Unions

And they wonder why they’ve been outsourced

The SWFU is now undertaking an illegal industrial action at Auckland Hospital after their members walked off the job after learning they have been outsourced.

Unionised food workers have walked off the job today at Auckland City Hospital in protest against a contracting-out decision they say will cost jobs and be bad for patients.

The Auckland, Counties Manukau and Waitemata district health boards announced today they had agreed to a proposal to increase the involvement of the Compass Group from next December in food preparation and delivery at public hospitals and clinics. The scheme is expected to save $80 million to $90 million over 15 years.

Auckland DHB said Compass already provided 44 per cent of patient meals in New Zealand, including those served at Waitemata and Counties DHBs. Of the three DHBs, Auckland, whose food services are currently provided in-house, will impose the most changes.

Its chief executive Ailsa Claire said there would be no kitchen closures and all DHB food service staff would be offered the opportunity to transfer their employment to Compass on their existing terms and conditions.

Read more »

Time for Secondary Teachers to flee the PPTA

Angela Roberts and her cohorts in the PPTA have lost the plot.

It is time for secondary teachers to quit their union.

Firstly they waste massive funds opposing charter schools. Money that should be spent for the benefit of their members. Secondly they denigrate their own members through lying to the NZ public and treating the parents of kiwi kids like idiots. Thirdly they crap all over the lower end of the NZ education system where predominantly Maori and Pasifika are failing massively.

In terms of money spent on opposing Charter School Robert’s recently refused to tell Guyon Espiner on Radio NZ how much they had spent.

In terms of lying to their members and the NZ public they have produced another disingenuous document that tries to say State Schools get less than Charter Schools. They fudge the numbers – leaving out centralised services for State Schools, ignoring that Charters are in their start up phase, and ignoring the State Schools get approximately $30million to start while Charters get approx. $1m. They also ignore the official ministry figures.

The PPTA, of course, fail to highlight high per unit funded State schools. The data is easily accessible, you ahve to wonder why the PPTA fails to include these schools in their jihad…but then again they are union controlled schools:

Kia Aroha College: $12,000

Tikipunga High School: $12,300

Portland School: $10,200

Excellere College: $10,400

Pukepoto School: $10,400

Te Rangi Aniwaniwa: $14,600

Awanui School: $9,300    Read more »

I bet he was registered too

A ratbag school principal has been suspended for serious misconduct.

This is exactly the sort of thing that Labour and the teacher unions claim teacher registration is supposed to prevent when they claimed that lack of registration would put kids at risk in charter schools.

A school principal who formed a sexual relationship with one of his teachers and mismanaged school funds has been suspended after being found culpable of serious misconduct.

Dwayne Puruatea Hapuku behaved in an “unprofessional manner amounting to serious misconduct” while the principal of Otane School in Central Hawke’s Bay. He was charged with serious misconduct by the New Zealand Teachers Council’s Complaints Assessment Committee on March 26, and following the release of a Teachers Disciplinary Tribunal decision yesterday, details of the investigation can now be published.

The “core allegations” laid against Mr Hapuku included bullying staff member Kate Kimber-Jones, by threatening her employment if she disclosed their relationship and that he’d made her pregnant.  Read more »

Union slush funds and meddling dominating Victorian elections

The Victoria State Election is underway and already the Liberal party is focussing on the selection of Daniel Andrews and his connections with the CFMEU.

Private global accounting firm Moore Stephens’ costing of Labor’s policies will finally be released today — just two days before the election and after more than half a million voters have already cast their ballot. Labor chose Moore Stephens after refusing to submit its policies for scrutiny by Treasury.

Treasurer Michael O’Brien has hit out at the firm, highlighting how the accountants audited the discredited CFMEU’s WA branch.   Read more »

Another Great Charter School ERO Report

So about now the comments will flood in and all the apologies from the NZEI/PPTA patch protectors.

A Northland charter school which was one of the first in the country appears to have passed its first test with flying colours.

The Education Review Office (ERO) report for Te Kura Hourua O Whangarei Terenga Paraoa, released last week, found many areas of the school were doing well and identified just a couple of areas for improvement.

The kura, sponsored by He Puna Marama Charitable Trust, is a co-ed secondary school based in Whangarei that emphasises Maori education.

After initially opening its doors to 50 students on February 27 this year that number grew to 53 students with many more on the waiting list for next year.    Read more »

MPs in Unions

Guest post

I find it really weird that Labour MPs join unions. Except for the extra vote they get, there are no other practical, non-political benefits to joining a union. So really it is just some grade A brown nosing.

However check out the SFWU website FAQ section. For example (bold text is my own):

Can Supervisors be union members?

While anyone has the right to be a union member – it is often up to the union concerned whether or not to accept your membership. Often union membership is linked to the collective bargaining structures within a company. For most private sector unions the question is whether the supervisor has the right to “hire and fire”. Some organisations have employees in roles called Team Leaders as well as Supervisors who are coordinators and facilitators with the team, but do not have the role of hiring and firing. There is usually no issue with such employees being members of a union on site. However this will also come back to the history and culture in that organisation. Some unions may take the approach that supervisors with the management ability to hire and fire would not be signed up. Read more »

Time to turn the clock back on some of Clark’s labour market damage

National’s employment reform is causing the usual canned complaints.  We have petitions, and threats, and bleating from the usual corners.  National is stealing the tea break, didn’t you know?

Under the change, an employer would have to provide only “reasonable compensatory measures where an employee could not reasonably be provided with breaks”. That could be met by giving equivalent time off work.

