unemployment

More good news, it keeps on coming

Two more pieces of good news have come in this morning.

Ports of Auckland have reported a record month for March:

Container numbers continue their relentless growth, with a new record high at Ports of Auckland in March.  The port handled 54,427 containers (79,492 TEU), 10,305 (16,771 TEU) more than the same month in 2013.  This breaks the previous record of 54,049 set last October.

Ports of Auckland Chief Executive Tony Gibson said that “breaking the monthly record in March is unusual; normally the pre-Christmas period is the busiest.  Solid import volumes plus a lift in exports gave March a real boost.”  Bulk, break-bulk and car volumes are also up.

When good are flowing across the ports then you know the economy is booming.

Then Anne Gibson reports that Auckland’s jobless are at a 6 year low:

Auckland’s unemployment rate has dropped to its lowest level in six years, buoyed by economic growth and the associated demand for workers to the point where 48,000 new jobs were created in the city last year.  Read more »

More lies of the left exposed

Lindsay Mitchell exposes the lies of the left over unemployment.

In February the Daily Blog screamed the headline,

EXCLUSIVE: Billions of dollars stolen from the unemployed

which claimed a hundred thousand plus people were being denied an unemployment benefit.

The number of those on average receiving a benefit compared to the number of unemployed in the household survey is now about 130,000 fewer than it was in the late 1990s.

The missing 130,000 are the reason why so many social agencies are being inundated for help for food, clothing, shelter despite the so-called recovery in the economy over the last year…
tax cuts for the rich have been paid for by denying entitlements to the poorest and most vulnerable is theft from working people of about a billion dollars a year. It is time to get angry.

The tax cuts for the rich have been paid for by denying entitlements to the poorest and most vulnerable is theft from working people of about a billion dollars a year. It is time to get angry.

Then Labour’s Chief of Staff, Matt McCarten, still writing for the Herald on Sunday, picked up the accusation:  Read more »

Slight problem with Labour’s plan to tip the dregs into Forestry

Labour and the unions have made much of the death rate in forestry. At the same time unions resist compulsory random drug testing of forestry workers.

If those two contrasting positions regarding health and safety aren;t bad enough, Labour now wants to tip the indigent and lazy into forestry.

Labour is set to announce a plan to get long term unemployed working in forestry when Leader David Cunliffe speaks to an industry conference in Wellington this morning.

Mr Cunliffe will set out Labour’s economic plan for the forestry and wood products sector at the Forestwood Conference at Te Papa.

“We have a comprehensive policy package for the development for the forest, processing and timber industry”, Mr Cunliffe said last night.

“This package will be an example at a sector level of the economic upgrade that we outlined on Friday last week.”

Mr Cunliffe said forestry was an obvious area to start with.    Read more »

Cunliffe’s Taranaki claims last year put to shame by facts

Just a few months ago Labour was claiming the provinces were neglected. David Cunliffe even made some specific claims about Taranaki.

Taranakians are leaving the province in droves because they’re being forgotten by the National Government, Labour leader David Cunliffe says.

Mr Cunliffe said Census data released today would show a widespread exodus from the regions as provincial New Zealanders flee forgotten small towns.

He said these towns had been gutted by the hands off approach of the National Government.

“Job losses, factory closures, government cutbacks and the shutting of branch offices have left people in the regions with no choice but to leave in droves.

“Manufacturing is stagnating, economic development has been limited to glossy brochures and a few roads, mortgage restrictions are being unfairly applied to the provinces and tax biases are driving money from the regions into the Auckland property market.”

Except it turns out the opposite is true.  Read more »

Guest post: Are thousands of people being denied benefits?

by Lindsay Mitchell

The Daily Blog recently ran the graph below along with the headline, “Billions of dollars stolen from the unemployed”. Mike Treen wrote,

The combined efforts of both National and Labour governments’ punitive policies towards the unemployed seems to have removed over 100,000 people from rightful access to an unemployment benefit.

Source/ The Daily Blog

Source/ The Daily Blog

In today’s Herald Brian Gaynor has been exploring statistics, their variability and utility. He produced the following graph which tracks the quarterly difference between those officially unemployed (using the same Household Labour Force Survey data Treen used) and the new Jobseeker Benefit (projected back to 2008 by MSD):  Read more »

More good news, unemployment hits 3 year low

The opposition just can’t catch a trick at the moment…the government says economic growth is the way to to prosperity and out of unemployment, the oppositions says where are the jobs.

