstream media looking for stories.

The mainstream media harvests content from sites such as Slate or the Huffington Post and reframes it in biased but credible language while disguising its sources. Twitter Fakectivism is invariably described as a “backlash” or a “firestorm”. Phrases such as “Twitter was lit up by outraged users” give non-technical readers the impression that the complainers represent the consensus of the site instead of a small number of overactive users.

The manufactured Fakectivism becomes a major news story by a successive filtering process that disguises the dubious source and the credibility of the originating event.  Read more »

The culture of “shut up”

Jon Levett writes at The Atlantic about modern society’s propensity to shout down those who we don’t agree with.

A recent example is the ostracisation of the Mozilla CE for daring to democratically put his money where his personal beliefs lay, and for daring to support one side of a democratic argument.

Then there is the case of Phil Robertson and Duck Dynasty being bullied off air, and the moves by the media and the pro-warming crowd to silence skeptics on global warming who dare to challenge their views on the matter.

Teacher unions and scientists use this technique all the time…”Shut up, when was the last time you were in a classroom teaching”…as if that is a valid argument for the right to have a say on education. “Shut up, what is your science degree in relation to? Was it in climate science” using the same childish argument to silence critics.

Homer Simpson once said that alcohol is the cause of, and solution to, all of life’s problems. And I kept thinking: That’s actually a pretty good description of the Internet and how it’s changing our discourse. It’s basically the cause of, and solution to, everything that plagues our culture.

That’s an exaggeration, of course. The Internet didn’t cause Donald Trump, and it certainly can’t solve Donald Trump. The way you defeat Donald Trump is by getting the ring of power into the hands of a pure soul, a hobbit, say, and that hobbit must journey to Mount Doom and release the ring into its fires. But the Internet: Did you know that every single day, the Internet produces more speech than was created between the dawn of civilization and the year 2006? You didn’t know that, because I just made it up. But it feels true. We are all bombarded. We are drowning in information. It’s no longer thrown on our doorstep each sunrise, or even just broadcast into our living rooms; it’s in our hands every waking hour; the endless stream of talking, as we spend all day moving our eyes from screen to screen to screen; it’s the first thing we see each morning and the last thing we see before we go to bed. The shower is the last safe space, which is why it’s the only place where we have decent ideas anymore.

In many ways this is good and getting better: We have unlocked the gates and we are removing the gatekeepers. We aren’t beholden to the views of the three green elders in the village. (See, I tied it back.) But what happens next—how we face the downside of so much connectedness—will determine whether or not this revolution empowers us, or once again empowers those gatekeepers. And I don’t want that to happen, because those gatekeepers suck. They’re arrogant and easily swayed by big, nice-sounding dangerous ideas; they’re ambitious and careerist and forgetful and unimaginative and shortsighted; they’re subject to groupthink, beholden to corporate interests, and enamored of fame and power.

I don’t want those voices to drown out the diverse and compelling voices that now have a better chance of making it in front of us than ever before—even as we still have a ways to go. And what I think we have to do, then, to protect this new wonderful thing of ‘a good idea can come from anyone anywhere’—is we need to stop telling each other to shut up. We need to get comfortable with the reality that no one is going to shut up. You aren’t going to shut up. I’m not going to shut up. The idiots aren’t going to shut up.

We need to learn to live with the noise and tolerate the noise even when the noise is stupid, even when the noise is offensive, even when the noise is at times dangerous. Because no matter how noble the intent, it’s a demand for conformity that encourages people on all sides of a debate to police each other instead of argue and convince each other. And, ultimately, the cycle of attack and apology, of disagreement and boycott, will leave us with fewer and fewer people talking more and more about less and less.  Read more »

The gobby German needs to gag himself

Kim Dotcom took to twitter yesterday to goad and gloat over ripping off his former staff.

Meanwhile in the High Court he was under attack on two fronts, in one case by Crown lawyers over his gobbing off on Twitter about details of the case and the other by Wayne Tempero’s lawyer seeking to overturn the gagging order.

Kim Dotcom’s use of social media to discuss his long-running legal battle is interfering with court processes, a Crown lawyer says.

Dotcom’s legal team returned to court today in a bid to access government documents to help the internet mogul’s case.

This latest request for documents came a week after the Supreme Court refused Dotcom’s request to access evidence the US Government has against him in his extradition case.

Crown lawyers raised Dotcom’s prolific use of Twitter as an issue during today’s legal proceedings in the High Court in Auckland.

This included concerns over Dotcom posting details of a confidential email between lawyers to more than 350,000 Twitter followers.

Crown lawyer Kristy McDonald, QC, said Dotcom’s use of Twitter has “demonstrated considerable disregard” for court processes.

“Is this about obtaining documents so they can be put out in the public arena?”  Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

missing-pet

Politician resorts to paying for Facebook fans because not enough people like him

Whaleoil has visited this story a number of times, when people buy fake “Likes” or fake traffic to increase their perceived popularity.

Everyone may well have a mate called Dave, but it doesn’t look like social media users want that mate to be the PM. Maybe it’s the bedroom tax, maybe it’s the legal aid cuts. I might even be the widely mocked picture of him on the phone to Barack Obama.

Whatever the reason for his apparent lack of popularity on social media, David Cameron’s team have resorted to paying to get him more Facebook likes.

Yes, Conservative strategists have forked out thousands in party funds on Facebook ads to get the David Cameron page more fans on the site, The Mail on Sunday reports.

Facebook wouldn’t reveal any specifics on the deal, but a marketing expert told the paper that the social media campaign would have set the party back around £7500.

The cost – which some Twitter users have noted is more than they earn in a year – even seems to have worked, with likes on the page more than doubling in a month to hit 128,000, overtaking Dave’s mate Nick Clegg who is on 82,000.

What’s the point though?  It’s one thing to buy your likes or your traffic, but unless you do so unobserved, everyone knows you’re faking it.   Read more »

Cunliffe continues charm offensive by stumbling around Social Media

Social Media can be a tricky mistress, and Cunliffe’s mistress kicked him right back in the goolies,

First, the “hit”

oops1

Wow.  That does look terrible.  Look how NZ’s power prices are shooting up.  And look how Labour “will” bring down power prices.  Gosh!

Next:  Goolie kicking time   Read more »

This is why John Key is the most popular PM in history

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John Key loves to be himself. It is a major reason why people warm to him and he continues to be our most popular PM in history.

He simply enjoys be him and it shows.

First there was planking, then Gangnam Style, now… derp-face.

Prime Minister John Key’s latest attempt to win the youth vote included pulling the silly expression with students at Victoria University.

He was encouraged by students to make a “derp-face” - defined at KnowYourMeme.com as “an expression sometimes used online to signify stupidity”.

Pictures of Mr Key clowning were shared on Twitter as he hosted the National Party stall at the university’s Orientation Week this morning.   Read more »