United Kingdom

Boris Johnson and Michael Gove set about each other with knives

Michael Gove announced that contrary to his previous position he was going to run for leader, effectively stabbing Boris Johnson in the back. Boris, for his part, then said he wouldn’t stand either, effectively stabbing Michael Gove as well.

Boris Johnson’s allies warned there is a ‘deep pit in Hell’ waiting for Michael Gove tonight after the Justice Secretary stabbed his fellow Brexit champion in the back saying he was not up to being Prime Minister.

Mr Gove delivered a brutal verdict on Mr Johnson’s capabilities and questioned whether his ‘heart and soul’ were in taking us out of the EU, effectively ending his hopes of succeeding David Cameron, as he announced his own bid for Downing Street.

Damning his friend with faint praise, Mr Gove said he had ‘enjoyed working with him’ during the referendum campaign. But he said: ‘I realised in the last few days that Boris isn’t capable of building that team and providing that unity.

‘And so I came reluctantly but firmly to the conclusion that as someone who had argued from the beginning that we should leave the European Union and as someone who wanted ensure that a bold, positive vision for our future was implemented, that I had to stand for leadership of the Conservative party.’

He added: ‘I thought it was right that following the decision that the people took last week that we should have someone leading the Conservative party and leading the country who believed in their heart and soul that Britain was better off outside the European Union.’

As the blows rained down on Mr Johnson this morning, key backers Nick Boles and Dominic Raab defected to Mr Gove’s campaign and arch-rival Theresa May won support from Leader of the House Chris Grayling – another Brexit champion.

Within hours Mr Johnson, who had been the hot favourite, was using an event that had been intended as his campaign launch to rule himself out.  Read more »

Oh the irony – the people scared of Brexit border control are looking to leave

So, they wanted to stay in the EU but, now they won’t be, they are looking at bailing out altogether.

New Zealand could see an influx of immigration from the United Kingdom, if a huge rise in Britons Googling for information about moving to New Zealand is anything to go by.

A Google Trends report shows a large spike in people from the UK searching “moving to New Zealand” after the country voted to leave the European Union on Friday.

They were also looking for information on Canada and Australia.

The Immigration NZ website has also seen traffic rise following the Brexit vote, more than doubling since Friday.   Read more »

Scotland talks about independence but are really just a bunch of bludgers

Ian Wishart writes:

Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon is a skilled politician.

I know this, because of all the hand-wringing and angst that’s emerged in the wake of the Brexit vote, hers takes the cake.

Given the quality of the competition, that takes some doing.

Oh I don’t know. Rachel Smalley’s effort was spectacular.

You’ve got the young people bleating their futures were robbed – an empty claim when we find out only 38% of them even bothered to vote.

Then you’ve got three million people – including 77,000 from the ‘Vatican’ with a population of a thousand – demanding the right to another referendum. Even if they got 18 million signatures, constitutionally it is tough luck: a vote is a vote. On the day, the winner takes all.

Read more »

NZ/UK trade agreement: first in, best dressed

As predicted, Todd McClay is in action immediately seeking to talk trade with UK and EU ministers.

Trade Minister Todd McClay is seeking meetings about Brexit with his counterparts from the European Union and Britain at a G20 trade ministers meeting in China to which New Zealand has been invited.

He said he wanted to discuss New Zealand’s best way forward in light of Britain’s vote to leave the EU.

“In the meantime, it is important for exporters to be assured that our economic relationship with the UK and Europe will remain the same for the foreseeable future.

“Even before Friday’s referendum, we had sought assurances from UK and EU officials that the rules around New Zealand access would not change until they have negotiated new ones with us,” he said.

“We have received those assurances.”   Read more »

Listen up Lefties

Just days after voting to leave the European Union, more than 2 million Britons and UK residents have signed a petition calling for a second vote, forcing MPs to at least consider a debate on the issue.

Parliament has to consider a debate on any petition posted on its website that attracts more than 100,000 signatures.

Read more »

Winston on cloud nine that democracy isn’t in the hands of the media, the experts or politicians

Winston Peters is in grave danger of having a permanent grin affixed to his face, especially if the wind changes.

New Zealand First leader Winston Peters hailed the Brexit referendum result as “a stunning 24 hours in world politics.”

