Vietnam

Concrete Cancer Coverup Ctd: How a real company deals with the problem

unnamedWell, well, well, just look at those headlines. Just an issue that WhaleOil has been talking about for months, yet MSM are only now waking up to the potential scale of the problem.

You see WhaleOil exposed the use of dodgy cement back in October 2014, when cement importing company DRYMIX imported dodgy high alkali cement from Vietnam.

This dodgy cement ended up in places such as the $40 million Manukau District Court rebuild and Fonterra’s $120 million UTH factory in Waitoa.   Read more »

ANZAC Day – For Skippy

I made this video some time ago for Skippy, my father in law.

Some of the photos in the video were taken by him at Nui Dat.

He was an Aussie serving with the NZ Army…he trained at Puckapunyal, Canungra, and Singleton…many of the places mentioned in this song he has been to.

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ANZAC Day – Lest we forget

Credit:  christchurchdailyphoto.co.nz

Credit: christchurchdailyphoto.co.nz

Original Post: 25 April 2006

This is my ANZAC Day trib­ute post­ing. ANZAC Day means a great deal for me and my fam­ily. I sup­pose it is because we have a con­nec­tion to the orig­i­nal ANZACS in 1915 and Gal­lipoli and to a vet­eran of a war much fresher in our minds, Viet Nam.

Firstly I pay trib­ute to my Great Grand-father Harry Crozier. I never really knew him, he died many years ago. Harry served in the Gal­lipoli cam­paign and thank­fully came home alive albeit with only one working leg. I know he spent con­sid­er­able time in Rotorua con­va­lesc­ing and learned to carve maori carv­ings as part of his reha­bil­i­ta­tion.

The sec­ond per­son I pay trib­ute to is a guy who truly epit­o­mises the ANZAC spirit. He is an Aussie, liv­ing in New Zealand who fought for New Zealand in Viet Nam. He is mar­ried to a Kiwi and has three Kiwi kids, and four Kiwi grand kids. He is also my Father-in-law.

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ANZAC Day – Face of the Day

This is my father in law, when he was at Nui Dat in Vietnam in 1966

skippy1

41873 Gnr Atkins KG, 161 Bty, Nui Dat, Vietnam, 1966

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Guest Post – Hanging on to our hang-ups!

by Frances Denz

Over the years one develops certain hang-ups that lose their rationality over time, but are very hard to dislodge in one’s psyche.

A couple of things this week has brought this human foible to my attention this week. My colleague was commenting on the fact that he absolutely cannot bring himself to buy a French car – even though a Peugeot is a great car. If it wasn’t French he would buy one. But he was deeply upset with the Rainbow Warrior bombing by the French all those years ago, and while he is no longer a supporter of Green Peace he still bears a deep and abiding grudge against the French.

In my youth I was deeply distressed by the RSA’s rejection of soldiers who fought in the Vietnam war, and when we wanted to put a wreath on the memorial to the dead and dying in Vietnam (inclusive of our war dead and the Viet Cong) the old time Returned service men fought to stop us. Police were called in and a sickening confrontation took place. I still find it hard to attend ANZAC day ceremonies as a result of my rejection of the fear and hate that those old warriors demonstrated. Forgiveness was not in their hearts. The New Zealand soldiers returning from Vietnam were not supported by the RSA for many years, and they never got any thanks for the nasty war they had gone through.     Read more »

A tattoo I would get

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This tattoo is awesome…it’s one that I would wear with pride.

A poignant tattoo honouring Kiwi war veterans has caught the world’s imagination, going viral on social media just days after being inked onto a Lower Hutt man.

A photo of Bruce Neal ‘s patriotic body art had gained 128,000 likes on Facebook by this afternoon, plus nearly 5000 comments and 40,000 shares.

The Wainuiomata ex-army man got inked last Thursday, and just hours later the tattoo was getting thousands of likes after Petone tattoo parlour Pieces of Eight uploaded a snapshot.

“It just went ballistic,” Neal, 59, said.   Read more »

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Photo Of The Day

Photo by Joe McNally/Time & Life Pic

Photo by Joe McNally/Time & Life Pic

Kim’s Story

Phan Thi Kim Phuc, who was famously photographed by Nick Ut as a naked 9 year old running from a napalm attack during the Vietnam War, holding her son and showing her horribly scarred back. Kim Phuc was the girl on the photograph that brought the world’s attention to the horrors of the war in Vietnam.

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Concrete Cancer Cover-up, Ctd – Core samples? Easy peasy

Core Samples from the Warehouse Pakuranga, Auckland

Core Samples from the Warehouse Pakuranga, Auckland

After reading the exclusive Concrete-Cancer Cover-up series, one of our eagle-eyed Whaleoil army member spotted something they thought we would like to see – photos of where concrete core samples have been taken.

And this wasn’t overseas, this was right here in New Zealand – at the Warehouse Pakuranga in Auckland.

Last week Winston Peters hammered Minister for Building and Housing Nic Smith over officials telling the Minister’s office that the $40.6m Manukau District Court rebuild has used dodgy cement and asked why core samples haven’t been taken.

It’s a good question that the Cement and Concrete Association of New Zealand (CCANZ) gets very uppity about.

Just image if core samples of the taxpayer funded Manukau District Court building were taken and sent to an independent laboratory for testing and came back showing they have a problem.    Read more »

Concrete Cancer Cover-up, Ctd – What’s all the fuss about?

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When you start investigating a story the interesting thing is how people respond to questions.

Some are helpful, provide information and are keen to see an issue resolved. Others are less than helpful and are keen on seeing the story shut down.

Sadly, Rob Gaimster, CEO of the Cement and Concrete Association of New Zealand (CCANZ) falls into the later category.  More on Gaimster later.

A recap is needed on why this Concrete Cancer Story needs to be told.

The basics are this;

  1. In January, February and March 2014, a cement importing company Drymix imported tens of thousands of tonnes of cement from Vietnam into New Zealand which, according to their own test results, failed to meet recognised industry standards.
  2. Drymix failed to make its test results available for public scrutiny which raised questions within New Zealand’s $400 million-a-year cement market.
  3. This cement had higher than accepted alkali content.
  4. Concrete cancer is caused by high alkali levels in cement combined with moisture in the concrete and a reactive form of silica in the aggregate. When this happens it can end up causing expansion and cracking in concrete resulting in major structural problems.   Read more »

Perhaps Gareth Morgan can give them some advice

Gareth Morgan has all sorts of advice lately, but perhaps he might like to take his motorbike on a trip to Vietnam to give them some assistance with a little culinary problem they are having.

VICE News reports:

Just after midnight on Tuesday, police in Hanoi detained a truck smuggling three tons of live cats into Vietnam. The driver, a 30-year-old man named Hoang Van Hieu, admitted that the ill-begotten cats were bound for restaurants in the country, where cat meat is, in fact, a delicacy, especially in the provinces of Thai Binh and Nam Dinh, not far from Hanoi.

“After receiving a tip, we searched the truck and discovered the cats inside,” Sky News quoted Dong Da district deputy chief of police Cao Van Loc as saying. “The owner, also the driver, said he bought the cats at the [Chinese] border area of Quang Ninh province. All of the cats were from China.”

With an average adult weight of about ten pounds for a healthy domestic feline, three tons means we’re talking hundreds of cats. The animals, crammed on top of one another in bamboo cages, were just the latest haul in a small cat-trafficking market that sources from nearby China, Laos, and Thailand to satiate Vietnam’s appetite for kitty flesh.    Read more »

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