Then the economy grows and the jobs come on line and unemployment drops. Pretty soon we will hear from someone like Darien Fenton moaning that the jobs people are getting aren’t “quality” jobs.

Paul McBeth at BusinessDesk reports:

New Zealand’s unemployment rate fell to a three-year low in the fourth quarter of 2013 as jobs growth beat expectations, led by gains in the retail, accommodation and hospitality sectors.

The unemployment rate fell to 6 percent in the three months ended Dec. 31, in line with the forecast by a Reuters survey of economists, and down from 6.2 percent in the September quarter, according to Statistics New Zealand’s household labour force survey. That’s the lowest jobless rate since June 2009.

Employment rose 1.1 percent in the quarter, beating the 0.5 percent pace of growth forecast, led by gains in retail, accommodation and food services, construction, and professional scientific, technical, administration and support services. Employment grew 3 percent on an annual basis.   Read more »

Labour gets tough on bludgers

Oh wait…it’s not Labour in New Zealand it is Labour in the United Kingdom that is getting tough on bludgers.

Well-paid workers who lose their jobs could be paid claim more in benefits under Labour plans to reward work.

More experienced people who have paid more in tax would receive a ÂŁ120 bonus when they are first made unemployed.

The controversial policy would be paid for by extending the amount of time someone must have been in work before they can claim jobless benefits.

Shadow work and pensions secretary Rachel Reeves said the change was needed to help those people who suddenly found themselves looking for work after a long time in employment.

People who have paid National Insurance contributions for four or five years would receive more Jobseeker’s Allowance than others.

She suggested it could be worth an extra ÂŁ20-a-week for six weeks, worth an extra 28 per cent more than the ÂŁ71.70 weekly rate for over-25s.

The move is part of a Labour drive to restore the contributory principle to the welfare state, where people can only claim if they have first paid in.  Read more »

Going to custard in Australia?

As the good economic news keeps on rolling in in New Zealand spare a thought for our ANZAC cousins reeling under the legacy of a corrupt Labor government.

Tony Abbot sure has some work to do.

The poor labour force figures for December, released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), have taken the toll on the Australian Dollar (AUD), with the local currency slumping 88.04 US cents as at 1.20pm a three-and-a-half year low.  Read more »

How is the socialist prescription working for France?

Socialists continue to prove they can’t run a bake sale let alone a large economy.

Restrictive labour laws, rampant unions, higher wealth taxes, high minimum wages and all the other wonders that David Cunliffe and Russel Norman get all giddy over…end result 10.5% unemployment over 40% for the under 25s, the state consuming more than 50% of GDP and a colossal debt and deficit issue.

François Hollande’s credibility is lying in tatters after figures indicated he had failed to deliver on a central government promise to “turn the tide” on unemployment by year’s end.

Riding lower in the polls than any of his postwar predecessors, the Socialist leader chose to defy predictions by the IMF, the European Commission and the vast majority of private economists to bank on a turnaround in French unemployment by the end of 2013.  Read more »

Bugger off bludging foreign ratbags

Iain Duncan Smith the UK work and pensions minister has some stern words for bludging Johnny Foreigner.

The work and pensions secretary vows to protect Britain from ‘exploitation’ by benefit tourists and put those who work hard and pay their taxes first. …

Employment here is growing at the same rate as in Germany, and faster than the EU as a whole. Meanwhile, as unemployment rises in France and Spain, in the UK it has fallen by nearly 100,000 people in the past three months alone — the biggest drop in over a decade.

For those who are out of work, our dynamic labour market offers a real opportunity. Yet too often in the past, I believe we faced a challenge with our workforce at home. Under the last Labour government, more than half of all new jobs were taken by foreign nationals. Meanwhile, even during the years of growth, we had well over four million people sitting on out-of-work benefits — too many of them unwilling or unable to take advantage of the job opportunities that were being created.

There is no kindness in a welfare system that traps the individuals and families it is meant to help, nor anything moral in a fundamentally divided nation, one in which one section of society has been left behind. Yet that is the challenge I was confronted with on entering office, after Labour tried to cover up the problem. They left far too many British people on the sidelines, while companies imported labour from abroad. It is one reason why this Government is taking decisive action to reform the welfare state, a process that is now well under way.

We’re already fixing the broken system we inherited from Labour by placing a cap on the amount people can receive in benefits, reforming sickness benefits and increasing the expectations on some people to move into work while restoring the incentive to do so.

We are seeing excellent results. Already, half a million fewer people are on out-of-work benefits since the election. And notably, the latest data shows that of the rise in employment over the past year, over 90 per cent went to UK nationals.   Read more »