Labour launched a petition against the move that drew 10,000 signatures in 24 hours. It hoped to boost that over Labour weekend.

Labour MP Andrew Little – who highlighted the law change during his first leadership pitch to party members – said it showed this was the most “niggardly and nasty” National Government there had been. “To begrudge anyone having a cuppa or a meal break during their working day goes against the grain. It’s a Kiwi tradition. Doing away with it is mean-spirited and unfair.”

Labour’s minority report from the select committee that considered the bill described it as a leap back to the failed 1990s model. They said it continued “the flawed logic” that employers, who already have control of their workplaces and an implied duty of employees to obey instructions, needed more statutory powers.

Healthy workplaces allow for flexibility.  Like working through lunch so you can leave earlier that day to go do something.   Or working through lunch for 4 days to take Friday afternoon off.   This is something that any normal functioning company and its employees work out automatically.   Everyone benefits.   Read more »

Since it is Labour day, let’s slay some union myths

Rodney Hide did it yesterday in the herald on Sunday, but since it is Labour day let’s look at the myth of the 8 hour working day the unions claim as their great achievement.

[Today] is Labour Day. Once again we will endure the annual claptrap that unions are great and won for us the eight-hour day. Without unions we would be working 24/7. It’s nonsense.

The Labour Day bunk dates from the start of European settlement. Carpenter Samuel Parnell arrived at what we now call Petone aboard the Duke of Roxburgh.

The Duke was just the third migrant ship to Wellington. Parnell was newly married, 30 years old and had travelled from London in search of a better life.

He found it.

On-board was shipping agent George Hunter, who asked Parnell to build him a store. Parnell agreed but on the condition that he work only eight hours a day. Hunter wasn’t happy. Eight-hour days weren’t the custom in London, but he had little choice: there were only three carpenters in Wellington.

Hence was born the eight-hour day. The practice caught on. For more than 100 years we have celebrated the eight-hour day as a victory for trade unionism. We know it as Labour Day which, on the fourth Monday of every October, is a public holiday.

We hear every year of the union movement’s long, hard struggle. It wasn’t easy winning the eight-hour day, we are repetitively told.

Without unions, greedy employers would have us working every hour, every day.

Read more »

The correlation between success in charter schools and union opposition to them

It seems union negativity towards Charter Schools increases in proportion with the success of the model.

Now Eva’s done it; really done it.

The already-controversial Eva Moskowitz committed the one sin that can only worsen the attacks against her and bolster attempts to block her plans to expand her Success Academy charter network: Her kids killed it on the state tests.

Whereas only 35% of New York City students scored proficient in math, 94% of her students rated as proficient. Whereas only 29% of city students met English standards, 64% of her students met the standards.

At her Bed-Stuy-1 school, where 95% of the students are African American or Latino, 98% passed the math test, with 8 in 10 scoring at the advanced level.

If your first reaction is to assume that these positive test results will ease Moskowitz’s pathway for winning the extra 14 schools she’s asking to be approved at the state level, your assumption is probably wrong.

The New York charter controversies are no different from the charter controversies in Boston, L.A., and San Jose. The better the charter, the bigger the pushback.

What sounds nonsensical actually makes sense: The most successful charters pose the biggest threat to superintendents and teachers unions that fear their expansion. Nobody likes competition.

That fear explains what just played out in Massachusetts, home to the top-rated charter schools in the nation. An example of that excellence is found at Brooke Charter Schools, which operates three K-8 schools in some of the city’s highest poverty neighborhoods.

Brooke students are posting some of the highest proficiency scores in the entire state. Not surprisingly, Brooke would like to expand, adding another middle school and a new high school for their graduating middle-school students.

But last month, the Massachusetts Senate snuffed out an attempt to raise the cap on charter schools, an action Brooke needed to build those schools.

The vote wasn’t even close, as senators, prompted by superintendents and union leaders, rushed to the microphones to denounce lifting the cap.

Read more »

How long before union muscle tries to destroy the franchise industry?

The Washington Post has an article outlining how the union movement in the US is marshalling its forces to attack franchise operators.

Those slimy SFWU scumbags will want the same for New Zealand.

The franchising industry in NZ worth about $20b. Unions wanting to unionise entire franchise systems would destroy much of that value.

Learn from the US, what happens there eventually comes here.

Franchising, one of the great American business success stories, is increasingly and unfairly under attack. Lawmakers need to pay attention and ask some questions.

More than 770,000 franchise businesses operate in 100 different business categories in the U.S., including restaurants, hotels, business services, retail stores, real estate agencies and automotive centers. These businesses employ 8.5 million workers and contribute more than $494 billion to the U.S. Gross Domestic Product, or 3.1 percent of total private sector GDP.

Unfortunately, franchising is the target of a well-financed, national campaign by the Service Employees International Union. The SEIU has launched a multi-pronged assault at the local, state and national levels of government.

The SEIU wants to undermine franchise contracts so it can more easily unionize entire franchise systems. The union and its affiliates want government officials to designate entire franchise systems as a single unit rather than the collection of separate, small business owners they actually are.

The reason is simple: It is much more difficult for unions to organize employees of thousands of independent small businesses than to unionize a single, large entity.

The effort is a desperate, special-interest ploy to replenish the union’s dwindling coffers and declining private-sector membership. The policy advanced by SEIU is meritless and stands in sharp contrast to years of federal and state legal and regulatory precedent.    Read more »