“There has never been a national referendum in any country where so many outsiders, foreign power brokers, and financial market manipulators have intruded,” Peters during a speech at the Copthorne Hotel in Rotorua on Saturday.

Peters said “expert after expert” had told voters that Doomsday for the British was soon to come if they voted to leave.

“Anyone watching the BBC yesterday saw all these people giving their views and no one went to the working people and asked for their commentary, but suit after suit was talking about working people’s situation,” he said.

The power class are so up themselves they can’t even see the obvious irony of what they are doing. And that phenomena exists in New Zealand as well.

Read more »

By the time Turkey joins the EU, it will just be Germany and bludgers left

Turkey has piped up following the Brexit.

Europe’s politicians are failing to combat rising xenophobia and anti-immigrant views, Turkish officials say, after Britain’s vote to exit the European Union deprived Turkey of what had been a major backer in its quest for EU membership.

The Brexit campaign and the rise of Europe’s populist right have cast further doubt over Turkey’s decade-long accession negotiations, a process which was in its early years an anchor for economic and social reforms in the country.

President Tayyip Erdogan on Friday (local time) blamed Islamophobia for holding up Turkey’s accession process, accusing the bloc of double standards and warning that more countries could seek to leave.   Read more »

EU reacts with petulance, exactly like Brexit campaigners predicted

The EU technocrats have reacted badly to a sovereign nation exercising its democratic rights.

A senior EU leader has confirmed the bloc wants Britain out as soon as possible, warning that David Cameron’s decision to delay the start of Brexit negotiations until his successor is in place may not be fast enough.

Cameron announced on Friday morning that he would step down as prime minister by the autumn, after the British public caused a political earthquake by voting 52%-48% to leave the European Union.

Martin Schulz, the president of the European parliament, told the Guardian that EU lawyers were studying whether it was possible to speed up the triggering of article 50 of the Lisbon treaty – the untested procedure for leaving the union.

As the EU’s institutions scrambled to respond to the bodyblow of Britain’s exit, Schulz said uncertainty was “the opposite of what we need”, adding that it was difficult to accept that “a whole continent is taken hostage because of an internal fight in the Tory party”.

“I doubt it is only in the hands of the government of the United Kingdom,” he said. “We have to take note of this unilateral declaration that they want to wait until October, but that must not be the last word.”

Read more »

At least one Guardian journalist gets it

While the left-wing continues to unhinge at least one Guardian journalist, Matthew d’Ancona, has finally understood what Brexit was all about:

Before analysis, let us admit to awe: the sheer scale of the moment requires it. The word “historic” is deployed too lazily in political discourse. But it is entirely appropriate this morning. This is a hugely significant day in British (and European) history.

When a party loses an election, its soon-to-be-ex-leader rallies the troops and promises a different result next time. But no such option is open to the crushed chieftains of remain today. There is no “next time”.

This was a unique opportunity to seal Britain’s relationship with the European Union, or to end it. And the voters – at a high level of turnout – decided that it was time to go. They heard the warnings, listened to experts of every kind tell them that Brexit meant disaster, watched the prime minister as he urged them not to take a terrible risk. And their answer was: get stuffed.   Read more »

The left-wing is unhinging over Brexit and it is a wonderful thing

Amongst many on the left-wing is the claim that, despite a record turn out in an election, democracy has been eroded by the Brexit vote.

Presumably because their side didn’t win and democracy only works when they get what they want…until that happens democracy is broken.

Actually, democracy was broken and that is why Brexit prevailed.

Arts, lifestyle and travel blogger, David Farrar, explains:

The EU overall has been a force for good with many benefits for many people. However it is not what most would regard as a democratic government. The heart of democracy is that the people can sack a Government they have got weary of.  There was no real way for the people of Europe or the UK to sack the EU Government when they think it has got it wrong and needs to go. Without such a pressure release valve, discontent grows and grows.

The concept of an EU is good. The structure of the EU is bad. It may have worked when they had nine members, but not for 28.

Consider how unhappy we would be in NZ if our Government was not elected at the polls directly. Instead we each elected a local Mayor and Council (and all at different times) and all the Mayors got together and they decided who would make up the national Cabinet and Government to decide on our laws.  We would not stand for it.

You need to have the ability for the people to directly sack a Government, and effectively choose its replacement. It is that ability and need to be responsive to the public that makes a Government accountable.

Read more »